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Managing Restitution After Federal Prison
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California In my new White Collar 101 series, I explains what restitution is like after completing a federal prison sentence. Hi. It’s Justin Paperny and I want to talk about criminal restitution. Unfortunately, many defendants primarily white collar defendants are hit with criminal restitution, and I want to briefly touch on my experience. The email that I’m looking at is an email that I sent out to people who opt in to learn more about my work, so this went out to a few thousand people. Of course if you’d like to be put on this list all you have to do is email me at [email protected] and I’ll happily add you. So, I just sent this email out to my list and I thought it would be a value for people who come cross it. And as I wrote in this email, I received a call yesterday from a gentleman who's about to surrender to prison, and he told me that after he was done with his three years of supervised release that he was going to stop paying restitution. When I asked him why, he said that he read online that you no longer have to after three years on what probation ends. So, that conversation took me back to federal prison as I wrote many good guys in prison they say that they’re going to handle the restitution in a few ways- one, they’re going to settle with the government for pennies on the dollar; two, they’ll stop paying restitution after their probation ended, and of course some say they’re going to keep paying until it’s all paid back. Let me make real clear- I’m not a lawyer. Some defendants might actually settle for pennies on the dollar, as I wrote; others might agree to stop paying at a certain point. This experience comes from my own experience. In this email I should say you should speak with your lawyer about a criminal restitution. So with that disclosure out of the way, let me read you the letter I received from the Department of Justice after my probation term ended in August of 2012th. So, this letter came from the US attorney's office telling me that although your term of supervision has ended, you still have a debt to the US government and we’re writing to remind you that you have to continue to pay. I went through a detailed financial worksheet, and of course ever since then I've continued to make payments. So, your situation might be different, but understand that when your probation ends you very well may get a similar letter telling you that you have to continue to pay and they want updated financials, much like you might have gone through with your pre-sentence investigation. Look, I have always paid. I keep detailed records of every monthly payment in case they lose it, or don’t apply it properly and I don’t want to test what would happen if I didn't pay. I made a commitment to the court that I was going to pay off my restitution, and I will.
Views: 4917 White Collar Advice
What YOU Can Bring to Federal Prison (NOT WHAT YOU THINK)
 
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Hi, I am Justin Paperny. Thank you for taking the time to follow our work. Our goal at White Collar Advice & Prison Professors is to educate you and your family through your experience through the criminal justice system. Each member on my team has been to federal prison. We certainly understand the anxieties that accompany this process. I can state with certainty that your journey through federal prison and beyond will be easier if you are prepared for your surrender to federal prison. And those preparations include more than just bringing in your medications and your ID. Those preparations include having the right attitude and frame of mind. If you get off to the wrong start it may be hard to gain any traction in federal prison. For that reason, you must be ready from the moment you surrender to federal prison. You must be stoic, strong and understand the environment you are moving into. Our videos are a good place to start. But you must take action and implement what we teach. Shon Hopwood was massively successful in prison. Why? Well, there are a lot of reasons he was successful in prison. One of those reasons was because he took action! I was productive in prison. Why? Again, there were a lot of reasons, such as desire, family support and a general attitude in that I like doing what others say cannot be down. I also took massive action, even on days I did not want to. Yes, it is hard to prepare in prison. Yes, I know your sentence may be unjust. Yes, I know that staff could care less about your plans to emerge successfully. I also know that your life after prison will be harder on those that love and support you if you do not take incremental, daily action. This video, What YOU Can Bring to Federal Prison, will help you get started. If you want to read my book, it is free. The only investment is your time. Text LIBERTY to 44222 to get a copy or visit www.WhiteCollarAdvice.com. To access our new course on character reference letters, visit www.CharacterLetters.com. Take care, work hard and call me at 818-424-2220 if you have questions. Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 3558 White Collar Advice
Shorten your Federal Prison Sentence
 
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How to Shorten your Federal Prison Sentence - Justin Paperny, director of WhiteCollarAdvice.com, shares strategies to shorten a federal or state prison sentence. Visit [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California The question is- are you a believer or non-believer. The non- believers will tell you there is absolutely nothing you can do to improve your chances in sentencing, and believe I served time with plenty of those guys in prison. The believers, however, are convinced that through their own efforts they can convey to the judge, the prosecutor and the probation officer that they are different than their plea agreement or some out of character decisions they made that led to that courtroom or that pre-sentencing interview. My name is Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice, the place where defendants and criminal defence attorneys come to learn about all phases of criminal justice systems. What is the relevance of creating a lengthy compelling document for the judge? And I’ll ask you; tell me about your plea agreement? Is it totally fact; is it part fiction? I have clients say to me “Justin, I’m not totally comfortable with it”. Some say “I did all of it”. Regardless of your comfort level with that document, the reality is the US government, the prosecutor has a current version of your life’s events, and they’re the one to focus on your sentencing on the terrible out of character conduct mistakes that you made. I would argue that not going to take the totality of your life into prospective when they sentence you. That’s exactly why you have to take matters into your own hands. Now, we are not lawyers at White Collar Advice. We work with tons of terrific criminal offence attorneys and certainly they have a role that cannot be replaced. They negotiate police; they work with the government; they write beautiful, you know, sentencing memorandums. Their role is essential. What I’m trying to convey in this short video is this: in addition to whatever your lawyer might be doing or whatever reports might be written by psychologists, it is on you. Through your own effort to convey to the court that you are better than some out of character decision that you might have made. Now, at White Collar Advice we certainly help clients develop this and put it to paper. My partner Michael Santos, whose background and success is really indisputable. Michael plays a significant role in the creation of and writing these narratives, then helping put our clients’ lines to paper. Their background, lessons learned, expressing their remorse, and really closing and expressing to the judge why you’ll never be back in that courtroom. I cannot tell you how many people reach out to me and say Justin, I’m just hoping the judge will forgive me and I remind them is not the judge’s position or job to forgive. You are asking him to seek mercy, and I believe and I build my career around the idea the judges are more incline to grant mercy if you show that you are worthy of it, and demonstrating it through hundreds of hours of though, introspection, that you’ve thought about the decisions that brought you to that courtroom.
Views: 4430 White Collar Advice
How To Get Out Of Federal Prison Early
 
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Completing the Residential Drug Abuse Program, RDAP, can reduce your federal prison sentence by up to 18-months. This video and www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com shows you how. Justin Paperny: Is prison in your future? Not sure of all the options that exist to get home as quickly as possible assure? Unsure if those glasses of wine you had before and after your diet will help or harm you presentence investigation? You are not alone, I assure you. Welcome to Federal Prison Advice. I am Justin Paperny, proudly our founder. Since 2009 I think Federal Prison Advice has been the leader in preparing people for prison. Okay. Let's get to work, and jump right in with this training video on RDAP, also known as the Residential Drug Abuse Program. Allow me to begin with the story. Richard was sentenced to 16 months in federal prison, after pleading guilty to wire and securities fraud. When Richard was questioned during his presentence investigation, the PSI, the probation officer asked him if he had any substance abuse problems. Thinking that opening up about his alcohol and marijuana use would make him appear unfavourably in the eyes of the court; he said he didn't have any problems. The truth was that Richard had abused substances for years. Had he acknowledged his problem, his PSI would have reflected these issues. Upon his surrender to prison, Richard learned of a cognitive behavioural program, better known as RDAP. He learned this program can both help him with his addictions, and of course he can learn that successful completion would qualify for sentencing reduction of up to 18 months- 12 months in prison, and 6 months in the half way out. Naturally, Richard tried to enrol in the program, but the drug abuse program coordinator denied, shut him down. Too many prisoners like Richard regret how they planned for their journey, including not pursuing RDAP. Do you like a different outcome? Do you like to get home sooner to your family? Think about this. Let’s continue our training and learn more about RDAP. What exactly is RDAP? RDAP is a voluntary 9-month, $500 program. In 1994 Congress created this, or approved this program for the Bureau of prisons to give up to a 1 year reduction of a prisoner’s sentence, and after 6 months in a halfway house or home confinement. Note, this provision was for non-violent offenders or prisoners, who successfully completed RDAP. RDAP is the only program that provides for early reduction. As such, many incoming prisoners want this program. A problem with RDAP is my story above highlights is that too many defendants haven’t learnt about RDAP until they completed the PSI or until they’d surrendered to prison. By then, they realize the original statements they made during the PSI process might forever disqualify them from being able to participate in RDAP, or rip the benefits of an 18 month time cut. In Federal Prison Advice we urge all defendants to understand everything they can about RDAP. The sooner defendants learn about RDAP, the sooner they can make a decision about whether they want to participate. Our lengthier program on RDAP discusses the program in its entirety helping readers understand the pros and cons, advantages and disadvantages. Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 8700 White Collar Advice
Federal prison tips and tricks :Prison camp
 
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Federal prison tips and tricks :Prison camp https://youtu.be/UIvg8edVdG8 Justin Paperny of White Collar Advice share some tips and tricks to make your journey through federal prison more productive and rewarding. Visit www.WhiteCollarAdvice. for a free copy of Lessons From Prison Visit www.RDAPAdvice.com for a free course on the Residential Drug Abuse Program, which can take up to 24 months off your sentence. Federal prison tips and tricks Today we are going to talk about life in federal prison and I am going to share a few tips and tricks to ensure that your experience is incredibly productive as it was for me. So, let's get started. Hi, everyone. It’s Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice. Thank you for joining me. And I am going to jump right into some tips and tricks. And, this video stemmed from a call that I received this morning. I received a call from a defendant, who is in the federal prison parking lot in Huber, taking him to self surrender to federal prison and he said ‘Hey, but I'm going in like 15 minutes. I downloaded your book a couple of days ago at White Collar Advice. I read it. Thank you. I have a better understanding. Can you chat with me for a few minutes?’ I’m like of course. I’ll be happy to. So, I shared I few tips and tricks with him and I thought they were valuable, and I’m quickly going to share them with you. So, #1 a tip- You can do anything great in prison. You can rebuild your network, write a book, lose weight, reconnect with your family, build a business. All of which is possible in business, you can’t do it if you’re having altercations with staff and fellow prisoners. So, something I wrote about in “Lessons from prison” was an altercation that a prisoner had with some other prisoners and how it led to problems with staff. And I get a number of these messages, so I got all these Mac products in my home in occasion I get a text message from someone: a wife, or daughter, son that will say ‘My father is in the SHU or the hole; something happened, we’re not sure. We’re worried. Can you help us? And sometimes when I hear the story, it is as easy as a problem with some inmates that led to running to the staff. So, in the story in “Lessons from prison” for example, and this is pretty pervasive, some prisoners, even the white collar defendants like to make their mark to assert their authority, which is foolish much of the time. Your highest value is getting home to your family; it’s not asserting your authority in the TV room that many fellow prisoners rule like it’s their fiefdom. They’ll get there in the morning. They will be there all day and all night. Okay, so you should avoid the TV room, but if you do don’t assert your authority by changing the channel, or if you are in there watching something and somebody comes in and changes it, big deal. It’s not the hugest deal in the world, okay? But, what I wrote about in Lessons from prison as I’ve heard about repeatedly, some prisoners want to assert their authority, and in Lessons from prison I wrote ‘this gentleman did that, and he begin to do that some of the fellow prisoners began to taunt him and to sort of make fun of him. And the prisoner went to and he ran to staff. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Federal prison tips and tricks
Views: 10001 White Collar Advice
How To Qualify For The Halfway House
 
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If you're going to prison you have to watch this video to ensure you qualify and maximize your time in the halfway house. Visit FederalPrisonAdvice.com to learn more. Justin Paperny: If you want to maximize your time in the federal halfway house, you have to watch this video. My name is Justin Paperny, and since 2009 I’ve helped countless individuals thrive to the criminal justice system, including maximizing their time in the halfway house. You have a choice today, right now, on whether you want to begin preparing for that time in the halfway house, or drift into space, as too many people do in prison. That might sound serious, too dramatic- well, it is, this is your life. We’re talking about prison. You’re got to be ready for all that’s coming. To those of you watching I ask how would you feel about leaving prison three months, six months, or even one year early? Well, with the passing of the second chance act that I benefited from that can definitely happen, but not by accident. So, if the time off interests you, keep watching this video, because your success in getting to the halfway house earlier can rest on what you learnt here today. Now, once you surrender to prison there is going to be a lot of things going through your mind. I totally get it; I’ve been there. But, you’re going to have to be focused for that team meeting and your initial meeting with your case manager, who assesses how much time you are going to get. What are some things you will, or he will consider? One, the nature and characteristic of your offense; the history and characteristic of you, the prisoner; availability- is there even room for you in the halfway house; they’ll assess if you have any disciplinary infractions in prison, what does you sentencing paperwork look like and more. How you adjust in prison is going to play a huge role in your halfway house. Today I’m just giving you an overview; can’t get into all of it. Some of you might be wondering, am I even eligible for the halfway house. So, let’s see, the halfway house is unlikely for you if, it’s pretty obvious I guess if you receive numerous disciplinary infractions in prison. If you chose not to pay your restitution also known as financial responsibility program, if you fail to participate in a sufficient number of prison programs, like toastmasters, which I loved, if you have outstanding criminal charges against you and of course if you’re facing a deportation from the US, the halfway house aint for you. People often ask me, who base for the halfway house, how does that work? There are number of ways and one of them includes you. Is a thank you for residing in the broken down, filthy, old hotel looking apartment halfway house, you’re going to forfeit 25% of your gross pay every week. So, it doesn’t take a genius of my degree from USC to know if you’re working 40 hours a week at $10 an hour, you know you’re not going to come home with much. visit me: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 7407 White Collar Advice
What To Do When YOU'RE In FEDERAL PRISON
 
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January 18, 2019 Hi, I am Justin Paperny. I filmed this short video after speaking to a doctor who is about to self surrender to Fort Dix Federal Prison Camp for a 40 month prison sentence. This doctor appeared overwhelmed about how to serve his time in federal prison. Equally confusing was what he would do after his release from federal prison. I could relate to his pain. On our call, I suggested he do two things: 1: Establish a sense of urgency 2: Choose his friends wisely This short video I call, What To Do When YOU'RE in FEDERAL PRISON, will help you focus and clearly define your goals on the inside. It will help you realize what is important and what is not. As always, and as I wrote in my books, Lessons From Prison and Ethics in Motion, my prison consulting and ethics advice only works if you implement the lessons I teach. Thinking is great, but you must act!! I hope you find value in this video. Best, Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2818 White Collar Advice
White Collar 101: The People You Meet in Federal Prison
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] Justin Paperny & Geoff Mousseau discuss the types of people you meet in federal prison. Justin Paperny: Hello, everyone. This is Justin Paperny. I’m here with my college Geoff Mousseau and today we’re going to talk about the people that you meet in prison. And Geoff, I’m asked about this a lot, and the reality is the people you meet in prison are very much like the people that you meet in the free world. There's pleasers in prison, arrogant people, narcissists, those who are wonderful people, who had criminal intent, others did not have criminal intent. So, prison is a microcosm of society, you’re simply going to find the same people inside. The difference is if you run into someone you don’t like at Starbucks, you might now have to sleep 3 feet away from them the next night. You are now going to be eating in the chow hall or eating dinner with them every night for next one, two or three years. So, tell us about some of the people you met in prison, and you know, where did you go to prison, and let’s talk a little bit about this to help those who are watching prepare for life in the insight. Geoff Mousseau: Okay, well kind of in a reversal I went to Long Park Federal Prison Camp, and one of the misconceptions that I had about going to a federal prison camp was that it would be populated by white collard offenders. And, although there were some there, they made up at most 10% of the population. Justin Paperny: Now is about the same thing for me. I was at TAFT Federal Prison Camp, the other camp on the west coast, but 500 prisoners there maybe 10-12% roughly white collar offenders. So, who is the balance? We already identified one segment of people in prison, a white collar offender of course. What made you the balance from your experience? Geoff Mousseau: Well, there are two groups: there were non-violent drug offenders with 10 years or less on their sentence, and there were another group, who had qualified by their behaviour, and by having 10 years or less on their sentence to be placed at a federal prison camp. Justin Paperny: See, that’s interesting, because when I surrendered, I did very little preparation and that’s part of the reason we do these videos. I prepared terribly and I remember walking the track, and I write about this in my Book Lessons from Prison that I’ll send to anybody who wants a copy. I was walking the track and I said to a friend that I had made ‘wow, least there are a non violent guys here and you know, everyone has 10 years or less’, and he corrected me, and he was like ‘dude, one, I don’t think because you are in a camp there hasn’t been some violence taking place by someone who’s been here; maybe they didn’t get caught for them.’ Like what; kind of that would freak me out. Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 10137 White Collar Advice
How To Overcome A Department of Justice Press Release
 
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How to overcome a Department of Justice or Securities and Exchange Commission Press Release: Presuming one is guilty or pleads guilty this video offers strategies to deal with the fallout. Call (818) 424-2220 to schedule a complimentary call or visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com to learn more. Justin Paperny: Hi. This is Justin Paperny. Thursday, December 4th. I want to jump right into the dreaded Department of Justice press release. I received a call from a prospect this morning, and I was beginning to write a blog and then said you know what, I’m going to do a video blog, and have my one of my two press releases posted throughout the whole video. And, for some background, this is my press release after pleading guilty in 2007. I was a stockbroker who worked at Bear Stearns and UBS. Several years into my career I made some bad decisions on behalf of the hedge fund manager, and as a result he was sentenced to five years in prison; I served 18 months. Prior to my guilty plea I asked the US attorney to not issue a press release. He chuckled and said that I have to issue a release. It's a deterrent and that's the way it goes. You shouldn’t have crossed the line and committed fraud. So, I too like many of you watching had to endure this press release and I put in some strategies that have helped to me overcome it. So back to the call this morning, this prospect said “I'll tell you my name and my case, but you cannot Google my name.” And I said, “Okay, I’m busy. I won’t Google your case if you don’t want me to. Why?” He said, “If you Google it, you could potentially keep moving my Department of Justice press release back up to the top and it’s just very tough to read. It's embarrassing; I’m ashamed and I just don't want anyone to know.” I said “Okay. Besides not wanting me to Google your name, or having others Google your name, what are some other strategies you're putting in place to overcome this release, are there you know, some of the fallout from this?” And he said, “You know my lawyer and I are meeting with a PR firm, and you know, they’re going to be writing some releases that talk about all the good I've done throughout my life, and you know, I think it’s a good strategy, and you know I've done a lot of good things.” So I said, “Okay, what’s that going to run you?” He said, “I don’t know, maybe 10 or 20 grand, but what's 10 or 20 grand when you're talking about your life and your good name.” Then I asked “How many of those releases are you preparing to write?” He said “Well, I'm not a professional writer. I wouldn’t know what to write. What I'm going to write? That's what I'm paying these people to do.” He asked my opinion. I told him to not hire a PR firm like I foolishly once did. It’s like flushing money down the toilet. Nothing is going to remove that Department of Justice press release that will be there as long as we live; will be there for your kids and grandkids to see as well. visit me: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2050 White Collar Advice
Tips From A Federal Judge On How To Get A Shorter Federal Prison Term
 
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July 6, 2018 On June 22, I had the privilege of training criminal defense attorneys at the Fairmont Hotel in Santa Monica. The National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) was coordinating the two white-collar crime conferences. In addition to training scores of white-collar defense attorneys, and federal public defenders, on the importance of the presentence report, sentencing narratives and sentencing mitigation, I had the opportunity and pleasure of presenting with Judge Benita Pearson from Ohio, Judge Pearson's insights for any defendant facing sentencing are truly invaluable. I am pleased to share them in this video, along with other takeaways from the conference. If you have questions about our process that has guided more than a 1,000 defendants to success, call me at 818-424-2220. Be well and work hard, Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 4324 White Collar Advice
White Collar 101: Watch This Before Hiring A Lawyer
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California White Collar 101: Hiring A Criminal Defense Attorney. Justin Paperny and Geoff Mousseau provide their observations and experiences on how to hire a criminal defense attorney. If you are being investigated for a white collar crime or need a lawyer, you must watch this video. Hi. This is Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice. I’m here with my friend and partner and college Geoff Mousseau. Geoff is a former lawyer and like me a conducted felon, who endured some time in federal prison camp. And today we’re going to talk about how to hire a criminal defense attorney. I got to admit Geoff, when I hired a lawyer I kind of believed whatever they told me. I really quickly scratched them a check and I didn’t knew any new diligence, didn’t ask any questions, and like a lot of the people that reach out to us, they have some wonderful lawyers, but some have regrets over the due diligence they put in in hiring their lawyers. So, I know a lot of people reach out to us for the prison preparation, life on the inside for the probation, but if you are lucky enough to watch this before actually hiring a lawyer, you can learn from our mistakes and profit from our experiences in retaining the best council. So Geoff, let me turn it over to you. Give us a little summary of your experience, and as a lawyer how you came to hire a criminal defense attorney? Geoff Mousseau: Well, Justin in this regard I, as you pointed out, I am an attorney. I am no longer licensed, and from that perspective I had the opportunity prior to having my own case of engaging criminal defense attorneys for other clients of mine in the past. So, I had some experience with it by the time I had to do it for myself. And based on my experience, there were three primary things that I looked for: 1. I looked for the experience of the attorney; 2. I look for price. 3. And, also the rapport between the attorney and the client. Justin Paperny: Now, let me jump in for a second. A number of people who reach out to us, when they're looking at lawyers can be enamored by the fact that their criminal defense attorney is a former US attorney. And I know that’s very impressive. We work with a lot of lawyers that are former US attorneys. David Rosenfeld who is a member of our directory; a lawyer in New York, is an excellent defense attorney; was a US attorney. Did that- was your lawyer a former US attorney? Did that factor into your decision-making? Walk us through that. Geoff Mousseau: Yes. When you are dealing with federal crimes, if you have the ability generally speaking to hire a former US attorney, you are hiring somebody, who by definition has the type of experience and has worked in the arena, probably, usually with the same set of judges who are going to be handling that side of your case. They are usually more expensive, and that is not always the most important thing to consider. Depending on the nature of your, the alleged defense, sometimes the person with the most experience is a US public defender.
Views: 5099 White Collar Advice
10 Ways To Get More Time In Federal Prison :White Collar 101
 
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10 Ways To Get More Time In Federal Prison - 818-424-2220 Free copy of Lessons From Prison at www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com Text "SOCRATES" to 44222 for our free updated course on RDAP 10 Ways To Get More Time In Federal Prison Fact: Most defendants underestimate what they can do to improve their chances at sentencing. They embrace the “there isn’t anything I can do” mantra and hurt themselves and their family in the process. At White Collar Advice we help defendants serve the shortest sentence possible in the most favorable institution. We don't do this by offering worthless guarantees or preying on vulnerable defendants. We succeed, and have the testimonials and case studies to prove it, by following data driven strategies. There are consequences to not going all in to prepare for the best outcome. I share them in my new video: 10 Ways To Get More Time In Federal Prison. Some of these ways include: #1: Committing new crimes #2: If you plead guilty, are you truly accepting responsibility? #3: Not working #4: Continuing to live like a rock star #5: Avoiding community service #6: Letting everyone else do the work #7: Not pursuing the Residential Drug Abuse Program #8: Not working openly and honestly with your lawyer #9: If you have the means, not making any restitution payment #10: Not making a statement or issuing a disastrous statement at your sentencing. Justin Paperny We’re dealing with Department of Justice potentially issuing press releases all over Google, the loss of our licenses, our careers, the pain and shame that we’ve created are brought to our family and creating victims potentially. The time before can be so stressful that it can preclude some defendants from preparing properly. And in so doing they end up serving measurably longer prison terms. This month I had four client get sentenced and there's a reason I think, they got the low-end of the range and some well below the low-end of the range. It's a result of their response, the efforts they put in place on a daily basis, which if you're watching this and prison might be in your future you have to block out time each and every day in your calendar to prepare for the best outcome, but like I said there is so much stress associated with this process that some don't prepare, or some don’t know what to do, and that’s the reason I’m creating this video or these videos. I know the last thing you probably want to do is watch a video from a prison consultant on how to get the shortest possible prison term, but you're here and I admire that you're here, because I was in la la land and in space before I went to federal prison. So, while you might not want to be watching these videos, I admire you for taking action, because the reality is there are a number of defendants who had criminal intent, who woke up with intentions to defraud and deceive, and to exploit others for their own gain, and those defendants make it a shorter sentence than those who had no criminal intent, those who might've been swept into a fraud. It’s how you respond to the investigation; it’s the way you work with your lawyer; it’s the way you might own it if you pled guilty that will heavily influence the time you might serve in federal prison. That's what I'm going to touch on today- strategies or lack of strategies that some defendants put in place that can actually lead to a longer term in federal prison. Hi. It’s Justin Paperny at White Collar Advice and again I’m thankful you’re allowing me to better prepare you and your family for this journey, so let’s jump in with some ways the defendant serve a longer time in prison that’s necessary. And the number one way is obvious as it might seem is the number of defendants commit new crimes. My co-conspirator for example, committed new crimes while cooperating with the government. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 5304 White Collar Advice
The #1 Mistake Made In Federal Prison
 
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Visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. Or call/text 818-424-2220 with any questions. www.WhiteCollarAdvice.com to access all of our blogs www.RDAPAdvice.com for our free lesson plan on RDAP Justin Paperny, author of Lessons From Prison and Ethics in Motion, shares the biggest mistake that people make in federal prison. Justin Paperny: Hi. It’s Justin Paperny setting at the 7th of August. I’m going to knock out a quick video. Quick because I'm exhausted; just played a rare round of golf, which was not great. You should not come to this channel looking for golf tips. I’m going to film this video talking about the biggest mistake that people make in federal prison, and as much as I tried to play golf today, I had my I-phone in my pocket, but my wonderful wife for Hanukkah bought me this Apple watch. So, it's on and the text messages can come, and on the 14th hole it was a very long day I got a text message from a defendant, who has been released and it’s on probation. And as I said before about 20% of the defendants that reach out to me have completed their term in federal prison. I texted him in between holes letting him know that I’d reach out to him when my rare round of golf was over and on way home I spoke with him. And I was just so frustrated, because when I chatted with him it was obvious that his time in prison was a waste, and the biggest mistake, the number one mistake that people make in federal prison is letting the time or feeling like they're serving time, rather than letting the time serve you. There is this disconnect that because you're in prison that is impossible to accomplish things. If you’re going to prison, you don’t want to be there, of course, but if you are there never forget that just because your body is there, your mind is free to roam. You are free to do things you never could have imagined in your wildest dreams; no texting for a little while; run a marathon, run two, run 10 miles, run 20; fast, take classes, learn a second language, write love letters to your wife, read books alongside your children. And, when I spoke with this defendant- he actually just texted me, I’m sorry for the distraction. When I spoke with this defendant, he didn't do any of that in prison. He was so fixated on all that he had lost and I know how much we can lose traversing the criminal justice system, our money, our careers, our reputations. So, while there it’s so easy to fixate on those things that we don't make measurable progress, or we work on things that bear no resemblance the life we want to lead upon release.I had a lot of opportunities in life that I wasted: a degree from USC, parents that spoiled me rotten that gave me opportunities that many people watching this video can only dream and rather than feel grateful to them, I took advantage of them and I embarrass them and I hurt them.
Views: 17442 White Collar Advice
What is the best date to surrender to federal prison?
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Justin Paperny discusses the how to find the best date to surrender to federal prison? Hi. It’s Justin Paperny with Federal Prison Advice. I’ll jump right into something I’m very proud of that we've added to the Federal Prison Advice website- the membership program that will become life next month. So, in addition to the courses and lesson plans on every aspect to the system, there will be additional membership, additional benefits for members, and include the strategic plans, at least two private coaching calls for each member. People have told me I’m insane including some calls, because of the time commitment, but again I created a program that would have impacted me when I was in such trouble prior to my surrender in TAFT Federal Prison Camp. I will be adding how-to videos. I will be covering stuff I can never put on YouTube that relates to life in prison restitution, many other areas that the weekly office hours are essential to get your questions answered, and of course while you’re away your family’s questions answered throughout the journey as you get closer to home. We have a private page of course, and I want to focus for the next few minutes on this resource that we have added to this site. And this resource is a sentencing tool that can reveal the best day to surrender to prison to get up to six days off of your term. There's no magic; we’re not doing anything crazy. But, in reality the day that you surrender and the way the BOP computes your release date based on the month and all the good stuff could impact how many days in prison you actually serve. So, let's go through this exercise together. There you go sentencing tool, and this access will be for those who choose to just purchase the sentencing tool on its own, but it will also be part of the larger blueprint training program; a part of that program is well. So, in addition to telling you the best day to surrender, it also gives you capacity and likelihood that you’re going to get the prison of your choosing. So, enough talk. Okay. Let's go through a real example. We’re going to click the 24th of March; that’s today. Let’s just pick an exact number. Let’s just say you got sentenced to eleven months; let’s do my ZIP Code here in Los Angeles and defendant was released. And let’s just say you spent one day in custody. Essentially that was the day you are arraigned; you’ve got credit for that day. So, let’s see what the data- sorry, one day in custody. Let’s analyze what that looks like. So, here we go. So, based on that data it right off the bat it’s going to tell you the population and capacity for prisons in my area. So, if we look at the second one TAFT Camp, my home is 87 miles from my ZIP Code, the current population is 499, capacity 560.
Views: 3168 White Collar Advice
How Much Does It Cost To Live In Federal Prison?
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Justin Paperny describes exactly how much it can cost to live inside a federal prison. Justin Paperny: This is Justin Paperny with Federal Prison Advice. I’m really excited to be with you today, and we’re going to talk budgets and what it can cost living inside a federal prison. Now, some of my viewers might know I was once a stockbroker who built my career at Bear Stearns and UBS. I share this because despite having a career as a money manager I did a pretty poor job of managing my budgets from prison. So, I hope this video opens your eyes to what it can cost to live in prison so you and your family can better prepare. Now prior to my surrender to TAFT Federal Prison camp I just didn't understand all the ways that I could spend money and how quickly it seemed to go. Admittedly I always felt like I was playing catch up. Look, even as I reached the end of my term at TAFT federal prison camp, I was still challenged to manage my commissary info minutes properly. Now, for some background each prison of the federal system receives an allotment of 300 telephone minutes each month or every single month. So, that averages out to fewer than 10 minutes per day on a 31 day month. Not a lot of minutes. In addition to not managing my budgets very well, I did a pretty poor job of my telephone allowance. Despite having goals of how often I would call home and how frequently, issues at home required that I some days go beyond the 10 minutes a day. As a consequence of using too many phone minutes earlier in the month, it wasn't uncommon for me to reach the end of the month without having very many minutes left. And then I couldn't call my friends or my family and it was just part of it. I always could've done a better job. There is some relief in November and December when we get 400 phone minutes. Now, besides a 300 minute phone limit we had to deal with at TAFT camp was a 20 point visitation schedule. Now, some prisons have different policies and rules on visitation; TAFT was a point schedule. What does that mean? That meant Friday at TAFT camp cost four points, Saturdays cost eight points, and Sundays cost six points. That means if you are visiting on Fridays you could visit every Friday throughout the month. Break down the points you’ll get an idea of how often you can visit. It was easier for me to visit on Fridays because I didn't have children who were in school, so people could come and see me on that Friday and take a day off of work. Now, another limit that I always had to contend with, you'll have to contend with is what it cost to live in the commissary. When I was in prison it was 290 a month; now it's 320, and that includes everything: aspirin, medicine, toiletries. visit me: http://whitecollaradvice.com http://etikallc.com
Views: 4374 White Collar Advice
Back To Federal Prison For Violating Probation
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California How To Violate Probation: Justin Paperny, of WhiteCollarAdvice.com, shares story of white-collar offender who might return to federal prison for violating his terms of federal probation
Views: 1628 White Collar Advice
The Best & Worst Things To Tell A Federal Judge
 
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If you have interest in learning what you can and cannot say in a letter or statement to a federal judge, I would watch this video. To invest in our sentencing program, which includes a review of your narrative, click the link below :https://www.whitecollaradvice.com/sentencing-narratives/ Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 1687 White Collar Advice
Can a Proffer Help Minimize a Prison Sentence?
 
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Can a Proffer Help Minimize a Prison Sentence? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQXNcmsjhFE Justin Paperny interviews former U.S. Attorney and criminal defense attorney, David Rosenfield, of Herrick, Feinstein LLP, on the pros of cons of a white collar defendant sitting for a proffer session with the United States Attorneys Office. Further, Justin and David discuss how a proffer could help minimize a prison sentence. David Rosenfield can be reached at: 212-592-1513 http://www.herrick.com/david-m-rosenfield/ Justin Paperny can be reached at 818-424-2220 Justin Paperny: Hi. This is Justin Paperny and I am pleased to welcome my college and friend David Rosenfield. David was a US attorney for more than 12 years. He was a white collar defence attorney with Herrrick Feinstein for more than 12 years. And there is so much we can cover today with respect to how white collar defence attorney can help you, but we are going to focus on proffers. And I wanted to do this video in part because I received a call from a defendant who had a proffer session and he said “Justin, I’ve been watching your videos. I wasn’t prepared for the proffer. It went horribly. The US attorney thought I was sort of some smug, arrogant guy. That wasn’t me. I just didn’t know what to expect, so I immediately got on the phone with David. I wanted to get his advice. Quick disclosure- it’s impossible to cover everything in a 10 of 12 minute video on a proffer. We could write a book about it. Okay, so for those of you that want more information I’m going to put up David’s phone number, a link to his bio, his email. You can get in touch with him or me. We’ll make it happen. So, I want to do an overview of a proffer today by starting off by saying David welcome. And what is a proffer agreement for a white collar defendant who’s potentially in an investigation? [Minimize a prison sentence] David Rosenfield: Well, what a proffer agreement is it’s an agreement between a client- a potential defendant and the government, whereby the client agrees to meet with and speak to prosecutors about facts that are relevant to an investigation and that client’s potential participation in criminal activity. They’re written. Almost always are written proffer agreement that are signed by both the government, by the client and the client’s attorney. But, the proffer session itself is essentially an interview. Justin Paperny: And, the interview is probably, is it going to take place before someone might plead guilty earlier in the investigation? When is it an ideal time potentially for a proffer? Walk us through that timeline as it could exist. [Minimize a prison sentence] David Rosenfield: The best time is early in the investigation. Let’s say the government comes and visits you, the FBI guys visit you and they want to talk to you about your involvement in a case and you say well I want to cooperate, but I want to talk to my attorney. You meet your attorney and the first things the attorney may do is set up a proffer session after preparing you for that proffer session. [Minimize a prison sentence] Justin Paperny: So, let’s walk through some of the pros and cons of a proffer. Clearly this gentleman who reached out to me the con was when poorly; they didn’t get a real appreciation for either his contrition or remorse and I’m not sure how openly he worked with them or how well he prepared. https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Minimize a prison sentence
Views: 2924 White Collar Advice
Urgent Advice: Avoid These 2 Big Mistakes In Federal Prison
 
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While walking to Georgetown Law School today to lecture, I received an interesting phone call. The call was so interesting I decided to film a short impromptu video only minutes before my lecture at Georgetown was due to begin. The call was from a current federal prisoner at Lewisburg Federal Prison Camp. I learned on our call he was calling me from an iPhone – an iPhone, of course, he is not allowed to have in federal prison. The consequences, if he were caught, is a significant disciplinary infraction. There is no doubt he would go from a minimum security prison to a low-security prison. He would also lose his good time. On our call I listened as he complained about his sentence and experience through federal prison. He lamented that is friends and family didn’t want to visit him and he was utterly lost on the inside. Suffice to say my advice was direct. I encouraged him to immediately give up the iPhone. Further, I encouraged him to try to find some perspective and to recognize that it is a horrific idea to complain about a nine-month federal prison term, especially when good men around him are serving significantly longer sentences. If you will go to federal prison, I know it is not easy. But I encourage you to avoid these two horrific mistakes this federal prisoner made. First never use an iPhone and second do not complain and make matters worse for those that love and support you. Thank you, Justin Paperny P.S. Could my iPhone have been any closer to my face! P.S.S. Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. Start reading about the U Shaped Curve Now and how it will impact your prison term positively. P.S.S.S. I have never done a P.S.S.S. before so I decided to try one now as I post this video from 30,000 feet while flying home from DC.
Views: 1384 White Collar Advice
Why Do Innocent White Collar Defendants Plead Guilty?
 
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Going to federal prison was easier for me to handle because I broke the law. I was guilty. I created victims, hurt my family, ruined my career and more. There was no question I deserved to be held accountable. Unlike me, many defendants who plead guilty are innocent. I share my thoughts on how an innocent white-collar defendant can prepare for his federal sentencing in this video. Best, Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 858 White Collar Advice
How To Prepare For Your Federal Sentencing (David Rosenfield Interview, Herrick Feinstin LLP)
 
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How To Prepare For Your Federal Sentencing White collar defense attorney, David Rosenfield and federal prison consultant, Justin Paperny, discuss how defendants can prepare for their federal sentencing. To see a sample of Do's and Dont's for character reference letters send an email to [email protected] Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison David's sentencing blog will be posted at whitecollaradvice.com on Tuesday, June 13, 2017. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2024 White Collar Advice
Federal Judges Advice On Preparing For Sentencing
 
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Hello, I am Justin Paperny, with White Collar Advice, and Prison Professors. Recently, I partnered with my friends, Michael Santos and Shon Hopwood, who co founded Prison Professors. In this video, Michael Santos interviews Federal Judge Stephen Bough. Judge Bough and Michael discuss, amongst other items: What steps can a defendant take to make a favorable impact at sentencing? What type of weight does Judge Bough put on a defense attorney's statement? How frequently does Judge Bough see defendants invest the time and energy to communicate remorse? Does a restitution payment before sentencing influence Judge Bough? What influence do character reference letters have at sentencing? And more, much more! If you would like help on your narrative simply text the word NARRATIVE to 44222 to grab our free sentencing mitigation report. You can also visit http://www.whitecollaradvice.com/get-best-outcome-sentencing-hearing/ Best, Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 4311 White Collar Advice
How to Avoid Problems in Federal Prison
 
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How to Avoid Problems in Prison that could lead to disciplinary infractions, time in the hole, loss of good time and pain to your loved ones. Visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. Justin Paperny: Hi. It’s Justin Paperny. 20 to 9 on Thursday, February 12th and I want to jump right into a lesson on disciplinary infractions, and actually tied into my ethics career. Two days ago I was lecturing in front of more than a thousand stockbrokers or money managers in New York City, attack my ethics, finance the consequences of white collar crime. And, a journalist put up a piece at WealthManagement.com, highlighting some of the takeaways. In fact he titled this article Eight Life Lessons From A White Collar Criminal, and it's incredible how many of these lessons translate to prison adjustment and life on the inside. For example, one of the quotes from my lecture was one email, one favour, one text, one decision on behalf of a client, the inability to say NO can influence the rest of your life. Well that ethical lesson for these executives applies to incoming prisoners, and I get too many calls from family members and loved ones who learn their husband, or son or daughter is in the shoe for a fight or something that happened on the inside. So, these lessons are timeless; that they never age, and I want to transition to a blog that I wrote all the way back in prison April 13th, 2009 about an experience of an incoming prisoner. A new prisoner had the TV room. I recall watching. It was a Sunday afternoon, Augusta Sunday- the excitement of the back nine. Gang member left the TV room. This new prisoner went in; changed the channel to golf. The gang member came in. He was upset. Turned it back to basketball and exactly as this says, the Tom said this prisoner “But, no one was in here. I wanted to watch golf”, and this gang member said “Don't matter. This TV is for basketball. Don't touch the channel”. And foolishly, this new prisoner responded with “You mean even if no one is in here the channel has to stay on basketball?” And then it got worse, and this new prisoner Tom was reprimanded in front of a bunch of other prisoners. He was embarrassed and foolishly and quietly walked back to his cubicle. He didn't watch football or basketball that day. What Tom didn't understand was how that experience could've influenced the rest of his prison term, because some guys in prison gang members do not care if they fight; do not care if they go to the hole; do not care if they get transferred. Some have been in for 5, 10, 15 and 20 years, and some get a thrill of making a tough run on the new guys. So, that lesson of understanding how one decision or one statement could influence the rest of your life applies both to ethics and the decisions we make in the work environment, and also to prison adjustment. As I transition to a couple of other takeaways from this article, who you surround yourself with matters. visit me: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2763 White Collar Advice
Why I Went to Federal Prison
 
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Why I Went to Federal Prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLds_6LS4OA I believe defendants need to learn how to tell their story. To that end, I share the story of my downfall, and how and why I ended up in federal prison. Justin Paperny shares details on what life is like inside federal prison. If you are a defendant or family member supporting a loved one in trouble, watch this video to ensure the time in prison is productive and free from altercation or unnecessary drama. {Why I Went to Federal Prison} What We Do: White Collar Advice provides a menu of products and services that teach others how they can prepare to make the most of their journey. We cannot change the past for anyone. Yet we absolutely can teach strategies that lead to the conquering of adversity and the restoration of dignity. At White Collar Advice, we provide guidance to empower others who want to tap their strengths, to reclaim their life, to emerge from difficult experiences stronger than anyone would expect. By teaching others about every aspect of the prison system, we show them how they can prepare to minimize the downside and maximize the upside. {Why I Went to Federal Prison} Who We Are & What Differentiates Us: Our service differs from the typical prison consultant. Many so-called prison consultants masquerade as experts, citing time they served as their credential. They sell fear, preying upon people who are more vulnerable than ever. Other prison consultants built careers working as functionaries of the prison system—former prison guards who contributed to the intergenerational failure factories. After leaving the barbed-wire bureaucracies, those former prison guards brand themselves as “prison consultants” and attempt to provide guidance on what individuals should expect while serving time. {Why I Went to Federal Prison} Such individuals have not mastered the challenges associated with confinement. Yet they sell services suggesting that they can advise others. We recognize that many prison consultants are distasteful, bordering on sleazy in their approach to dispensing guidance. Why Are We Different? Rather than offering the boilerplate information that anyone can find online, our programs guide people to success. If a client doesn’t appreciate the coaching and programs we offer, then the client pays nothing. {Why I Went to Federal Prison} Clients and their family members routinely tell us that lessons they learned from White Collar Advice were the greatest value they received through their unfortunate experience. Our products and services do more than prepare individuals for the journey ahead. They also restore the confidence and dignity that the criminal justice system seems designed to extinguish. {Why I Went to Federal Prison} Defense attorneys, criminal defendants, and those who want to learn about mastering the prison system will find White Collar Advice an outstanding resource. In addition to teaching how to prepare for prison, White Collar Advice’s programs teach individuals how to reposition themselves for a successful life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLds_6LS4OA www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs Visit www.FederalPrison101.com for our lesson plan on the first day in federal prison https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice http://federalprisonadvice.com/ https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://web.facebook.com/White-Collar-Advice-1065017870256711/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 12985 White Collar Advice
Prison Consultant, Justin Paperny, Joins The Daily Briefing on Fox News With Dana Perino
 
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Earlier today I had the opportunity to contribute to Dana Perino's show on Fox News Channel. Fox News Channel reached out to me after watching a video I filmed with CBS National News. The purpose of the interview was to discuss the college admissions cheating scandal. As the Washington Post and CNN reported, I am currently very involved in this case. Our goal at White Collar Advice is to help defendants prepare for the shortest possible prison sentence in the most favorable institution. One way to accomplish that goal, if they broke the law and plead guilty, is to own their conduct. They must identify with their victims and demonstrate what they have learned from this experience. Lastly, they must convey why these they will never return to another courtroom. I discuss some of these thoughts with Dana Perino, amongst other topics. I will be returning Fox News, amongst other media outlets in the coming days. Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 1483 White Collar Advice
Getting Sentenced to Federal Prison?
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] Justin Paperny addresses 11 questions defendants must ask and answer before they are sentenced in federal court. . Justin Paperny: Hi. It’s Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice. I was at the zoo over the weekend and while watching my daughter's obsession with flamingos and these other beautiful animals I got a call from a defendant who is to be sentenced today. And I couldn't get over how unprepared he was for the sentencing hearing. I just couldn't believe it. So, I had this dilemma do I detract from, you know, my daughter's obsession with the flamingos or help this person, because he was so unprepared. I stepped away, I helped him and thinking that others could benefit I'm going to film this video on 11 things the defendants have to do before their sentencing hearing. Okay, so I’m going to use this blog of White Collar Advice; is a small guide. Number one, before your sentencing, is your presentence report accurate? You'd be surprised how many defendants do not have an accurate PSR. The PSR has to be accurate. It's called the Bible in prison for a reason. It can impact how much halfway house time you have, the program that you can enrol in. There are so many things to prepare for. I have gotten calls from defendants who had said ‘Justin I didn't really prepare for the PSR, because my 36 months or 48 months sentence was a formality.’ And then they realize that even though the judge was going to rubberstamp the agreement with a US attorney that it can influence the prison that they go to, the programs they participate in, not properly disclosing evidence of substance abuse or health issues, how can impact the job in prison etc. So, when I spoke with this defendant on Saturday his PSR report was inaccurate in part, because he completed a year ago. And, it's a static; excuse me, the PSR is a dynamic document. If you complete it and there are changes that take place in your life cooperation, substance abuse, medical or health issues etc. it's a document that should work to be updated, and this defendant was getting sentenced today based on a document that didn’t reflect the accuracy of his life because there were so many changes in part because he wasn't prepared for the interview. I mean, here's our lesson plan on the PSR. Look at the questions that we believe a white collar advice you should begin to go through. This is just one part of how we prepare – the background, the family, your physical condition, mental and emotional health, substance abuse, education etc. Now, you might look at the PSR form, and I’ve had defendants say to me ‘Justin they don't ask me that many questions. They don't ask everything per say. So, you want to have the ability to articulate it, to express it, to get into the details of your life and your background, mental health issues or substance. So, we believe a fully prepared you should be able to easily answer these questions. Visit me at: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 4324 White Collar Advice
10 Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison
 
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10 Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9BowHBJ_-w 10 Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison - Justin Paperny explains 10 benefits to serving time in federal prison. Justin Paperny: I [inaudible] White Collar 101 series and I want to talk today about some of the benefits of serving time in federal prison. Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison I am not going to diminish that serving time in prison is tough sometimes. The hardest part of the journey is before you actually surrender to prison- you're living in a limbo for quite some time, the fear of the unknown and going to Google or other spots, you know, to find information; can be very discouraging because it tends to focus on all the negatives of a felony conviction, and I spent too much time before my surrender to prison obsessing about all that had gone wrong. And it took a little while for me to figure out some of the benefits to serving time in federal prison. So, that's what I want to convey in this video, and I was inspired because I began working with someone new today, who through his research in Google and vetting various consultants, came across this blog I wrote going back to 2014, 21st of August 2014 and entitled the 10 benefits to serving time in federal prison. Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison So, I’m going to go through this quickly and, you know, I hope that it's a value to you wherever you might be in the journey. Never forget, a prison term is clearly defined with the beginning and an end. Before you go in can be the toughest part into the extent that you can prepare for and manage of the ups and downs of the journey it will be much easier, and I do this in part, because I regretted some of the decisions I made before I went in, and I just hope that the work that I put out there helps you make better decisions. And, if you go to prison, then your journey is more productive. So, in my case I wrote #1- Victims. I never forgot that my conduct help create victims. I was a stockbroker UBS. I made some bad decisions while managing money created some victims, and even though they have been repaid it didn’t change the emotional stress that they had gone through. So, a benefit to me in prison was recognizing I created these victims and then putting measurable steps in place to make amends to them, beyond just words, but through my action. Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison #2- Take a punch. In my book lessons from prison that I'll happily give to you for free; there's no need to buy the book, just go to federalprisonofvice.com- you get a free copy; I talk about the privilege in coddled upbringing that I had had, frankly much different than a lot of the great men that I served time in prison with, who endured a heartache and disadvantages that I have never faced. And until I went to prison, I’d never really taken a punch in life. So, serving time in prison, working hard, I think I proved to a lot of people that I can emerge strong; that I can take a punch and come back. Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9BowHBJ_-w https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice http://federalprisonadvice.com/ https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://web.facebook.com/White-Collar-Advice-1065017870256711/ https://www.instagram.com/whitecollaradvice/ www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Benefits To Serving Time In Federal Prison
Views: 11597 White Collar Advice
Federal Prison Camp Versus a Low Security Prison
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] Justin Paperny & Michael Santos discuss the differences between a federal prison camp and low security prison. Justin Paperny: Hi everyone. This is Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice and today I’m going to talk with my mentor and colleague Michael Santos. Michael, many of the clients by way of White Collar Advice end up at a federal prison camp, somehow ever do go to a low and there are many questions about the differences between a low and a camp. You, of course served 26 consecutive years in prison of all security levels, including a low and a camp. So, on the top of your mind are there any significant differences that you can share with our viewers? Michael Santos: Absolutely. There is a big difference between a low and a camp. As you mentioned, I served time in prison of every security level and I can tell you every security level where you drop there is a huge difference. Now, that doesn’t mean that at individual can’t live a life of meaning and relevance regardless of where he or she is confined, but there are big differences between security levels. With a low, a problem that a lot of people have is they have this misperception that it is dangerous. Now, the reality is, it’s dangerous living out here in society. It doesn’t matter where you are you're always vulnerable. You're always living with people and although you can control your own behaviour, you can't control the behaviour of other people. Okay, but in a low there are a number of people who could very easily serve their time in a camp. The only reason that they're in a low is because a lot of times is because either they are an immigrant and not a US citizen, and so they would be in a camp, but their citizenship precludes them or they were convicted of a crime that has such a high dollar amount that requires them to have a longer sentences. So, they are serving time inside of offense because the release date is beyond 10 years away. That said anyone who is inside of a low can really find more opportunities that exist in a camp. You see, a camp generally has a population of between hundred people on the sparsely populated camp to as many as 1000 people at a big camp like Maxwell in Alabama. Most lows are going to have populations of 1000 to 2000 people inside of one institution, one facility, and as a consequence of them having 2000 people you can expect there are going to be a lot more programs and a lot more activities to pursue in a low. So, that's a huge advantage for people. When you have 2000 people around you, you will always find somebody that you can connect to, somebody that you can be friends with. There is just such a wide variety of people. When I was in a camp I was with Wall Street bankers, I was with medical doctors, with surgeons, with entrepreneurs, with well-educated people, and I was with gang members. visit me at: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 36740 White Collar Advice
Residential Drug Abuse Program (RDAP)
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Justin Paperny shares strategies to earn up to 18-months off your prison sentence. My baseball coach at USC loved to say with a proven process comes predictable results. Now, think about anything you’ve done successfully in life and been able to repeat with these, perhaps is your golf swing, or growing your business. With anything you’ve done well, you’ve created a process. At White Collar Advice our proven process has produced predictable results since 2008, when I got into this business. This process of ours won’t just ensure that you get accepted into the residential drug abuse program, but that you actually complete the program. After all, as many as 50% of white collar defendants and some prisons quit or get thrown out of the program, or are forced to retake one of the three phases. So, if you have interest in succeeding through this program, and can visualize and you’re willing to work towards an outcome that can get you home up to 18 months sooner, let my team and I of White Collar Advice prepare and educate you on the coveted residential drug abuse program. Recently I received a call from Alice. Her husband John, a former doctor, is serving 60 months in prison for insurance fraud. Now, shortly before Alice called me, she said she had received a call from John and received some terrible and distressing news. Despite trying, John had finally and officially been told that he was denied access into the residential drug abuse program. As a result, he was serving extra year in prison. Apparently, I learned from Alice that upon his surrender, John finally learned about the residential drug abuse program. From there of course, he took aggressive steps, including retaining a consultant from the inside to try to get in. So, wanting to learn more about their case, knowing that we can learn from failure as much as success and with Alice's permission to interview her I’m going to share this story with all of you. And through my interview I learnt that John in his pre-sentence investigation failed to disclose that he had been a drinker for many years. He drank before his arrest, as well he even smoke marijuana and didn’t disclose any of it. As is the case with so many white collar offenders, John was afraid and felt that opening up about his substance and alcohol use would make him appear unfavorably before the court, the prosecutor, the judge- all of the stakeholders. He simply believed that had he opened up about it, it would lead to further complications and also I learn he was just too embarrassed to talk about it. He put his family through enough; he was going to prison; now he had to talk about a substance abuse- it was just too much to bear. He just chose to stay quiet. And, as I just mentioned upon his surrender he learned about RDAP. And he learned had he honestly disclosed his issues and collected the proper evidence, he would have qualified, and based on the length of his sentence he would have been released from prison 18 months early.
Views: 2845 White Collar Advice
9 Tips To Master Your Second Day In Federal Prison
 
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9 Tips To Master Your Second Day In Federal Prison Blogs mentioned in video: http://www.whitecollaradvice.com/mornings-in-prison-master-mornings-in-federal-prison/ http://www.whitecollaradvice.com/understanding-your-tendencies-in-federal-prison/ Text the word QUICKLY to 44222 for a free copy of my new book, How To Master Federal Prison Quickly. You can also get the new book here: http://www.whitecollaradvice.com/master-federal-prison/ Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California In this video, I share 9 tips all prisoners should follow during their second day in federal prison.
Views: 948 White Collar Advice
Don't Interview For RDAP Without This
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California The 8 core attitudes of the residential drug abuse program.
Views: 763 White Collar Advice
Going To Federal Prison? Avoid New Year's Resolutions
 
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Federal Prison Camp: Avoid New Year's Resolutions Justin Paperny shares why pursuing daily, incremental goals in a federal prison camp is more valuable than New Year's Resolutions. Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a complimentary copy of Lessons From Prison. Or visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com. Text SOCRATES to 44222 for updated course on how to get out of federal prison up to 24-months early. Call/text Justin at 818-424-2220 with any questions. He promises he will not tell you at you!! [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 384 White Collar Advice
6 Bad Habits I Quit In Federal Prison
 
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Following a lecture at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business on September 14, 2018, a student asked me to identify some bad habits I quit or stopped in federal prison. There is no doubt that one benefit of my federal prison sentence was breaking free of some bad habits that were holding me back. I welcome the question from the student and I thought it would make for a good video. If you are going to federal prison you may not need to make any changes. I know that I did. If you would like to make some improvements or cancel/form some new habits I hope this video helps you. I wish you well on your journey! Best, Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 1348 White Collar Advice
White Collar 101: Succeed Through Federal Prison Camp
 
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Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison, or visit www.federalprisonadvice.com. Questions: text or call 818-424-2220. How To Succeed Through Federal Prison Camp: Justin Paperny, author of Lessons From Prison and Ethics in Motion shares his insights on how defendants can succeed through federal prison. Several years have passed since I surrendered to TAFT federal prison camp. I offer my book to anyone who wishes to know more of the details, but for the interest of time I’ll provide the thumbnail sketch of my story in just one paragraph. After graduating from the University of Southern California, I became a stockbroker. And, while working in that capacity I represented professional athletes and hedge funds. When I learned that one of my hedge fund clients was involved in fraudulent transactions, I failed to act appropriately. Authorities responded with a criminal investigation. Again, I failed to act appropriately. Now, rather than accept responsibility for my bad decisions, I lied, lived in denial and misled. As a consequence I faced civil charges from the SEC; then I faced criminal charges. The ordeal lasted nearly three and a half years costing me more than a million dollars, and culminating into an 18-month prison term that I served to TAFT federal prison camp. If you’re watching, I suspect you’re in a similar situation. Now, our crimes might be different. I pled guilty to securities fraud. But the situation is the same. You are going through the worst time of your life. You are waiting for an attorney to make decisions on your behalf. Judicial delays keep your life in a constant state of limbo. The process can bring emotional torment, as you contemplate how this tragedy will influence your family, your career, your reputation, your future, and on top of all of that you have to worry about prison. At White Collar Advice we can help. I’m pleased to tell you the worst part of this experience are the months that proceed confinement. Before my surrender I was completely lost. As soon as I created a plan however, my life changed. I emerged from prison on August 16th 2009. As a consequence of the preparations I made, I walked out of prison as a completely different man. Preparation restored my confidence opening new opportunities. I share this story with you for a purpose. Whether you choose to work with me or not, I want you to know that the sooner you begin to strategically prepare for better outcome in life, the sooner you can restore confidence. With renewed confidence you’ll stop the free falling and sleepless nights. With renewed confidence you’ll work more openly with your lawyer, work to manage your reputation, mitigate your sentence, and in so doing forge a path that will lead to a new future. But, you cannot succeed without hard work. As I wrote in lessons from prison, it takes daily incremental action. Look, in prison I had a really disciplined schedule. I woke before dawn each day to begin my work, each day I sat alone at a table with a pen in hand determined to write the next chapter of my life. Now, in addition to my book, which I will happily send to you, I wrote daily blogs by hand. Visit:[email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 5968 White Collar Advice
How To Grow Your Support Network In Federal Prison
 
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It is one thing to talk about it, it is another thing to do it. My mentor and business partner, Michael Santos, mastered 26 years in federal prison. He wrote books, built million dollar businesses, got married and he mentored tens of thousands of prisoners. I was fortunate and grateful to learn from him. Now you can learn from him too! In this video, Michael and I discuss how to grow and nurture your network from federal prison. Listen, takes notes, then implement Michael's strategies and ideas. If you do you will have a smoother and more productive federal prison term. To get a free copy of our new book, Mastering Prison Quickly, text QUICKLY to 44222. Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of my book, Lessons From Prison. Be well and work hard. Justin Paperny [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 425 White Collar Advice
9 SMART Things White Collar Defendants Do
 
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January 8, 2019 Do you know what smart white collar defendants do? I do! In my experience as a white collar defendant, federal prisoner and federal prison consultant, I have identified nine specific things that white collar defendants do on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. If you want to be successful you should do them too. Some of these smart decisions include, -Recognizing this is harder on your family -Focus on what you can control -Done is better than perfect -Begin with the end in mind -Ask tough questions -Focus on resources you have before, during and after federal prison and more The key to making progress is implementation. It is a good start watching this video. The key, however, is implementation. You must measure your progress. You must know when to pivot and make changes. Without action we have nothing. In this video, 9 Smart Things White Collar Defendants Do, I reference two blogs. The links follow: https://www.whitecollaradvice.com/9-smart-things-white-collar-defendants-do/ and https://www.whitecollaradvice.com/understanding-your-tendencies-in-federal-prison/ If you have questions after watching this video please call or text me at 818-424-2220. Thank you, Justin Paperny P.S. If you would like to read my book, Lessons From Prison, text the word LIBERTY to 44222. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 1181 White Collar Advice
How Your Presentence Report Can Lead To A Shorter Federal Prison Term
 
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Experience as a federal prison consultant tells me too many white collar defendants fail to invest the time to prepare for their presentence interview properly. If you have an interest in preparing differently and mastering your presentence interview this video, How Your Presentence Report Can Lead To A Shorter Federal Prison Term, and our free course at www.WhiteCollarAdvice.com/PSR, will help you. The reality is too many white collar defense attorneys do not prepare their clients for their PSR--other than telling them to tell the truth. Your presentence report will influence your the length of your federal prison sentence and your time in prison. It is in your interest to prepare and take action. Again, this video I filmed with Michael Santos will help you. You should also grab our free course, which we are giving away for a limited time. If you have immediate questions or concerns please call me at 818-424-2220. Thank you, Justin Paperny Author of Lessons From Prison & Ethics in Motion [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 658 White Collar Advice
How To Find The Best Federal Prison
 
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How To Find The Best Federal Prison https://youtu.be/Tyy5oij4md4 Interested what federal prison you should ask for at your sentencing? Wondering what day you should surrender to federal prison? If so, you should invest in White Collar Advice's federal sentencing tool. In this video, Justin Paperny, does a demonstration of the calculator. Prepare for prison by grabbing Justin's book Lessons From Prison for free. Simply text the word LIBERTY to 44222. Visit:[email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Hi, everyone. It is Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice, and today I'm going to do a short demonstration of our federal sentencing tool which will help you pick the best possible prison and surrender on the date of your choosing, and if you pick the best date, you can serve up to six fewer days in prison. We're at the White Collar Advice site. To access the tool, we go to Sentencing Tool, here's the page to buy the tool, both for individual defendants and also for law firms. Under Courses, and all of my private clients and members of my Blueprint Program have access to the Federal Sentencing tool on the back end at whitecollaradvice.com. Let's click on the Federal Sentencing Tool. Let's just say your sentencing date is May 20th, which just happens to be my release date from prison. May 20th, and we can use ranges, but we'll say your exact sentence is two years. We'll do a zip code with 10001, minimum security camp, we'll give you credit for one day on the inside. Let's analyze the data. Now, as you know, I like to reference data because it makes me feel smart. 74% of recommendations, according to the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, in 2015 was followed by the government. For example, let's look at Otisville. Otisville currently has capacity of 120, population of 115. Most of the time, Otisville has population of 119, 120. What's relevant here is that I have received many calls over the years from defendants who had asked for Otisville and they didn't get it and they were re-designated elsewhere to like Fairton or Schuylkill, and they didn't understand, they didn't know why, because they said, "Well, I asked for it." Well, the problem was there was no room at the time. There was no space for them. How To Find The Best Federal Prison Use this tool to identify what prisons are in your area, how close is it to your home, what is the likelihood based on the population and capacity you're actually going to get it. I'm frequently getting calls from, I believe, McKean and Hazelton and other federal prison camps that have been asked for and the defendants don't get it and they're frustrated. When I tell them, "Of course you're not going to get it, there's no room there," it makes a lot of sense. The downside is you've wasted your recommendation, and second, you get rerouted to a prison that you just have absolutely zero interest in going to. Another benefit of this tool is you can decide if you want to go to a big or small federal prison camp, and there are pros and cons to each. Now that I say that, that is a great topic that I should do a video on, the pros and cons of the big and small federal prison camp. Pardon my digression, let's get back to the sentencing tool. Use the tool to pick the location that's best for you. Okay? Based on a sentencing date of May 20th, August 31st of '17 would be the best day to surrender. You'd serve 631 days on the inside, good behavior days stays the same. Further, you can go all the way down to, I want to say 634 days. How To Find The Best Federal Prison Look at this data. I just happened to pick a date that was May 20th. That gets you out three days early. It can do as long as six days. Look, I've always said three, four, five, six days early or getting out of prison early is not the game changer of the century, but you know what? It's fewer days in federal prison. It's less time that you're going to be standing for count and chomping in the [commerce 00:03:43] area. Use this tool, leverage off it to your advantage, and get home sooner. Okay. Any questions on our Federal Sentencing Tool, you can call me at 184-242-2220, or if you have interest in investing in the tool, computer's loading, go to whitecollaradvice.com. I'm confident you'll find value in the tool. If not, send me an email. I'll send you your money back. You have absolutely no downside here. Either way, you win. I just get so many calls from defendants who regret how they prepared and end up at a prison that they didn't choose. It just adds on to the list of regrets.
Views: 2270 White Collar Advice
Do My Sentencing Preparations Really Matter? (federal prison camp)
 
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Do My Sentencing Preparations Really Matter? (federal prison camp) https://youtu.be/RogddD22y9c What if the judge could care less about your efforts to{ Sentencing Preparations )prepare for sentencing? Justin Paperny shares his thoughts in this video. Questions? Text or call 818-424-2220 Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison or visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com Visit www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Sentencing Preparations Hi everyone. I'm Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice. It's very good to be with you. Today I'm going to talk about Do Your Efforts Really Matter? I want to do this video, in part, because I received a call this morning from a defendant in North Carolina, actually not far from Wake Forest University, where I've done some speaking in the past. This defendant called after watching a video I filmed last year called 10 Ways to Get More Time in Prison and in that video I talked about if you don't accept responsibility, or disclose your substance abuse, or if you continue to spend really aggressively, if you owe restitution, if you don't engage in volunteer work, if you don't work openly with your lawyer, so I identified 10 things that I think could lead to a longer term in prison. This defendant said to me, "Look I'm not doing a lot of these things that you talk about, but here's my concern. I'm not sure that it's going to work." He had said that to me after I suggested that he engage my colleague, Michael Santos, who does a lot of the narrative writing for my clients. I said, "What do you mean that it won't work?" He said, "Well, my concern is that I cultivate my network, that I get character reference letters, that I work with you and Michael on a narrative, that I save up to pay some restitution and so on, and that it doesn't work. And that the day that the judge sentences me, none of it means anything. And all of that work is for naught." So we have to embrace some realities. Here are some realities. You're only going to get sentenced once, so to a degree it's impossible to know exactly what could happen, because you're only going to get sentenced once. So I told this defendant and I tell all of you, it should be your goal that as you stand up before the judge, that you're able to tell yourself and your family, "There's nothing more I could have done to prepare for this moment, regardless of what the number might be," because I would never guarantee or insinuate that a specific outcome will happen by doing this work. I believe that better things will come from cultivating your network, from generating best in class character reference letters, through expressing through your own efforts why you're worthy of the best outcome. I believe volunteer work, in giving back to your community, shows that it's more than just about you and I believe and have done this long enough to know that those efforts have certainly helped a number of our clients, and frankly, people that aren't my clients who don't come across my work, some defendants really do these things. But again, I told him, and I told all of you, you can choose to do nothing because you're convinced that it won't matter and indeed there were a number of really great guys in prison who would say, "Justin, the judges don't read your letters, the judge's mind is made up, the day of sentencing I don't think he reads the sentencing memorandums, the letters. I don't think volunteer work matters. I think it's very much a formality." There are a number of people in prison who will say that to you. This defendant this morning was alluding to that. He was looking for me to tell him something that would give him a greater level of comfort. Sentencing Preparations Look, I've had clients say to me that I could be maybe more aggressive in expressing the benefits of preparing, that's just not really my style. I'm very causal, I offer advice, but I don't aggressively say, "Hire me, hire me, hire me." I just don't do that. So I said to him, "You have to use your judgment. You have to decide if creating this narrative, of expressing to the judge who you are, of articulating the lessons learned, of growing your network and asking them to write letters on your behalf is in your interest. If scaling back your lifestyle a bit, so your pre-sentence report shows that, you know, you are committed to paying back some restitution, if making a restitution payment could help you. I believe making a restitution payment can help you, there's so guarantee. I've gotten calls from people who have paid back nine million in restitution, they still get eight years in prison."
Views: 831 White Collar Advice
Why Do People Serve Time In Federal Prison?
 
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Why Do People Serve Time In Federal Prison? Federal Prison Consultant and author, Justin Paperny, shares how and why white collar executives could end up serving time in federal prison or a federal prison camp. If you have questions, simply text or call 818-424-2220. To get a copy of Lessons From Prison text LIBERTY to 44222. Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Hi, this is Justin [inaudible 00:00:01] today I'm going to spend a few minutes talking about why people go to federal prison. The idea for this video came from two calls I had this morning. This morning I received a phone call from a student at USC. I lecture at USC 15 times a year and my book Ethics in Motion is required reading in the business school. This student purchased the book, and then called me to ask if I could ship the book to a different address. I said sure. Before I got off the phone with him he said, "I know you're going to discuss this in class but I'm curious, why did you go to prison?" I said, "Well, talk more about that next week." 20 minutes after that, I received a phone call from a defendant, a doctor on the east coast who's surrendering to prison in a month. For about 20 minutes, I sat back and listened to this doctor essentially blame everybody else but himself for his plight in life. He blamed his lawyer, he blamed his lawyer, he blamed his wife, he blamed his kids, then he defaulted to the cooperator, the rat, the snitch, the guy who dropped the dime. All of the prison parlance as if he's been in jail for two decades. I said, "Well, why are you going to prison?" He said, "It's this snitch. How many times I gotta tell you?" I said, "Walk me through anything that you did wrong?" He basically said to me, "How many times do I have to tell you? I didn't do anything wrong. I only took a deal because I had to because some snitch cooperated against me." I figured I would spend a few minutes telling all of you as I tried to tell this doctor why people go to prison and it actually ties into the lecture that I'll give at my alma mater at USC next week. People go to prison, presuming they're guilty, because they succumb to the very boring and accounting type term called the fraud triangle. Stick with me for a second. Anyone that's ever been prison, has succumbed to this fraud triangle that includes pressure, rationalization and opportunity. If you're going to prison or if you're crossing the line, whether it's a drug crime or a sex crime or a white collar crime, you have succumb to this triangle. I encourage all of you as you uncover the actions that led you into trouble to work through your own triangle. Let's quickly decipher it in my case. The pressure in my case before I facilitated a crime, I felt pressure because my senior business partner didn't recognize me for my hard work. I felt pressure to produce from UBS, who gave my partner and I a million dollar bonus and I saw they were beginning to fire brokers who weren't proving worthy of the bonus. Letting them go for supposedly ethical violations, but we knew they were getting fired because they weren't producing. We felt, or at least I felt pressure to prove worthy of the bonus. That's one part of the prong, pressure. The rationalization. I began to rationalize that unless I ... If I didn't begin to cheat or take shortcuts, I wouldn't be able to hit my numbers. I began to rationalize that others in my office were engaged in the same type of deceitful behavior and they were advancing and getting bonuses. They helped me fell better on days when I knew I was doing something wrong. The rationalizations are toxic. You're rationalizing lies. The pressure to prove worthy of the bonus, to be recognized from my partner. Rationalizing that UBS is essentially encouraging me to behave this way, that others are involved in the same conduct. You can not close the fraud triangle without opportunity. The opportunity in my case was to do work with a fraudulent hedge fund manager. I had 600 clients and more than 200 million under management, but it was one client on the 16th of June, 2002, I accepted his account. The opportunity for me to get my production up and to prove worthy of this bonus that I felt pressure about was to work with this unethical, dishonest hedge fund manager. Pressure, rationalization, and opportunity.
Views: 1590 White Collar Advice
Federal Prison Camp Versus Federal Prison Transit ||federal prison camp montgomery
 
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Federal Prison Camp Versus Federal Prison Transit Federal Prison Camp: Justin Paperny and Michael Santos compare life in federal prison camp to life in federal prison transit. Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison Resuorces : www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Federal Prison Camp Justin Paperny: Hi. I'm Justin Paperny and I'm here today with my good friend and colleague, Michael Santos. We're going to talk about life in transit. Welcome Michael, and can we jump right in with some of the massive differences that exist between life in a federal prison camp and life in federal prison transit? Michael Santos: Sure. A federal prison camp is equivalent to doing time inside of a corporate environment. What I mean by that is there can be problems, but they're unlikely to happen, okay? You were in a federal prison camp at Taft. There were about 500 people there. Out of those 500 people, I would submit that maybe 100, 150, are, what you would call, normal people. They're the people that live in your neighborhood, they're the people that work in your environment. But there's going to be another 350 people there that are different. {Federal Prison Camp} When you get out of that camp environment, those ratios shift, okay? It's getting to be significantly higher, from 150 to 350, to more like ... You're going to be around 10 people out of 500. And 490 people are going to be ... 10 people are going to be people that you would live around, and be around. There's going to be 490 of those people who only want to go through life based- Justin Paperny: What types of people? Are we talking murderers, rapists? Any type of offender from the penitentiary down to the camp? Michael Santos: [crosstalk 00:01:21]. That's what I said. When you get into that environment, you're around every population level. You're around every security level. Because the [inaudible 00:01:31] prisons operates as a machine. So when it's in transit, everybody's mixed together, okay? Justin Paperny: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Michael Santos: Everybody's mixed together as parts of the [inaudible 00:01:42]. If you're a minimum security prisoner, when you get into a place that you're going to be in for a couple of weeks, you may get segregated into a separate housing unit that only houses minimum and low security prisoners. But there are going to be times when you're in a cell block with 500 people, and some of them are serving life sentences from a [USP 00:02:05], okay? You may be in that block for 10 hours, 12 hours. And it's very tense because it's like sardines in a can. And it's fundamentally different from anything you've experienced in the camp. And that's a very good reason for you to be helping your clients understand. Hey, understand the rules, understand why it's important to abide by those rules, and try to minimize your exposure to these more volatile environments. {Federal Prison Camp} Justin Paperny: I know it can be a wide ranging answer ... On average, at least in your experience, how long were you in transit, for example, when you went from the low down to the camp? Is it three days? Is it three weeks? Could it be all of those options? Michael Santos: So generally, if you're going to a camp, you will get a furlough transfer. That means that you transfer yourself. That's a local decision. That's going to depend on the warden, on whether the warden grants those furlough transfers. But I would say it's 50/50, that you can get a furlough transfer. If you don't get a furlough transfer, it can take 60 days to get from a secure institution to a minimum security camp. It can take 90 to 120 days to get from a minimum security camp to a low security prison. Because if you get transferred for disciplinary reasons, they're in a rush to get you there. Justin Paperny: And, when I was in the federal prison camp, I had access to the phones every day, presuming that I had enough phone minutes left. While in transit, are there days where you might not have access to the telephone? I'm asking because, if not, we want to prepare families, let them know there could be days without hearing from their loved one. So what is the access level to phone, and email, and those sorts of things? Michael Santos: Well it depends where you are, okay? When you were in prison it was different from now. Now many of the prisons have access to the email system. {Federal Prison Camp}
Views: 816 White Collar Advice
Dating After Federal Prison:White Collar 101
 
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Dating After Federal Prison :White Collar 101: https://youtu.be/NdroijfsBoA Justin Paperny discusses dating after a federal prison term. Should you talk about going to prison? Should you discuss it in person, through email, phone? What are the common emotions you can expect to hear? Will they hate it, love it, not care? Succeeding after prison begins with succeeding before prison and during prison. Grab a free copy of Lessons From Prison now to get started. We have the proven program--you just need to commit to investing the time and energy to prepare. Justin Paperny Dating After Federal Prison To be or not be’ is the opening line in Shakespeare's Hamlet. We are not talking of Hamlet today, though I will steal from that and say to tell or not tell, as it related to dating after federal prison. I am going to share my experience and some of the experiences of my clients. So, let’s get started. Dating After Federal Prison It’s Justin Paperny at White Collar Advice and today we’re going to talk about dating after prison. Now, I've been told by a number of really great clients my experience was easier, because I went to federal prison and I did not have children. And there's a lot of truth in that. I was 33 when I went to prison. I was single. So there is some truth to that. Incarceration is harder on your family and your loved ones and even though you're the one serving time it is harder on those that love and support you, namely your wife, your children, your husband. Dating After Federal Prison So, I get that, but on the flip side, while many of us go to prison divorced or single, or not married, we come home and we want to rebuild our life. We want to get this experience behind us and I believe a huge part of that, next phase of succeeding post-prison including relationships, well really is, you know go back to how well you did before you went to prison, and certainly what you did in prison, because when it comes up you want to be able to speak about it proudly and articulate- how hard you worked while away and how the experience didn't beat you down. And rather than run to clichés like, okay, what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, it would be a value I think to be able to articulate a very coherent realistic way what the experience did to you, what you’ve learned from it and how are you becoming better. And, I worked hard in prison to prepare for that when I came home, knowing that at 33 I want to date and rebuild my life. Dating After Federal Prison Many, many months, like a year or so ago I did an interview with Esquire magazine. I frankly totally forgot that I done it and someone was released from prison and they call me. And they’re like, hey bud, I read about your quotes in Esquire magazine. I said tell me about it. He said, you are talking about dating. Then he actually sent me the magazine. Now, it is in this Esquire magazine, with Rock on the cover, talking about dating after prison. So, we are talking. He is like you know, I have a successful business, I have money, I am divorced. I was never really that happy about going to prison; not like anyone’s happy to go to prison. He didn’t think he was guilty and he take a plea, simply because he thought he’d get his ass into too much trouble. Dating After Federal Prison [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Dating After Federal Prison
Views: 1286 White Collar Advice
Top 10 Federal Prison Camp Checklist: White Collar 101
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] White Collar 101: Top 10 Federal Prison Surrender Checklist - Justin Paperny shares insights and strategies to surrender to federal prison successfully, and to make best use of your prison experience. Hi. This is Justin Paperny back with another white-collar one-on-one video. Today we’re going to talk about our Top 10 checklist before surrendering to federal prison. I didn’t have this checklist before I surrendered to TAFT federal prison camp in April 2008. As many of you might know if you read my book lessons from prison, I wasn't really that willing to preparer; I was living in denial. And rather than preparing or going through a valuable checklist, I was gorging myself at restaurants like Tito’s tacos, which is a landmark here in Los Angeles, playing a lot of golf, doing everything but really to prepare for the inevitable, which was that I was going to be surrendering to prison. So, I do these videos and I do this work in part because I want people to be better prepared than me, because too many defendants going to the prison system are totally blind, and hopefully a video like this helps remove some of the anxieties that come with surrendering. And I know the anxiety, because I've been there. So, I want to help. So, let’s go to detail number one. Surrender details. If you’re surrendering to prison, you better make sure that you're ready. What do you need? First and foremost make sure the receiving prison has your pre-sentence investigation. Make sure they have your paperwork. Simply ask your lawyer to call the prison to confirm they have it. If they don't, they can hold you in segregation or the shoe until they actually receive it. They have to confirm you’re classified in the correct prison, you’re designated there, and your paperwork will certainly help. So, we want to make sure they have your paperwork. If your lawyer is non-responsive or unwilling to call, then you’re going to have to take some matters into your own hand. I can help; I can offer you some advice, but frankly your lawyer should be willing to make that call presuming you are in a good standing and you ask them to. I don’t think it’s a huge request frankly. Now, couple of other points on the surrender. Get there a few hours early. So, if it says 2 o’clock, get there at 11 o’clock to ensure you are there before the guards; have a shift. You don’t have to worry about speeding. There are a lot of tickets that are given in some of these prison towns with cops just waiting, knowing people are going to be getting to the prison. So, get there preferably early and make sure they have your paperwork. And money- I’ll put up an address here. Do not surrender with money. You want it to either send it to Western Union or send it to the address in Iowa. That Western Union will take two to four hours, so you can do it that same day, or if you’re going to do it through the regular, you know mail, and send it to the address in Iowa it will take just a couple of days. Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 7722 White Collar Advice
White Collar 101: How to Succeed on Federal Probation
 
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www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for free book/ 818-424-2220/ [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Prison Consultant, Justin Paperny, shares a quick strategy to get off to a great start on Federal Probation. Hi. It’s Justin Paperny. I am packing up to head up to Omaha, Nebraska to lecture for Mutual of Omaha. But, before I hit the road, I wanted to quickly share thoughts on a call I just received from a white collar offender, who has been home from prison for a little bit. And, this offender, who served a couple of years for attacks crime was complaining endlessly about the problem that he is having on federal probation. I’ll admit it was a little depressing to hear, though I have a great deal of empathy, because I know how hard prison is- I was there. And I know probation can be difficult, because I was on federal probation for three years. So, after about 10 minutes, I politely cut this gentleman off and asked him to explain to me steps that he took in prison to convey to his Sunday probation officer that he was different than his tax fraud, and steps that he had taken while on federal probation to convince him that he was worthy of liberty. And apparently, he didn’t like those questions, because he quickly pivoted and got back into his story of the probation officer constantly breathing down his neck; he doesn't trust him; he’s always having to fill out financial documents, and he said which I so hate to hear ‘I wish I would've just stayed in prison’. Now look, I had a lot of people tell me that I would rather finish, a lot of people had told me they’d rather finish their federal prison term in prison than go to the halfway house. That I get, but to imply that federal probation is worse than federal prison is an outrageous statement. It's not true by any measure. So, rather than saying outlandish things like he should’ve stayed in prison, I’m really trying to hone in on anything positive he had done while in prison to convey to his probation officer that he’d be easy to supervise. Certainly, probation officers have a heavy docket, and the last thing they want to do is throw you back in prison, though some conspiracy theorists would disagree with me. My time on probation though me at first they’re going to be tough; they’re going to visit the home; they’re going to make sure that you are transparent in your financials, that you are doing as you are supposed to do. Then if you do, they’re going to focus on other priorities. I should tell you however, that I really set the record straight. Excuse me. I got off to a good start on probation as a result of the work that I put in in prison. As many of you know, I documented the journey through a daily blog; certainly I could direct my probation officer to that blog. I was committed to transparency through that blog and not blaming others for my conduct; rather showing lessons that I was learning as a result of going to prison.
Views: 1626 White Collar Advice
12 Books You Must Read In Federal Prison
 
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12 Books You Must Read In Federal Prison Are you going to federal prison? Are you wondering how to create a positive routine to help overcome the obstacles that await you? If you want to succeed, reading great books will help you get on track. The 12 books I share in this video will you succeed through federal prison or a federal prison camp. Visit WhiteCollarAdvice.com or text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. Questions/comments: Text/call 818-424-2220 Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California Hi, everyone. Justin Paperny coming to you from a very rainy Los Angeles on Sunday, January 22nd, my birthday. I was privileged to spend the morning with my beautiful wife and baby girl and now, while they're relaxing and my beautiful daughter's taking a nap, I'm going to film this video. Over breakfast this morning, my wife said, "What were you doing on your birthday in prison?" I said, "Well, I was probably writing," and I actually have a blog up that I wrote from prison on the 22nd of January 2009, where I talked a little bit about maintaining perspective from prison. Indeed, throughout my prison term. I formed many of those perspectives through reading incredible, wonderful books. Philosophers for a thousand and 2,000 years, their words still live today for a reason. I get frustrated at times when defendants will say, "Well, I'm bored in prison. What do I do all day and what do I do to pass the time?" You have the greatest teachers in the world right in front of you through that library in federal prison or through books that your friends or family may send to you. Today, I'm going to talk about 12 books that every federal defendant should read. Now, one of those books is not 'Lessons From Prison.' It would be incredibly self-serving to say that my book should be on that list. It is not but while I'm talking about my book, you should read my book 'Lessons From Prison' and implement some of the strategies I teach. That's relevant because whether it's 'Lessons From Prison' that I continue to point to because you should go to WhiteCollarAdvice.com and get it for free. My marketing team has told me I need more calls to action and I tell them, "YouTube is to teach not sell." They said, "Let us stick with the marketing and you stick with the ethics and prison consulting." This is for the marketing team. Go grab my book, it will help you. Whether it's my book or any of the books that I discuss today, if you do not implement what you learn, it's useless, it's garbage. It means absolutely nothing. It's the reason that some people will read a book and get incredible benefit from it, someone else will read it and say, "Wow. This is terrible." It's simply the implementation. With implementation comes the key. Of course, my recommended book list may differ from yours because our values might be different. I spent my time in prison wanting to build a business, connect with my family, better understand philosophy and ethics, leadership, better understand how I made bad decisions that separated me from my family. I suppose there's some value in that but I look at some of those books as, essentially it's a movie. It's just a paperback movie in your hand. Today is Sunday. It is a big football day in prison and all across our country. If you want to watch football, that's terrific, but after, you've got to get back to work and you've got to get back to preparing yourself for the inevitable obstacles. Let's transition to books that I think will help you.
Views: 4555 White Collar Advice
My Last Day In Federal Prison (Now What?)
 
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As a former stockbroker who made bad decisions that led me to prison, I know the complications that come with a white collar crime conviction. In fact, in many ways the federal prison term can turn out to be the easiest part of the process. Fighting our case can take months and even years. Because of the time and toll it takes it can be difficult to imagine life on the other side of federal prison. But imagine and plan we must! In this video, I share some of what I was thinking on my final day at Taft Federal Prison Camp. I hope this video helps you reach your final day in federal prison stronger and better than you ever envisioned. Someday this will be behind you. Begin preparing for that day now. Thank you, Justin Justin Paperny, Author of Lessons From Prison & Ethics in Motion Text LIBERTY to 44222 for a free copy of Lessons From Prison [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2117 White Collar Advice
Why Some Lawyers Don't Like Prison Consultants
 
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www.federalprisonadvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From Prison www.whitecollaradvice.com to read our blog Questions: Call Justin Paperny at 818-424-2220 Justin Paperny explains why some lawyers do not want to work with federal prison consultants. The 4 most popular reasons include: the prison consultants plays lawyer, they engage in scare tactics, they offer guarantees, and act unethically. Like anything else, due diligence is key. Check testimonials (real names), case studies, go through a scope of work, speak with their other clients to confirm the consultant's claims, and more. Due your homework, and after you have considered all the pros of cons, trust your judgment. Hi everyone. It is Justin Paperny. The 14th of June, about 8:30 in the evening. It’s been a long day, and I want to knock out this video talking about why some lawyers don’t like prison consultants. This video comes from something that happened earlier today. Before I get into it, a few bookkeeping items. I get a hundred emails, or questions a month about various aspects of prison life, for personally for me, so I’ve never really done this. I thought I’d answer I few questions, stuff like... “Justin, do you still get up at 5 am?” -No, I actually get up earlier. I got up at 5 am in prison. I get up at about 4:30 in the morning. Now I start my days early, still overcoming my own felony conviction I work very hard to rebuild. I have a family now. In fact, let’s pause for a second and look at- there it is. That’s why I worked hard for 20 hours a day in prison, despite not having her in my life yet. That’s the reason I work so hard now. That’s a photo of my daughter Alyssa. So, I get going very early. Another question, do I watch TV, because I write a lot that I didn’t watch TV in prison. I watch a little TV now with my wife, the Bachelorette, presuming she likes me provide a colour commentary. I do like to watch a little golf and Millionaire. Listing New York is my favourite show. “Justin, do you regret doing a TV show on your story?” -No, I told the truth. I figure NBC could spin it if they wanted to; they didn’t. I was pretty pleased how it came out. 4. “What bothered you most about prison?” - The whistling; even whistling now I get like a shake in my neck. The whistling really troubled me. 5. “What books are you currently reading?” - For the fifth time I’m reading Machiavelli’s “The prince”. So, let’s transition now into the reasons that I’m doing this video. Why some lawyers don’t like prison consultants? And for clarity I say some, not all. I’m not indicting all lawyers. I don’t want to do sweeping generalizations. Some lawyers, because I worked with some terrific lawyers that I proudly send my clients to; that I wish or I happily would’ve had represent me. Guys like Alan Eisner, Dimitry Gordon, David Rosenfeld, Nicholas Kaiser- terrific lawyers that care about their clients. They have the empathy, the sympathy. They have all the attributes that you would want in a lawyer. So, I want to be really clear. I’m not saying all lawyers; I’m just saying some. And, this video comes as a result of a call that I got earlier today from a new client. For some background, on Saturday a prospect scheduled a call. We spoke for an hour. Following our call, I spend about 90 minutes creating a scope of work. I reviewed the scope of work with him and his wife through Skype. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 1692 White Collar Advice
How To Avoid The Stockholm Syndrome in Federal Prison
 
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This video explains why some white-collar offenders suffer from the Stockholm Syndrone in prison, and the consequences that could follow. Visit www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for more info. and a free copy of Justin's book, Lessons From Prison. Justin Paperny: Hi. It’s February 25th, and I’m going to talk about, well I guess what I talk about in every video- some aspect of federal prison. Before I jump into today's lesson can a quickly share into those who have interest an initial template of my new site for FederalPrisonAdvice.com, which will be live next month that I'm very proud of. And, here you get an idea of the courses that will be offering to those who subscribe, or become members and part of this experience we’re creating, including some of these benefits of coaching, and videos, and weekly office hours, and resources and everything in between. So, the site is coming together; should be up next month and I’m very proud of it. So, you’re just going to have to look at a photo of me as I transition into this video. As many of you know I have a very close relationship with my partner and mentor Michael Santos, who served 26 consecutive years in prison. I met Michael at TAFT federal prison camp and much of what I learned, I learned from him. One day, while walking the track, I asked Michael to describe to me the Stockholm syndrome. He’d written a blog about it and I was curious to get his interpretation. He responded by saying didn’t you graduate USC with a psychology degree, and you didn’t know the Stockholm syndrome? So, rather than let him know that I did, I said, well I don’t know much. Can you educate me? And, later that afternoon, in the TAFT library he showed me the similar definition, except that was no line of course; it was in the dictionary. And the definition of the Stockholm syndrome reads- it's a psychological phenomenon in which hostages express empathy and sympathy, and have positive feelings toward their captor, sometimes to the point of defending and identifying with the captors. And, we discussed this- well, I learned about it from a blog he wrote, and from there I was asking, you know, his thoughts on it and he said you have to adjust in a way that’s best for you and your family and your prison term. It really encouraged me to understand my environment; to study those who are succeeding in prison versus those who might be having trouble. So, based on that advice I began watching, and making a study of my fellow prisoners. And, through this study I remember a prisoner every Monday morning would speak for 20, 30, 40 minutes to a guard and it always followed football on Sunday. So, they would talk about the playoffs, and the Super Bowl, and Tom Brady, and who is going to win, and the Raiders. It was just endless conversation about football. And, I watched them have this conversation, and I’d look at other prisoners walk by and give him a look almost in disbelief they’re having such a lengthy conversation. visit me: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 2282 White Collar Advice
White Collar 101: Life in Federal Prison
 
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Life in Federal Prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjmkBwldUNA { Life in Federal Prison} Justin Paperny shares details on what life is like inside federal prison. If you are a defendant or family member supporting a loved one in trouble, watch this video to ensure the time in prison is productive and free from altercation or unnecessary drama. {Life in federal prison} What We Do: White Collar Advice provides a menu of products and services that teach others how they can prepare to make the most of their journey. We cannot change the past for anyone. Yet we absolutely can teach strategies that lead to the conquering of adversity and the restoration of dignity. At White Collar Advice, we provide guidance to empower others who want to tap their strengths, to reclaim their life, to emerge from difficult experiences stronger than anyone would expect. By teaching others about every aspect of the prison system, we show them how they can prepare to minimize the downside and maximize the upside. {Life in federal prison} Who We Are & What Differentiates Us: Our service differs from the typical prison consultant. Many so-called prison consultants masquerade as experts, citing time they served as their credential. They sell fear, preying upon people who are more vulnerable than ever. Other prison consultants built careers working as functionaries of the prison system—former prison guards who contributed to the intergenerational failure factories. After leaving the barbed-wire bureaucracies, those former prison guards brand themselves as “prison consultants” and attempt to provide guidance on what individuals should expect while serving time. {Life in federal prison} Such individuals have not mastered the challenges associated with confinement. Yet they sell services suggesting that they can advise others. We recognize that many prison consultants are distasteful, bordering on sleazy in their approach to dispensing guidance. Why Are We Different? Rather than offering the boilerplate information that anyone can find online, our programs guide people to success. If a client doesn’t appreciate the coaching and programs we offer, then the client pays nothing. #firstdayinfederalprison {Life in federal prison} Clients and their family members routinely tell us that lessons they learned from White Collar Advice were the greatest value they received through their unfortunate experience. Our products and services do more than prepare individuals for the journey ahead. They also restore the confidence and dignity that the criminal justice system seems designed to extinguish. {Life in federal prison} Defense attorneys, criminal defendants, and those who want to learn about mastering the prison system will find White Collar Advice an outstanding resource. In addition to teaching how to prepare for prison, White Collar Advice’s programs teach individuals how to reposition themselves for a successful life. {Life in federal prison} https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjmkBwldUNA www.FederalPrisonAdvice.com for a free copy of Lessons From Prison. [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs Visit: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California #firstdayinfederalprison [Life in federal prison]
Views: 25317 White Collar Advice
Hours Away From Surrendering To Federal Prison
 
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Hours Before Surrendering To Federal Prison...What Will You Be Thinking About? Justin Paperny interviews Shad Huston hours before his surrender to Yankton Federal Prison Camp. Visit www.federalprisonadvice.com now for a free copy of Lessons from Prison. Questions? Call or text Justin at 818-424-2220. Justin Paperny: Hi. This is Justin Paperny with White Collar Advice. So, I’m pleased to welcome my friend Chad Houston. Chad is going to be surrendering to Yankton federal prison camp tomorrow to begin a 41 month sentence. And, surrendering to prison is tough. It comes with a number of complexities and Chad I’m serious nervous to be going in, but he's prepared. He's put in the time and I so admire him for talking about what these last few hours are like before going to federal prison. So Chad, welcome. Give us a little bit of your background, your history and how you're feeling knowing that you'll be crossing over into prison boundaries in the coming hours? Chad Houston: Well, unfortunately I never planned on knowing this much about the federal prison system and the legal justice system, but I got myself in this problem. I pled guilty to three different felonies. One was structuring payments, one was bribery, and one was false invoicing. I was actually set to be sentenced to March of 18th of 2015, and we got there for the sentence hearing and at that point the judge basically said I’m throwing everything out; we’re starting all over again. And at that point I was pretty well capped out. I mean, it was very expensive to get to that point and all I could afford- I couldn’t afford anything. So, my attorney was going to stay on with me and see me through it. The prosecution took couple of shots at my attorney to get him removed for a conflict of interest. He got removed as my attorney. They were successful after a couple of times, and at that point I had to go to the public defender and basically start all over. That happened in May, and from May up until January, right at the end of January is when I pled out. Justin Paperny: So, the timeline matters and because these white collar crime cases you know take so long to pled out and the stress of it, many defendants like extensions because it delays the inevitable, or we think that the delays could help us in sentencing and at times they can depending on how proactive the defendant is. But, in time eventually you just say I just want to get this beyond. I want to get sentenced. I want to move on to the next phase, because as I often said this is the hardest part. I mean, you are going to be in prison in the next 18 hours and what you’re enduring the day before will be tougher than that first day, as crazy as it seems. Quickly, were you- I understand you pled guilty, you accepted responsibility, you didn’t blame anybody but yourself, but did you still feel a sense of vengeance or frustration when the US attorney was pushing to have a lawyer that you had paid hundreds of thousands of dollars removed, and you essentially had to start over with a public defender? Visit me at: [email protected] - 818-424-2220 Visit https://www.whitecollaradvice.com to access our federal prison blogs https://www.youtube.com/user/FederalPrisonAdvice https://twitter.com/JustinPaperny https://www.facebook.com/whitecollaradvice/ Phone : - +1 818-424-2220 23679 Calabasas Rd, Suite 905 Calabasas, CA 91302 California
Views: 5030 White Collar Advice

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