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Search results “Archeology science articles” for the 2019
8 Most Incredible Archaeological Discoveries Recently Made
 
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8 most incredible archaeological discoveries recently made. We take a look at these amazing archaeological discoveries that have recently been made. Every year, more and more incredible breakthroughs about the history of the human race are uncovered. These incredible findings are often overlooked by mainstream scientific articles however and it is not until decades later that the researchers responsible get the credit they deserve. In order to bring these incredible discoveries to light, here at unexplained mysteries, we will be going over 8 amazing recent archaeological discoveries. Thank you for watching! Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!
Views: 244577 Unexplained Mysteries
Archaeological science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeological_science 00:01:21 1 Types of archaeological science 00:02:25 1.1 Dating techniques 00:03:49 1.2 Artifact studies 00:05:00 2 Influence of archaeometry 00:05:40 3 Locating Archaeological Sites 00:06:21 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9500733801086069 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Archaeological science, also known as archaeometry, consists of the application of scientific techniques to the analysis of archaeological materials, to assist in dating the materials. It is related to methodologies of archaeology. Martinón-Torres and Killick distinguish ‘scientific archaeology’ (as an epistemology) from ‘archaeological science’ (the application of specific techniques to archaeological materials). Martinón-Torres and Killick claim that ‘archaeological science’ has promoted the development of high-level theory in archaeology. However, Smith rejects both concepts of archaeological science because neither emphasize falsification or a search for causality.In the United Kingdom, the Natural and Environmental Research Council provides funding for archaeometry separate from the funding provided for archaeology. However, in almost all cases of archeometric research, scientists from the natural sciences assist in the scientific analysis of archeological artifacts. Universities that offer courses in archeometry offer these courses frequently as free choice for archeology students and these courses contain mainly a nonscientific overview over the possibilities that different scientific analyses offer to them.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Journal of Archaeological Science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Archaeological_Science 00:00:24 Abstracting and indexing Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8699959427456556 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Journal of Archaeological Science is a peer-reviewed academic journal that covers "the development and application of scientific techniques and methodologies to all areas of archaeology". The journal was established in 1974 by Academic Press and is currently published by Elsevier.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
10 Mysterious Places On Earth Scientists Are Still Trying To Understand
 
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The most mysterious and strange places on Earth are sometimes hard to understand even by scientists. A lot of things about the world aren't well known but there are still some theories going around. The tools needed to solve some of life's biggest mysteries are relatively new, and it's going to take scientists some time to comb through all of the mysteries. When it comes to the inexplicably strange and surreal places out there, they can sometimes leave us feeling like there's no logical answer as to why they exist. Interested? Check out other amazing videos about our world and subscribe to the channel! ► http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Richest ◄ Like: 10 Unbelievable Things Found Deep In The Woods https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nd0OXFLNmSw 10 Companies Who Made 1 Huge Mistake Which Infuriated Everyone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NT3gtCH8QEw Back to these mysterious places. Take the Namibian Fairy Circles as an example. Located in Africa's Namib Desert, these circles vary vastly in diameter, but they also span an area of over 1,000 miles. While locals believe them to be the footprints of gods who once walked across the desert, scientists have been trying to make sense of them for decades. One theory involves sand termites, but experts can't seem to agree on that being the cause. Then there's the confusion surrounding the Naga Fireballs. This name was given to the tiny orbs of fire that seem to lift out of the Mekong River in Thailand every October and May. People are so fascinated by this phenomenon that there's an entire festival dedicated to their ascension. If you want to learn more about the places that are baffling experts everywhere, check out this video! For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Our Social Media: Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest For more videos and articles visit: http://therichest.com/
Views: 117027 TheRichest
Scientists Have Deciphered an Ancient Scroll That Could Solve the Mystery of the Pyramid of Giza
 
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For years and years, archaeologists have had questions regarding the Great Pyramid of Giza. Because there was no heavy machinery back then, they wonder how the enormous stone blocks that were used to construct the pyramids got to the site in the first place. Its sheer size makes it seem impossible. The Great Pyramid is located in Giza. It is about a 20-minute drive from the center of Cairo, which is the capital of Egypt. The pyramid was built by the pharaoh, Khufu about 4,500 years ago. People have wondered about this structure for years. Experts have always had different opinions, and they argued about how the huge blocks were brought to the area. When the pyramid was complete, it was 480-feet tall. Over the years, the height had diminished somewhat due to centuries of desert erosion. For over 3,800 years, the pyramid was the tallest structure in the world. This all changed in 1300 when the Lincoln Cathedral was completed. The 520-foot spire is what made it the tallest structure. It didn't hold the title for long because, in 1549, the spire was blown down during a storm. When this happened, the Great Pyramid reclaimed its title. Today, French researchers believe that they have the answers to how the Great Pyramid was constructed. Scientists have deciphered an ancient scroll that could solve the mystery of the Pyramid of Giza. They are hoping that this will give them some answers. Based on the sheer size of the blocks, it seems impossible. Based on raw statistics, it took about 2.3 million blocks to build it. The largest blocks weighted up to 80-tons each. The pyramid needed about 6-million tons of limestone and 9-million tons of granite. The granite had to be brought in from Aswan which was 420-miles away. Without motorized vehicles, it makes you wonder how this was possible. The man who may have some answers is Pierre Tallet. He is a French archaeologist who studied at the prestigious Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. His links to Egypt began when he began working as a teacher there. He has studied more than the Great Pyramid. He has also studied other Egyptian sites that are less well known. He has dedicated most of his life to these structures and to discovering more about them. Tallet's first breakthrough came when he found a series of horizontal underground passages near the Red Sea. These passages have been sealed up for a long time. Tallet believes that the chambers were used by the ancient Egyptians as a place to store their boats. He made this discovery at Ayn Soukhna. This is a popular tourist resort on the west bank of the Red Sea. It is about 70-miles east of Giza. It was never considered a site of archaeological significance; however, in 1997, ancient hieroglyphs were found carved in the cliff, and the area was considered to be important. Tallet's find was in the same period that the Pharoah Khufu's Great Pyramid was constructed. According to Tallet, he found a sophisticated harbor complex. He believes that this location was used to transport the materials to the Great Pyramid. The second major find was another harbor site called Wadi al-Jarf on the Red Sea. In 1823, an English archaeologist named Sir John Gardner Wilkinson visited the area. He misinterpreted what he saw there. He assumed that the chambers cut into the rock face at the site were catacombs. Tallet knew that two French pilots were stationed in Egypt in the 1950s and had visited the area. One of them was still alive, and he told Tallet what he knew. These notes, combined with GPS brought him to the site. Tallet and his team gained entrance by removing some of the massive stones. Inside, they found a scroll, complete with photos that explained how the rocks got to the site. He also found a diary written by an official named Mercer. He was the leader of a team of 200 men whose job it was to transport goods around Egypt. It was dated 4,500-years ago which was when the Great Pyramid was built. The diary also mentions a journey to Tura, which is a town on the River Nile where limestone for the construction of the Great Pyramid was quarried. Today, the diary is housed at Boston's Museum Of Fine Arts for everyone to see. This isn't solid evidence, but it is the most information we have been able to find thus far. Finally, we are getting answers to this centuries-old mystery. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to Facts Verse: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/factsverse/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/factsverse/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/factsverse6030/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.factsverse.com
Views: 43900 Facts Verse
10 Mysterious Underground Discoveries Made by Scientists
 
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Scientists are constantly discovering new innovations, new cures for diseases and always progressing on research that’s vital to progressing human life. Sometimes though, they find secrets that are so astonishing, that makes us question everything we know so far about humanity, the universe, and life itself. Today, we’ll count down some of the top mysterious underground discoveries made by scientists. 10. Costa Rica Stone Spheres 9. The World’s Oldest Clock 8. The Tomb of Cleopatra 7. The Qin Shi Huang Army 6. The Lost City of Atlantis 5. Underground Ecosystem 4. The Turin Shroud 3.??? 2. ?? 1. ? ► SUBSCRIBE TO AMERIKANO!: https://goo.gl/e8mcCy ► VISIT OUR SITE FOR THE BEST ARTICLES!: www.thefinestpost.com ► For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] ► WORK FOR TOP 5S FINEST: https://goo.gl/Su8DZQ ► FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest ► LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/TheFinestPost/ Background Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe!
Views: 25902 The Finest
Scientists Find The STRANGEST Discovery Up To Date
 
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► VISIT OUR SITE FOR THE BEST ARTICLES!: www.thefinestpost.com ► For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] ► WORK FOR TOP 5S FINEST: https://goo.gl/Su8DZQ ► FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest ► LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/TheFinestPost/ Background Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe!
Views: 27641 The Finest
Student Accidentally Created Rechargeable Battery That Lasts for 400 Years
 
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Accidents happen every day. People get in car accidents all the time. You may accidentally drop your cellphone, resulting in a cracked screen. You could accidentally forget to put sugar in your coffee. You don't intend for the accidents to happen, but they do. There are times where an accident can result in something incredible. The microwave was invented when a man was experimenting with a new vacuum tube. The idea for the ink-jet printer came about when a Canon engineer left his hot iron on a pen by mistake, and the ink exploded. When a scientist working with coal tar forgot to wash his hands after dinner, he discovered artificial sweeteners. The potato chip was invented when an angry chef wanted to get revenge on a customer who complained that his potatoes were too thick and soggy. These things were invented by accident, and they changed our world. Mya Le Thai is a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine. She wanted to do something to change the world someday. She just never thought that she would do it so quickly and by mistake. This student accidentally created a rechargable battery that lasts for 400 years. Talk about an incredible discovery. The magic of rechargeable batteries is that you don't need to throw them away when the battery dies. You simply plug the battery into a power source and your battery charges. The most common items that have rechargeable batteries are cell phones, laptop computers, and tablets. You can also buy AA and AAA batteries that sit in a charger when they start to die. The only problem with this is that over time, the battery loses its ability to charge. This means that you would need to buy a new battery. On average, a laptop battery can be charged between 300 and 500 times. Mya and the other researchers in her lab were experimenting with nanowires that are used in batteries. During their research, they discovered that these thin, fragile wires would break down and crack after multiple charging cycles. This is what makes it difficult to recharge the battery. During this research, Mya had an idea. Mya thought that if she coated a set of nanowires in manganese dioxide and a Plexiglas-like electrolyte gel. She didn't think much of it at the time. She didn't even think that it would work. According to the chair of the university's chemistry department, she started to cycle these gel capacitors, and that's when they discovered something shocking. She discovered that the thing had been cycling 10,000 cycles and it was still going. A few days later, she returned to the lab. She found that it had still been cycling and it had gone through over 30,000 cycles. This continued for a month. Over time, the battery cycled over 200,000 times. The average laptop battery lasts for about 300 to 500 charging cycles. When the battery can no longer cycle, it will no longer charge. This means you would need to buy a new battery. Mya discovered that she could create a battery that can survive 200,000 charging cycles in the months while losing only 5 percent of its capacity. This means that it is possible to extend the average laptop battery for up to 400 years. Thanks to her idea, we may never need to replace our laptop batteries again. This can also work for cell phone batteries, tablet batteries, and any other type of rechargeable battery. The gold nanowire, the manganese dioxide, and the electrolyte gel would drive up the cost of the battery. Researchers are looking for an alternative. They believe that a nickel substitute would be great for mass production and keeping costs down. Not only would batteries that last 400 years be good for the consumer, but they would also be great for the environment. Landfills all around the world are full of rechargeable batteries that no longer work. If electronics started to be made with long-lasting batteries that last centuries, the number of laptop and cellphone batteries in landfills would decline quickly. Mya created these batteries by mistake. She wasn't looking to invent the longest lasting battery known to man, but she still did it. She never imagined one simple idea to turn into something so incredible. Thanks to Mya, one day, we might be able to live in a world where replacing your laptop or cell phone battery will be a thing of the past. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to Facts Verse: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/factsverse/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/factsverse/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/factsverse6030/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.factsverse.com
Views: 318090 Facts Verse
Scientific diving | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_diving 00:02:46 1 Scope of work 00:03:25 1.1 Contribution of scientific diving to research 00:08:33 1.2 Modes of diving 00:09:23 1.3 Branches of science frequently using diving 00:10:46 1.4 Other fields which may use scientific diving 00:11:09 1.5 Citizen science 00:12:00 2 Management and control of scientific diving operations 00:13:57 3 Standard and emergency diving procedures 00:16:42 4 Working procedures common to scientific diving 00:17:54 4.1 Underwater navigation 00:22:03 4.2 Searches 00:24:50 4.3 Collection, sampling, tagging and recording 00:26:30 4.4 Surveys, measurement and mapping 00:28:03 5 Risk and safety 00:29:13 5.1 Safety record 00:31:49 6 Demographics 00:32:52 7 Regulation of scientific diving 00:33:15 7.1 Exemptions 00:33:41 7.2 Governance and representation organisations 00:36:28 8 Training and registration of scientific divers 00:38:33 9 International variations and cooperation 00:38:45 9.1 Australia 00:40:21 9.2 Germany 00:41:41 9.3 South Africa 00:45:33 9.4 United Kingdom 00:47:47 9.5 United States 00:53:23 9.6 International scientific cooperation 00:54:01 9.6.1 Europe 00:57:27 9.7 Standards, reference manuals and codes of practice 01:01:02 10 Gallery Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7472751070424671 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Scientific diving is the use of underwater diving techniques by scientists to perform work underwater in the direct pursuit of scientific knowledge. The legal definition of scientific diving varies by jurisdiction. Scientific divers are normally qualified scientists first and divers second, who use diving equipment and techniques as their way to get to the location of their fieldwork. The direct observation and manipulation of marine habitats afforded to scuba-equipped scientists have transformed the marine sciences generally, and marine biology and marine chemistry in particular. Underwater archeology and geology are other examples of sciences pursued underwater. Some scientific diving is carried out by universities in support of undergraduate or postgraduate research programs, and government bodies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the UK Environment Agency carry out scientific diving to recover samples of water, marine organisms and sea, lake or riverbed material to examine for signs of pollution. Equipment used varies widely in this field, and is generally selected based on cost, effectiveness, availability and risk factors. Open-circuit scuba is most often used as it is widely available and cost-effective, and is the entry level training mode in most places. Scientific diving in the course of employment may be regulated by occupational safety legislation, or may be exempted as self-regulated by a recognised body. The safety record has generally been good. Collection of scientific data by volunteers outside of employment is generally considered to legally be recreational diving. Training standards vary throughout the world, and are generally higher than for entry level recreational diving, and in some cases identical to commercial diver training. There are a few international agreements that facilitate scientists from different places working together on projects of common interest, by recognising mutually acceptable minimum levels of competence.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
The GREATEST Discoveries Found in Antarctica Up to Date
 
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Antarctica is the coldest known place on the planet and for that reason, it’s probably not a very good destination hot spot for a lot of people. We know so little about the giant ice cap but we’ve learned so much in just the past few decades. In today’s video, we’ll go over some of the top discoveries we’ve made throughout history in Antarctica 10. Fossilized Forests 9. Bacteria Discovery 8. The Hole 7. Super Old Ice 6. Super Old Ice 5. Penguins 4. Temperatures 3.??? 2. ?? 1. ? ► SUBSCRIBE TO AMERIKANO!: https://goo.gl/e8mcCy ► VISIT OUR SITE FOR THE BEST ARTICLES!: www.thefinestpost.com ► For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] ► WORK FOR TOP 5S FINEST: https://goo.gl/Su8DZQ ► FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest ► LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/TheFinestPost/ Background Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe!
Views: 538421 The Finest
What Science Has Taught Us About Stonehenge
 
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Over the years, lots of explanations have been proposed as the origin of Stonehenge, including lost technologies, outright magic, and — of course — aliens. What do we actually know about this prehistoric mystery? Skillshare is offering SciShow viewers two months of unlimited access to Skillshare for free! Try it here: https://skl.sh/scishow-13 Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever: Greg, Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: History and Construction: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history-and-stories/history/ https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history-and-stories/building-stonehenge/ http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20587/1/Antiquity%202012%20(Stonehenge%20Remodelled).pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311767763_Stonehenge_Amesbury_Wiltshire_-_Chronological_Modelling https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/05/23/stonehenge-wasnt-so-hard-to-build-after-all-archaeologists-disco/ https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/retracing-the-footsteps-of-hh-thomas-a-review-of-his-stonehenge-bluestone-provenancing-study/CAD5AD26468F0FF5433BA78B9FECF1FC https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/D1E66A287D494205D22881CBF1F6DDE8/S0003598X15001775a.pdf/craig-rhos-y-felin-a-welsh-bluestone-megalith-quarry-for-stonehenge.pdf https://www.livescience.com/62619-did-glaciers-carry-stonehenge-bluestones.html https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences-and-law/anthropology-and-archaeology/archaeology-general/stonehenge#1 https://d.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/text/geoffrey-of-monmouth-arthurian-passages-from-the-history-of-the-kings-of-britain https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0016787815000899 Dead and Burials: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-28969-8 http://dro.dur.ac.uk/5849/1/5849.pdf http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1474049/1/Dead%20of%20Stonehenge%20Antiquity%20final%20version.pdf https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-11421593 https://www.wessexarch.co.uk/our-work/explore-stonehenge-landscape Image Sources: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stonehenge_Cremation.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stonehenge_phase_one.jpg
Views: 542925 SciShow
Top 10 Scary ANTARCTICA Urban Legends
 
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Top 10 Scary ANTARCTICA Urban Legends Subscribe To Most Amazing Top 10: http://bit.ly/2Ibyk6i Become A Most Amazing Top 10 Member: https://bit.ly/2OgwCmN Top 10 Scary Things Found Frozen In Antarctica https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDfQjKbwa7Y Hello and welcome back to the Most Amazing Channel on the Internet – I am your host Rebecca Felgate and today we are venturing to the arctic tundra as we discuss The Top 10 Antarctic Urban Legends. To be honest, we can talk about Antarctica like it is a far off distant place but to be honest with you it LOOKS like Antarctica outside my window in Toronto RIGHT NOW. Ergh! The land of Antarctica was mostly ice 34 million years ago and has been totally lost under the ice for 15 million years. What is hiding under the ice has been the cause for many topics of debate and the mystery behind many urban legends. #top10 #antarctica #urbanlegends Channel Producer: Landon Dowlatsingh- https://www.instagram.com/landonproductions/ Most Amazing Top 10 Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/mostamazingofficial/ Most Amazing Top 10 Merch: https://shop.bbtv.com/collections/most-amazing Hosted By: Rebecca Felgate: https://www.instagram.com/missrebeccaj/ Video Edited By: Ryan Wazonek For Business Inquiries Contact: [email protected] Sources: https://www.hurtigruten.com/destinations/antarctica/inspiration/antarctica-fact-vs-fiction/ http://www.vb-tech.co.za/Antartica/myths1.htm https://museum.wales/articles/2008-05-19/When-Antarctica-went-into-the-deep-freeze/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bez4DKZI7yU&feature=youtu.be https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blood_Falls_by_Peter_Rejcek.jpg https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/04/blood-falls-antarctica-explained/ https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/archaeology/shock-claims-massive-ancient-civilisation-lies-frozen-deep-beneath-the-antarctic-ice-and-could-even-be-atlantis/news-story/433fc633f7ae122ef8a525013ecba97b http://www.vb-tech.co.za/Antartica/myths1.htm https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1016610/weird-news-youtube-alien-bunker-Antarctica-secret-military-base https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/927435/UFO-alien-youtube-aliens-proof-google-earth-secureteam https://www.warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/top-four-myths-legends-nazis-m.html https://www.hurtigruten.com/destinations/antarctica/inspiration/antarctica-fact-vs-fiction/ http://www.vb-tech.co.za/Antartica/myths1.htm
Views: 219758 MostAmazingTop10
Geophysical survey (archaeology) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophysical_survey_(archaeology) 00:00:25 1 Overview 00:02:08 2 Methods 00:12:25 3 Development 00:13:48 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9903365155020774 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In archaeology, geophysical survey is ground-based physical sensing techniques used for archaeological imaging or mapping. Remote sensing and marine surveys are also used in archaeology, but are generally considered separate disciplines. Other terms, such as "geophysical prospection" and "archaeological geophysics" are generally synonymous.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
15 Most AMAZING Recent DISCOVERIES
 
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Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to Facts Verse: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/factsverse/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/factsverse/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/factsverse6030/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.factsverse.com
Views: 32009 Facts Verse
History of Chinese science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China 00:01:21 1 Mo Di and the School of Names 00:04:36 2 Han Dynasty 00:06:38 3 "Four Great Inventions" 00:09:32 4 China's scientific revolution 00:11:19 4.1 Song Dynasty 00:14:08 4.1.1 Archaeology 00:15:45 4.1.2 Geology and climatology 00:16:44 4.2 Mongol transmission 00:18:25 4.3 Theory and hypothesis 00:21:36 4.4 Pharmacology 00:22:57 4.5 Horology and clockworks 00:24:51 4.6 Magnetism and metallurgy 00:26:34 4.7 Mathematics 00:27:28 4.8 Alchemy and Taoism 00:28:54 4.9 Gunpowder warfare 00:29:56 5 Jesuit activity in China 00:32:39 6 Scientific and technological stagnation 00:37:11 7 The Republic of China (1912–49) 00:38:11 8 People's Republic of China 00:40:30 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8946433687621982 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ancient Chinese scientists and engineers made significant scientific innovations, findings and technological advances across various scientific disciplines including the natural sciences, engineering, medicine, military technology, mathematics, geology and astronomy. Among the earliest inventions were the abacus, the "shadow clock," and the first items such as Kongming lanterns. The Four Great Inventions,the compass, gunpowder, papermaking, and printing – were among the most important technological advances, only known to Europe by the end of the Middle Ages 1000 years later. The Tang Dynasty (AD 618–906) in particular was a time of great innovation. A good deal of exchange occurred between Western and Chinese discoveries up to the Qing Dynasty. The Jesuit China missions of the 16th and 17th centuries introduced Western science and astronomy, then undergoing its own revolution, to China, and knowledge of Chinese technology was brought to Europe. In the 19th and 20th centuries the introduction of Western technology was a major factor in the modernization of China. Much of the early Western work in the history of science in China was done by Joseph Needham.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
Computational archaeology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_archaeology 00:02:08 1 Origins and objectives 00:07:49 2 Training and research 00:12:07 3 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7411007848204989 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Computational archaeology describes computer-based analytical methods for the study of long-term human behaviour and behavioural evolution. As with other sub-disciplines that have prefixed 'computational' to their name (e.g. computational biology, computational physics and computational sociology), the term is reserved for (generally mathematical) methods that could not realistically be performed without the aid of a computer. Computational archaeology may include the use of geographical information systems (GIS), especially when applied to spatial analyses such as viewshed analysis and least-cost path analysis as these approaches are sufficiently computationally complex that they are extremely difficult if not impossible to implement without the processing power of a computer. Likewise, some forms of statistical and mathematical modelling, and the computer simulation of human behaviour and behavioural evolution using software tools such as Swarm or Repast would also be impossible to calculate without computational aid. The application of a variety of other forms of complex and bespoke software to solve archaeological problems, such as human perception and movement within built environments using software such as University College London's Space Syntax program, also falls under the term 'computational archaeology'. Computational archaeology is also known as archaeological informatics (Burenhult 2002, Huggett and Ross 2004) or archaeoinformatics (sometimes abbreviated as "AI", but not to be confused with artificial intelligence).
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Environmental archaeology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_archaeology 00:02:58 1 Subfields 00:03:07 1.1 Archaeobotany 00:04:21 1.2 Zooarchaeology 00:04:59 1.3 Geoarchaeology 00:05:44 2 History 00:07:24 2.1 Notable Names in the Field 00:08:09 3 Methods 00:09:12 4 Significance 00:10:11 5 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.825174261540925 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Environmental archaeology is a sub-field of archaeology and is the science of reconstructing the relationships between past societies and the environments they lived in. The field represents an archaeological-palaeoecological approach to studying the palaeoenvironment through the methods of human palaeoecology. Reconstructing past environments and past peoples' relationships and interactions with the landscapes they inhabited provides archaeologists with insights into the origin and evolution of anthropogenic environments, and prehistoric adaptations and economic practices.Environmental archaeology is commonly divided into three sub-fields: archaeobotany (the study of plant remains) zooarchaeology (the study of faunal remains) geoarchaeology (the study of geological processes and their relationship to the archaeological record)Other related fields include: landscape archaeology bioarchaeology and human ecology climatology palaeoecology archival researchEnvironmental archaeology often involves studying plant and animal remains in order to investigate which plant and animal species were present at the time of prehistoric habitations, and how past societies managed them. It may also involve studying the physical environment and how similar or different it was in the past compared to the present day. An important component of such analyses represents the study of site formation processes. This field is particularly useful when artifacts may be absent from an excavated or surveyed site, or in cases of earth movement, such as erosion, which may have buried artifacts and archaeological features. While specialist sub-fields, for example bioarchaeology or geomorphology, are defined by the materials they study, the term "environmental" is used as a general template in order to denote a general field of scientific inquiry that is applicable across time periods and geographical regions studied by archaeology as a whole.Environmental archaeology has emerged as a distinct discipline in the course of the last 50 years. In recent years it has grown rapidly in significance and is now an established component of most excavation projects. The field is multidisciplinary, and environmental archaeologists as well as palaeoecologists work side by side with archaeologists and anthropologists specialising in material culture studies in order to achieve a more holistic understanding of past human lifeways and people-environment interactions. A notable pioneer of environmental archaeology has been Karl Butzer.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
New human species found in the Philippines
 
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Scientists have found a few bones and seven teeth belonging to a previously unknown species of human. They've named the new species Homo luzonensis, after the island of Luzon in the Philippines where it was found. The bones are tiny, suggesting that Homo luzonensis was under 4 feet tall. That would make it the second species of diminutive human to be found in south-east Asia; in 2007 scientists announced the discovery of Homo floresiensis, found on the island of Flores in Indonesia and nicknamed the hobbit. Both species lived around 50,000 years ago, at a time when Asia was also home to our species, the Neanderthals and a group called the Denisovans. The new species raises many questions, including who were its ancestors and how did it move? Read the research paper here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1067-9 Thanks to Rob Rownd (UPFI and UP-ASP) for the excavation footage. The 3D animations were provided by the Callao Cave Archaeology Project.
Views: 364519 nature video
Archaeology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeology 00:03:29 1 History 00:03:39 1.1 Antiquarians 00:05:38 1.2 First excavations 00:07:24 1.3 Development of archaeological method 00:13:10 2 Purpose 00:19:20 2.1 Theory 00:22:33 3 Methods 00:23:48 3.1 Remote sensing 00:26:05 3.2 Field survey 00:32:49 3.3 Excavation 00:36:57 3.4 Analysis 00:38:43 3.5 Computational and virtual archaeology 00:39:47 3.6 Drones 00:41:39 4 Academic sub-disciplines 00:42:37 4.1 Historical archaeology 00:43:18 4.2 Ethnoarchaeology 00:44:11 4.3 Experimental archaeology 00:45:05 4.4 Archaeometry 00:46:25 4.5 Cultural resources management 00:52:47 5 Popular views of archaeology 00:56:03 6 Current issues and controversy 00:56:14 6.1 Public archaeology 01:02:13 6.2 Pseudoarchaeology 01:03:56 6.3 Looting 01:06:17 6.4 Descendant peoples 01:10:02 6.4.1 Repatriation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7098884564910728 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities. In North America archaeology is a sub-field of anthropology, while in Europe it is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi in East Africa 3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology is distinct from palaeontology, the study of fossil remains. It is particularly important for learning about prehistoric societies, for whom there may be no written records to study. Prehistory includes over 99% of the human past, from the Paleolithic until the advent of literacy in societies across the world. Archaeology has various goals, which range from understanding culture history to reconstructing past lifeways to documenting and explaining changes in human societies through time.The discipline involves surveying, excavation and eventually analysis of data collected to learn more about the past. In broad scope, archaeology relies on cross-disciplinary research. It draws upon anthropology, history, art history, classics, ethnology, geography, geology, literary history, linguistics, semiology, textual criticism, physics, information sciences, chemistry, statistics, paleoecology, paleography, paleontology, paleozoology, and paleobotany. Archaeology developed out of antiquarianism in Europe during the 19th century, and has since become a discipline practiced across the world. Archaeology has been used by nation-states to create particular visions of the past. Since its early development, various specific sub-disciplines of archaeology have developed, including maritime archaeology, feminist archaeology and archaeoastronomy, and numerous different scientific techniques have been developed to aid archaeological investigation. Nonetheless, today, archaeologists face many problems, such as dealing with pseudoarchaeology, the looting of artifacts, a lack of public interest, and opposition to the excavation of human remains.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
New Paleontology Discoveries March 2019
 
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So, the news article is a great example of how scientific illiteracy works. The article paints a picture that is largely inaccurate for the sciences, and that's an issue when people are already trying to deny science. Articles like this serve to confirm people's biases about the sciences as exclusionary and elitist, when they should be anything but. Dr. Katherine Crocker on the article https://twitter.com/cricketcrocker/status/1111724951269187587 Editor at Scientific American's thoughts https://twitter.com/katewong/status/1113468513392451584?s=19 Dave Evans, Associate Prof. at U. of Toronto https://twitter.com/DavidEvans_ROM/status/1113436232464384001?s=19 00:09 Paleontology and Journalism 03:15 Early swordfish 03:40 New Mastodon 04:24 Dinosaurs were doing well before the impact 05:47 Massive Cambrian Beds 07:02 T. rex feeding behaviors 08:46 Scotty the T. rex
Views: 476 Raptor Chatter
The Most Famous Burial Site in Israel: The Kidron Valley
 
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Articles: https://www.i24news.tv/en Live: https://video.i24news.tv/page/live?clip=5a94117623eec6000c557fec Replay: https://video.i24news.tv/page/5a97befe23eec6000c5585a9?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=holy_land_uncovered&utm_content=en2  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/i24newsEN/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/i24NEWS_EN Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/i24news/ HOLY LAND UNCOVERED | The Kidron Valley begins on the outskirts of Jerusalem's old city on the Mount of Olives and sloped down to the Judean desert. It is mentioned not only in the Hebrew bible, but in the new testament. Our Uri Shapira has the story.  Many sites in the holy land have a luxurious mausoleum which are dedicated to a Muslim, Christian or Roman figure. However, these three impressive monuments are associated with Jewish characters. This is the Kidron Valley  Perhaps the most striking monument here is the Tomb of Absalom: carved out of rock, and this monument is around 19 meters high. Absalom is described as the rebel son of Kind David, who forced David to flee and almost took over the United Israeli Kingdo. In the book of Samuel Absalom orders the construction of a huge monument to himself. In 2003, Anthropologist Joe Zias from the Hebrew University deciphered an inscription on Absalom’s tomb which emphasis the theory that it is where Zechariah, father of John the Baptist, is buried, and perhaps other figures from the New Testament as well.  Joe Zias, anthropologist from science and archaeology at Hebrew University says,"This finding is very important to Christianity and I think to the history of Jerusalem as well. Because first of all we know the existence, for literary sources at least of these tombs and of these individuals, but we never knew exactly where they were buried and now we have evidence going back to the 4th century that perhaps this was the tomb of Zachariah, Shimon, and we hope that perhaps James as well." The third monument is "Zecheriah’s Tomb" and as opposed to the other monuments, it is completely carved out of solid rock. The tomb is dated to the late Hellenistic period. But tradition ties this site to one of the tragic stories of the bible, a story mentioned in the book of Chronicles. Right below the Mouth of Olives, The Kidron Valley was a substantial burial sites for Jews and Christians. It is also mentioned in the New Testament as one of the areas Jesus passed on his way to Bethany. One way or another, it is one of the most interesting and remarkable burial sites in the Holy Land
Views: 1328 i24NEWS English
Society for Amateur Scientists | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Amateur_Scientists 00:00:40 History Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7946412314255981 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Society for Amateur Scientists (SAS) was a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to "helping ordinary people do extraordinary science". It was the first organization ever created for the generalists of citizen science. Rather than supporting a narrow interest, such as amateur astronomy or archeology, SAS supported amateur research into all fields of science and in so doing, it helped to launch the modern citizen science movement.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
How scientists solved this dinosaur puzzle
 
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We’ve never found a fully intact T. Rex, but we know how to build one. This video is presented by Wix: https://www.wix.com/go/vox Join the Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab When paleontologists uncover a dinosaur they usually only find part of the animal, but when we walk through a museum we see exhibits that paint a full picture – so how do they fill in all those blank spaces? In the early 1900’s artists used to hand carve the pieces, but we’ve come a long way in the past century  – both technologically and scientifically. Now, we’re living in what some call a “golden age” for paleontology. Researchers are uncovering nearly one new species of dinosaur a week – making building exhibits easier and more efficient. Norell’s newest exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History called T.Rex: The ultimate predator is open through August 9th 2020: https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/t-rex-the-ultimate-predator If you want to learn more about the Brontosaurus mishap and revival you can read the study here: https://peerj.com/articles/857/ Throughout the research, I also found this really awesome interactive graphic that show where and when various fossils were found: https://paleobiodb.org/navigator/ Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How to build a dinosaur Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 862181 Vox
#178 Stephen Shennan: Darwinian Archaeology, Culture, And The Origins of Agriculture
 
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------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/the-dissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao ------------------Follow me on--------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedissenteryt/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDissenterYT Anchor (podcast): https://anchor.fm/thedissenter Dr. Stephen Shennan is Professor of Theoretical Archaeology in the Institute of Archaeology at University College London. Dr. Shennan focuses on cultural evolution and Darwinian archaeology, applying theories from evolutionary ecology and cladistics to archaeology. In July 2006, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. He’s the author of several books, including Genes, Memes and Human History: Darwinian Archaeology and Cultural Evolution, Mapping Our Ancestors: Phylogenetic Approaches in Anthropology and Prehistory, and The First Farmers of Europe: An Evolutionary Perspective. In this episode, we talk about Darwinian Archaeology. We start off by addressing the differences in terms of theoretical foundations and methodology between traditional Archaeology and Darwinian Archaeology. Then, we talk about we talk about some basilar aspects of the study of cultures, like the importance of innovation, how to delimitate cultures from one another, and “folk science”. In the second part of the interview, we discuss the origins and spread of agriculture, as informed by archaeological findings. We talk about how agriculture spread through Europe, and aspects related to demography, diet, famine and disease. At the end, Dr. Shennan also explains what the Neolithic was about. Time Links: 00:58 What is Darwinian Archaeology, and how it differs from traditional Archaeology? 06:03 The importance of innovation in human culture 08:37 How do we delimitate cultures from one another? 12:42 Sources for archaeological studies 14:49 Folk science 17:15 Does the methodology vary according to the society and historical period under study? 19:45 Archaeology and human psychology 22:26 The origins and spread of agriculture 31:36 Agriculture in Europe 38:04 Group selection in the spread of agriculture 41:05 Agriculture, demography and innovation 43:46 Agriculture, diet, famine and disease 48:00 What is the Neolithic, and what is it characterized for? 51:56 Follow Dr. Shennan’s work! -- Follow Dr. Shennan’s work: Faculty page: https://bit.ly/2JJ7nvM Articles on Researchgate: https://bit.ly/2Xw556c Academia.edu profile: https://bit.ly/2FGbEwd Amazon page: https://amzn.to/2Ot9hiV Referrenced books/articles: Genes, Memes and Human History: https://amzn.to/2uwm7UE Mapping Our Ancestors: https://amzn.to/2TXYrYl The First Farmers of Europe: https://amzn.to/2TYGYPy -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, SCIMED, PER HELGE HAAKSTD LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, RUI BELEZA, MIGUEL ESTRADA, ANTÓNIO CUNHA, CHANTEL GELINAS, JIM FRANK, JERRY MULLER, FRANCIS FORD, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BRIAN RIVERA, ADRIANO ANDRADE, YEVHEN BODRENKO, SERGIU CODREANU, ADAM BJERRE, JUSTIN WATERS, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK AND AIRES ALMEIDA! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY FIRST PRODUCER, Yzar Wehbe! I also leave you with the link to a recent montage video I did with the interviews I have released until the end of June 2018: https://youtu.be/efdb18WdZUo And check out my playlists on: PSYCHOLOGY: https://tinyurl.com/ybalf8km PHILOSOPHY: https://tinyurl.com/yb6a7d3p ANTHROPOLOGY: https://tinyurl.com/y8b42r7g #TheDissenter #StephenShennan #DarwinianArchaeology #Agriculture
Views: 134 The Dissenter
The Astonishing Story of Galileo Galilei & the Shocking Myth of the War Between Science and Religion
 
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The Galileo myth posits that the great astronomer’s story illustrates the near-inevitable conflict between science and religion — or “faith and fact.” Be sure to check out the new book Unbelievable 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion - https://evolutionnews.org/2019/01/michael-keas-and-unbelievable-scientists-and-the-myths-they-cherish/ As science historian Michael Keas explains, the story is actually more complicated, nuanced, and interesting than the myth would have it. In Unbelievable, Professor Keyes explores seven myths about the history of science and faith. It’s a great read. In the case of Galileo, the scientific evidence available at the time was not at all a slam dunk for the Copernican view. His trial and house arrest by the Catholic Church were not simply a panicked religion fighting back against scientific truth. There were scientists and theologians on Galileo’s side and others against him. Unlike Giordano Bruno, Galileo was not burned. He lived out his life at his comfortable rural estate, Villa Il Gioiello, on the hillside outskirts of Florence. Which, by the way, looks like quite a place. Its name means “The Jewel.” The photo at the top shows the loggia, a room with open walls, overlooking a lovely parklike setting. Of course, as Keas emphasizes, this is still a shameful episode for the Church, but not a simple one! Yet textbooks and the media have portrayed Galileo as a martyr for science, and they continue to do so. His myth goes marching on. As we’ve seen in recent arguments with evolutionists, the mistaken notion remains highly influential: a reasonable adult must either give up religion or isolate it, like a poor sick thing, from science. Not so. Check out the other great videos: Flat Earth Myth: A Favorite with ID Critics https://youtu.be/LtDjsFRyMfs Hollywood Director Randall Wallace & Michael Medved on the Link Between Storytelling and Faith https://youtu.be/KxvCGTf5eDU At the Heart of Theistic Evolution, an Inescapable Contradiction https://youtu.be/AzR2rnQ9WLs And watch all the other Unbelievable videos in this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR8eQzfCOiS3g771gx5RMGQHdGsIwZpwy ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit Discovery Institute https://www.discovery.org/id/ Evolution News & Science Today http://www.evolutionnews.org/ Intelligentdesign.org http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow the CSC on Facebook and Twitter: Twitter: @discoverycsc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute https://www.youtube.com/user/DiscoveryInstitute Dr. Stephen C. Meyer https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephenMeyer The Magician's Twin: CS Lewis & Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/user/cslewisweb Darwin's Heretic - Alfred Russel Wallce: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlfredRWallaceID
Views: 1968 Discovery Science
Amazing Scientific Discoveries Found Trapped in Ice
 
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Over time, scientists have found plenty of things in ice, frozen in time. Some of the things that were found were truly baffling. Here are 42 amazing scientific discoveries found trapped in ice. This lighthouse in Michigan froze due to the frigid temperatures. Seeing the staircase frozen in ice is incredible. If there were anyone in the area that day, they would have perished in such frigid temperatures. Mammoth brains were found in the permafrost of the Laptev Sea coast. They are believed to be over 39,000 years old. Researchers estimate that the brains were of a young mammoth, between six to nine years old. The temperatures were so cold that this fox froze right where he stood. He was found by a hunter in a German lake. It is expected to be displayed as an arctic appendage in a German hotel. Some alligators can survive in frigid and icy waters. This alligator was photographed during its frozen state during temporary hibernation. In 1952, a military plane heading to Anchorage, Alaska crashed into a glacier. The crash killed 41 passengers and 11 crew members. The area was too dangerous for rescue workers to retrieve the wreckage. It took 50 years before they were able to search for the wreckage. When the water freezes, it does so quickly. This fish was eating another fish when the waters froze. He never even got to finish his meal. The nodosaur lived 110 million years ago. This dinosaur grew spikes of armor for protection. It was caught in the ice and was very well preserved when it was discovered. Many birds dive into the water quickly looking for food. These birds didn't know how cold the water was, and they dove into the water too deep and froze instantly. Scientists discovered this ice-age puppy that is believed to be 12,460-years-old. It was found deep in the Siberian tundra. They couldn't believe how well-preserved the animal was. A copperhead arrow was found in the ice. It looked like a modern-day fishing hook. Its discovery gave researchers more insight into the technology used many years ago. Traces of Vikings were found in Juvfonna, Norway. Frozen in ice were sticks, bows, arrows, and pieces of leather shoes. They also found reindeer traps. It is believed that these items are around 3,400-years-old. This mysterious river in Antarctica looks like a frozen, blood-red stream. It is actually iron-rich water. It is the same element that makes Mars red. Glaciers tend to freeze up everything in their paths. This was once a forest, but when it froze over, it became frozen in time. The Incas often offered up human sacrifices at the highest peak of the Andes Mountains. In 1954, the frozen body of a sacrifice named Juanita was found. The Incas also paid homage to the Sun God Inti. A human sacrifice was found that was so intact that scientists were able to determine his blood type, his age, and his status in society. The temperatures are so cold in the Arctic that even bacteria can freeze immediately. When found, they are incredibly well preserved. During World War I, many battles were fought in the Andes. Those who weren't shot and killed froze to death. Their bodies were preserved in blocks of ice. Scientists found the body of a 300-year-old man who was believed to be an ancestor to the First Nations people. They think he lost his life when he fell into a glacier. A woolly mammoth was found frozen in a block of ice in Siberia. It is believed to be 39,000 years old. Scientists say that it is the most finely preserved specimen ever found. Its blood and muscle tissue were still intact. In Yellowstone, scientists didn't find any signs of humans, but they did find a 10,300-year-old spear that was frozen in time. Otzi Man is one of the most famous humans ever to be found in the snow. He is 5,300 years old and was found in the Alps between Austria and Italy. He was so well preserved that scientists could tell that he suffered from gum disease, gallstones, worn joints, hardened arteries, Lyme disease, and parasitic worms. He had a spear in his shoulder, which was what killed him. The frozen body of a 10,000-year-old Woolly rhino was found in the coldest regions of northern Russia. It was exceptionally well-preserved, and it still had fur on its body. These tigers died out 10,000 years ago. It is believed that they died out due to global heating and human hunting. Scientists recovered one off the coast of the UK that weighed 881-pounds. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to Facts Verse: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/factsverse/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/factsverse/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/factsverse6030/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.factsverse.com
Views: 20606 Facts Verse
Airborne Science Program | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborne_Science_Program 00:01:02 1 Media 00:01:10 2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8402181729925852 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= NASA's Airborne Science Program is administered from the NASA Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Edwards, California. The program supports the sub-orbital flight requirements of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. Dryden maintains and operates two ER-2 high-altitude "satellite simulator" aircraft and a DC-8 which is specially configured as a "flying laboratory". The scientific disciplines that employ these aircraft include Earth sciences, astronomy, atmospheric chemistry, climatology, oceanography, archeology, ecology, forestry, geography, geology, hydrology, meteorology, volcanology and biology. The DC-8 and ER-2 are also important tools for the development of sensors intended to fly aboard future Earth-observing satellites, and to validate and calibrate the sensors which are used onboard satellites which currently orbit the Earth.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
The case for re-writing history! New evidence, an introduction to UnchartedX
 
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The high level case for re-writing what we know of the foundations of our history. I also wanted to create a channel introduction video, particularly for people new to the whole 'debate over history' topic, and to explain the premise that is behind many of my other videos! Thanks to Chuck at channel cfapps6875, make sure you visit and subscribe, he does great work: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt2yxX9jhtBEapmep_K468A Please like and subscribe! Leave a comment with your thoughts! UnchartedX: http://UnchartedX.com Support my work: http://unchartedx.com/support Paypal tip jar: http://paypal.me/unchartedx Patreon: http://patreon.com/unchartedx SubscribeStar: http://subscribestar.com/unchartedx Bitcoin: bc1qtg5kaq0s7434fsulm7w94zsqkww57ueel4f4ed Contact me on: Twitter: http://twitter.com/unchartedx1 Instagram: http://instagram.com/unchartedx7 Email: [email protected] References: 2006 New Scientist article: https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9989-timeline-human-evolution/ 300,000 year old human remains found: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/morocco-early-human-fossils-anthropology-science/ Neanderthal/Human DNA split: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/evan.10058 Cerutti Mastadon Site: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/04/mastodons-americas-peopling-migrations-archaeology-science/ Bluefish Caves: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/yukon-first-humans-north-america-1.3936886 Geometric shapes in the Amazon: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100104-amazon-lost-civilization-circles/ Lost cities in the Amazon: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/3077413/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/lost-cities-amazon-revealed/#.XM-RRuhKhaQ DNA Links between Australians and South Americans: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/dna-search-first-americans-links-amazon-indigenous-australians-180955976/ Denisovans: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24232283-700-major-discovery-suggests-denisovans-lived-in-tibet-160000-years-ago/ Homo Floresiensis: https://www.livescience.com/29100-homo-floresiensis-hobbit-facts.html Scans from Charles Hapgood's 'Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings' sourced from my copy of the book. Music: Youtube music library Scott Gratton : A Moment Scott Gratton : The Hours Scott Gratton : The Minutes #history #youngerdryas #cosmichampsterwheel
Views: 78070 UnchartedX
THOR का HAMMER MJOLNIR कैसे उठाया ?? SCIENCE ||HOW CAP.AMERICA LIFTED  MJOLNIR ||SCIENCE ANIMATION
 
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THOR का HAMMER कैसे उठाया ?? ||HOW CAPTAIN AMERICA LIFTED THOR'S HAMMER ||SCIENTIFIC ANIMATION SUBSCRIBE CHANNEL - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCl6Tm2AR4oJ4Bi65qLwkSJg ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- FREE AUDIOBOOK of "RISE OF SUPERMAN" : https://www.seeken.org/jigyaasa/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONNECT TO GET KNOWLEDGE FROM SOME OF THE BEST MENTORS, BOOKS SUBSCRIBE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfhbydY40P2Lli9HuBz8cdA LIKE THE FACEBOOK PAGE https://www.facebook.com/Jigyaasa-Curiosity-146434582597079/ CONNECT ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/seekenjigyasa/ ------------------------------------------------------------------------- IF YOU WATCHED ENDGAME YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN THAT CAPTAIN AMERICA LIFTED THOR'S HAMMER,BUT HOW , BECAUSE IT ISN'T POSSIBLE TO DO ...ODIN FATHER OF THOR AND THE CREATOR OF HAMMER CALLED MJOLNIR .... USED SOME SPELLS ON MJIOLNIR, THOR'S HAMMER TO BECOME HEAVY IF ANY UNWORTHY PERSON TRY TO USE IT...SO THE QUESTION IS WHAT IS WORTHINESS AND UNWORTHINESS .. HOW SOMEONE BECOMES WORTHY TO PICK THOR'S HAMMER MJOLNIR... IN THIS VIDEO WE WILL KNOW ABOUT THIS... SOURCES: https://www.wired.com/2014/11/can-hulk-lift-thors-hammer/ https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/but-not-simpler/getting-the-god-of-thundere28099s-science-straight/?redirect=1 http://www.sciencemadesimple.co.uk/curriculum-blogs/physics-blogs/the-physics-of-thors-hammer https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897075/ https://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/32110/20161117/human-brain-found-fingerprint-unique-neural-connections-proven.htm https://towardsdatascience.com/the-differences-between-artificial-and-biological-neural-networks-a8b46db828b7
Views: 42467 SeeKen Jigyaasa
When We First Made Tools
 
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Try CuriosityStream today: http://curiositystream.com/eons The tools made by our human ancestors may not seem like much when you compare them to the screen you’re looking at right now but their creation represents a pivotal moment in the origin of technology and in the evolution of our lineage. Thanks to Fabrizio De Rossi, Julio Lacerda and everyone else at Studio 252mya for their excellent hominin illustrations. You can find more of their work here: https://252mya.com/ Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Anthony Callaghan, XULIN GE, Po Foon Kwong, Larry Wilson, Merri Snaidman, Renzo Caimi, Ordenes, John Vanek, Neil H. Gray, Marilyn Wolmart, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Philip Slingerland, Jose Garcia, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/homo-erectus http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/homo-heidelbergensis https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/evidence-for-meat-eating-by-early-humans-103874273 https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/a-primer-on-paleolithic-technology-83034489 https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/homo-erectus-a-bigger-smarter-97879043 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05696-8 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/oldest-known-stone-tools-unearthed-kenya-180955341/ https://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/exhibit/oldowan-and-acheulean-stone-tools De Heinzelin, J., Clark, J. D., White, T., Hart, W., Renne, P., WoldeGabriel, G., ... & Vrba, E. (1999). Environment and behavior of 2.5-million-year-old Bouri hominids. Science, 284(5414), 625-629. Ferraro, J. V., Plummer, T. W., Pobiner, B. L., Oliver, J. S., Bishop, L. C., Braun, D. R., ... & Hertel, F. (2013). Earliest archaeological evidence of persistent hominin carnivory. PloS one, 8(4), e62174. Gabunia, L., Antón, S. C., Lordkipanidze, D., Vekua, A., Justus, A., & Swisher III, C. C. (2001). Dmanisi and dispersal. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews: Issues, News, and Reviews, 10(5), 158-170. Harmand, S., Lewis, J. E., Feibel, C. S., Lepre, C. J., Prat, S., Lenoble, A., ... & Taylor, N. (2015). 3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya. Nature, 521(7552), 310. Kappelman, J. (2018). An early hominin arrival in Asia. Nature, 480. Scott, G. R., & Gibert, L. (2009). The oldest hand-axes in Europe. Nature, 461(7260), 82. Stout, D., Toth, N., Schick, K., & Chaminade, T. (2008). Neural correlates of Early Stone Age toolmaking: technology, language and cognition in human evolution. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 363(1499), 1939-1949. Tuffreau, A., Lamotte, A., & Marcy, J. L. (1997). Land-use and site function in Acheulean complexes of the Somme Valley. World Archaeology, 29(2), 225-241. Williams-Hatala, E. M., Hatala, K. G., Gordon, M., Key, A., Kasper, M., & Kivell, T. L. (2018). The manual pressures of stone tool behaviors and their implications for the evolution of the human hand. Journal of human evolution, 119, 14-26. Zhu, Z., Dennell, R., Huang, W., Wu, Y., Qiu, S., Yang, S., ... & Ouyang, T. (2018). Hominin occupation of the Chinese Loess Plateau since about 2.1 million years ago. Nature, 559(7715), 608.
Views: 310691 PBS Eons
Scientific data archiving | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_data_archiving 00:02:51 1 Selected policies by journals 00:03:02 1.1 iBiotropica/i 00:05:11 1.2 iThe American Naturalist/i 00:06:20 1.3 iJournal of Heredity/i 00:08:06 1.4 iMolecular Ecology/i 00:09:12 1.5 iNature/i 00:10:17 1.6 iScience/i 00:11:20 1.7 Royal Society 00:12:02 1.8 iJournal of Archaeological Science/i 00:12:58 2 Policies by funding agencies 00:14:01 3 Data archives 00:14:17 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7552951769390689 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Research data archiving is the long-term storage of scholarly research data, including the natural sciences, social sciences, and life sciences. The various academic journals have differing policies regarding how much of their data and methods researchers are required to store in a public archive, and what is actually archived varies widely between different disciplines. Similarly, the major grant-giving institutions have varying attitudes towards public archival of data. In general, the tradition of science has been for publications to contain sufficient information to allow fellow researchers to replicate and therefore test the research. In recent years this approach has become increasingly strained as research in some areas depends on large datasets which cannot easily be replicated independently. Data archiving is more important in some fields than others. In a few fields, all of the data necessary to replicate the work is already available in the journal article. In drug development, a great deal of data is generated and must be archived so researchers can verify that the reports the drug companies publish accurately reflect the data. The requirement of data archiving is a recent development in the history of science. It was made possible by advances in information technology allowing large amounts of data to be stored and accessed from central locations. For example, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) adopted their first policy on data archiving in 1993, about three years after the beginning of the WWW. This policy mandates that datasets cited in AGU papers must be archived by a recognised data center; it permits the creation of "data papers"; and it establishes AGU's role in maintaining data archives. But it makes no requirements on paper authors to archive their data. Prior to organized data archiving, researchers wanting to evaluate or replicate a paper would have to request data and methods information from the author. The academic community expects authors to share supplemental data. This process was recognized as wasteful of time and energy and obtained mixed results. Information could become lost or corrupted over the years. In some cases, authors simply refuse to provide the information. The need for data archiving and due diligence is greatly increased when the research deals with health issues or public policy formation.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Science and technology of the Song dynasty | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_and_technology_of_the_Song_dynasty 00:01:37 1 Polymaths and mechanical engineering 00:01:48 1.1 Polymaths 00:06:59 1.2 Odometer and south-pointing chariot 00:12:06 1.3 Revolving repositories 00:15:15 1.4 Textile machinery 00:16:47 2 Movable type printing 00:20:07 3 Gunpowder warfare 00:20:16 3.1 Flamethrower 00:22:40 3.2 Fire lance 00:24:35 3.3 Gun 00:26:55 3.4 Land mine 00:27:52 3.5 Rocket 00:29:12 4 Civil engineering 00:37:25 5 Nautics 00:37:34 5.1 Background 00:38:32 5.2 Literature 00:46:29 5.3 Paddle-wheel ships 00:49:10 6 Metallurgy 00:53:13 7 Wind power 00:59:18 8 Archaeology 01:01:01 9 Geology and climatology 01:01:58 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7492067946333542 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝; 960–1279 CE) provided some of the most significant technological advances in Chinese history, many of which came from talented statesmen drafted by the government through imperial examinations. The ingenuity of advanced mechanical engineering had a long tradition in China. The Song engineer Su Song admitted that he and his contemporaries were building upon the achievements of the ancients such as Zhang Heng (78–139), an astronomer, inventor, and early master of mechanical gears. The application of movable type printing advanced the already widespread use of woodblock printing to educate and amuse Confucian students and the masses. The application of new weapons employing the use of gunpowder enabled the Song to ward off its militant enemies—the Liao, Western Xia, and Jin with weapons such as cannons—until its collapse to the Mongol forces of Kublai Khan in the late 13th century. Notable advances in civil engineering, nautics, and metallurgy were made in Song China, as well as the introduction of the windmill to China during the thirteenth century. These advances, along with the introduction of paper-printed money, helped revolutionize and sustain the economy of the Song dynasty.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
1574 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1574_in_science 00:00:09 1 Archaeology 00:00:42 2 Exploration 00:01:31 3 Mineralogy 00:02:08 4 Births 00:02:42 5 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7852231135103326 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1574 in science and technology involved some significant events.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Science in China | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China 00:01:14 1 Mo Di and the School of Names 00:04:14 2 Han Dynasty 00:06:09 3 "Four Great Inventions" 00:08:54 4 China's scientific revolution 00:10:36 4.1 Song Dynasty 00:13:18 4.1.1 Archaeology 00:14:52 4.1.2 Geology and climatology 00:15:49 4.2 Mongol transmission 00:17:23 4.3 Theory and hypothesis 00:20:27 4.4 Pharmacology 00:21:42 4.5 Horology and clockworks 00:23:28 4.6 Magnetism and metallurgy 00:25:05 4.7 Mathematics 00:25:54 4.8 Alchemy and Taoism 00:27:14 4.9 Gunpowder warfare 00:28:13 5 Jesuit activity in China 00:30:41 6 Scientific and technological stagnation 00:34:59 7 The Republic of China (1912–49) 00:35:54 8 People's Republic of China 00:38:07 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9342186147513624 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ancient Chinese scientists and engineers made significant scientific innovations, findings and technological advances across various scientific disciplines including the natural sciences, engineering, medicine, military technology, mathematics, geology and astronomy. Among the earliest inventions were the abacus, the "shadow clock," and the first items such as Kongming lanterns. The Four Great Inventions,the compass, gunpowder, papermaking, and printing – were among the most important technological advances, only known to Europe by the end of the Middle Ages 1000 years later. The Tang dynasty (AD 618–906) in particular was a time of great innovation. A good deal of exchange occurred between Western and Chinese discoveries up to the Qing dynasty. The Jesuit China missions of the 16th and 17th centuries introduced Western science and astronomy, then undergoing its own revolution, to China, and knowledge of Chinese technology was brought to Europe. In the 19th and 20th centuries the introduction of Western technology was a major factor in the modernization of China. Much of the early Western work in the history of science in China was done by Joseph Needham.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
#9 Sun, Moon, Swastikas and Deer - Eternal Symbols - Swastika
 
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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/294721540_Rock_art_in_Central_Asia_history_recent_developments_and_new_directions https://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=78131 https://journal.archaeology.nsc.ru/jour/article/viewFile/290/387 http://rockart.iaran.ru/pdf/miklashevich_e._news%20of%20the%20world%20i.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5751809/ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/03/science/native-americans-beringia-siberia.html http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/24000-year-old-boy-from-lake-baikal-is-scientific-sensation/ https://en.tuva.asia/142-first-people-of-the-baikal.html http://www.silkroadfoundation.org/newsletter/vol11/SilkRoad_11_2013_mock.pdf http://www.khyber.org/publications/046-050/shamanhunza.shtml http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/n0672-holding-hands-for-5000-years-a-couple-with-mysterious-jade-rings-and-dagger/ https://www.tibetarchaeology.com/ http://www.tibetanhistory.net/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Ramble-Navel-of-the-Demoness.pdf https://news.artsci.utoronto.ca/all-news/scientists-identify-7-2-million-year-old-pre-human-remains-balkans/ https://phys.org/news/2017-11-scientists-himalayan-rivers-ancient-indus.html https://eldermountaindreaming.com/2015/09/15/ancestress-of-the-magical-reindeer/ https://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/f0072-scientists-reveal-prehistoric-animal-lived-longer-than-previously-thought/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjhakri_and_Banjhakrini https://www.researchgate.net/publication/294721540_Rock_art_in_Central_Asia_history_recent_developments_and_new_directions https://en.tuva.asia/142-first-people-of-the-baikal.html https://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/21/science/two-surprises-in-dna-of-boy-found-buried-in-siberia.html?_r=0 https://treeofvisions.wordpress.com/2015/05/09/the-global-spread-of-shamanism/ https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10816-017-9328-0 http://himalaya.socanth.cam.ac.uk/collections/journals/ret/pdf/ret_42_01.pdf http://rockart.iaran.ru/pdf/miklashevich_e._news%20of%20the%20world%20i.pdf http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/rangifer.htm all materials are used for educational and recreational purposes only.
Views: 66 Ninth Heretic
1748 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1748_in_science 00:00:10 1 Archaeology 00:00:25 2 Chemistry 00:00:42 3 Earth sciences 00:01:22 4 Mathematics 00:02:27 5 Medicine 00:02:47 6 Technology 00:03:09 7 Publications 00:03:41 8 Awards 00:04:03 9 Births 00:05:24 10 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7150350872016353 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1748 in science and technology involved some significant events.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
1578 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1578_in_science 00:00:09 1 Archaeology 00:00:21 2 Medicine 00:01:02 3 Technology 00:01:24 4 Births 00:01:59 5 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9306495511259013 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1578 in science and technology included a number of events, some of which are listed here.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Scientific racism in the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:21:52
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_racism 00:02:45 1 Antecedents 00:02:54 1.1 Enlightenment thinkers 00:03:35 1.1.1 Robert Boyle vs. Henri de Boulainvilliers 00:06:16 1.1.2 Lord Kames 00:06:51 1.1.3 Carl Linnaeus 00:11:12 1.1.4 John Hunter 00:11:46 1.1.5 Charles White 00:12:58 1.1.6 Buffon and Blumenbach 00:15:06 1.1.7 Benjamin Rush 00:16:02 1.1.8 Christoph Meiners 00:20:11 1.2 Later thinkers 00:20:20 1.2.1 Thomas Jefferson 00:23:41 1.2.2 Samuel Stanhope Smith 00:24:16 1.2.3 Georges Cuvier 00:26:23 1.2.4 Arthur Schopenhauer 00:27:36 1.2.5 Franz Ignaz Pruner 00:28:26 2 Racial theories in physical anthropology, 1850–1918 00:29:39 2.1 Charles Darwin 00:36:12 2.2 Arthur de Gobineau 00:38:03 2.3 Karl Vogt 00:38:46 2.4 Herbert Hope Risley 00:39:12 2.5 Ernst Haeckel 00:40:53 2.6 Nationalism: de Lapouge and Herder 00:42:44 2.7 Craniometry and physical anthropology 00:44:04 2.7.1 Samuel George Morton 00:47:12 2.8 Nicolás Palacios 00:48:06 2.9 Monogenism and polygenism 00:49:15 2.10 Typologies 00:52:28 3 Ideological applications 00:52:38 3.1 Nordicism 00:53:51 3.2 Justification of slavery in the US 00:58:07 3.3 South African apartheid 01:01:07 3.4 Eugenics 01:04:09 4 Interbellum to World War II 01:05:04 4.1 Early intelligence testing and the Immigration Act of 1924 01:09:04 4.2 Sweden 01:10:38 4.3 Nazi Germany 01:13:46 4.4 United States 01:18:17 5 After 1945 Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9069369000171592 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Scientific racism (sometimes referred to as race biology), is the pseudoscientific belief that empirical evidence exists to support or justify racism (racial discrimination), racial inferiority, or racial superiority. Historically, scientific racist ideas received credence in the scientific community but are no longer considered scientific.Scientific racism employs anthropology (notably physical anthropology), anthropometry, craniometry, and other disciplines or pseudo-disciplines, in proposing anthropological typologies supporting the classification of human populations into physically discrete human races, that might be asserted to be superior or inferior. Scientific racism was common during the period from 1600s to the end of World War I. Since the second half of the 20th century, scientific racism has been criticized as obsolete and discredited, yet historically has persistently been used to support or validate racist world-views, based upon belief in the existence and significance of racial categories and a hierarchy of superior and inferior races.After the end of World War II, scientific racism in theory and action was formally denounced, especially in UNESCO's early antiracist statement "The Race Question" (1950): "The biological fact of race and the myth of 'race' should be distinguished. For all practical social purposes 'race' is not so much a biological phenomenon as a social myth. The myth of 'race' has created an enormous amount of human and social damage. In recent years, it has taken a heavy toll in human lives, and caused untold suffering". Such "biological fact" has not reached a consensus as developments in human evolutionary genetics showed that human genetic differences are often gradual.The term "scientific racism" is generally used pejoratively as applied to more modern theories, as in The Bell Curve (1994). Critics argue that such works postulate racist conclusions unsupported by available evidence such as a connection between race and intelligence. Publications such as the Mankind Quarterly, founded explicitly as a "race-conscious" journal, are generally regarded as platforms of scientific racism for publishing articles on fringe interpretations of human evolution, intelligence, ethnography, language, mythology, archaeology, and race subjects.
Views: 17 Subhajit Sahu
Once Rain Didn't Stop for 2 Million Years
 
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What if it never stopped raining? Are you sick and tired of rains that haven't stopped for weeks on end? Then consider yourself lucky that you didn't live in the Triassic Period, around 234 million years ago. That was the beginning of a really long rainy season... At the beginning of the Triassic period, the planet was sweltering, with the oceans hotter than your bathtub and the air full of carbon dioxide from constant volcanic eruptions. And the supercontinent Pangea was mostly a vast stretch of flat and dry land. However, this couldn't last forever. And approximately 234 million years ago, long-awaited rain fell. And everything would have been perfect if these rain hadn't continued for 2 million years! Other videos you might like: What If Dinosaurs Were Still Alive Today? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeFnH4xux7w Scientists Finally Show Who The Yeti Is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCKggQk_DY4& A New Continent Is Discovered on Earth In the Pacific Ocean https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMncyN_C-pQ& TIMESTAMPS: The deadliest mass extinction 0:42 What caused many creatures to die out 1:12 How did scientists learn about these events? 2:51 What could cause such extreme weather conditions 3:25 The transformation of the animal and plant world 4:52 How did dinosaurs get so big? 5:17 How the plant life of Earth changed after the rainfall 8:05 #dinosaurs #earthhistory #archeology Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Around 252 million years ago, 70% of terrestrial vertebrates, as well as 90% of marine creatures, were wiped off the surface of the planet. Animal and plant life on Earth couldn't fully recover from this catastrophe for the next 10 million years. - Sulfur emissions from burning coal made the oceans acidic, and this killed most marine species. Acid rains destroyed forests. Bacteria that lived on dead bodies started to produce hydrogen sulfide, toxic gas which finished off the remaining species. - Surprisingly, scientists managed to discover evidence of humid climate in entirely different places on the planet. This could only mean one thing: 234 million years ago, it was raining all over the world. - Approximately one or two million years before the "wet season" started, there were several massive volcanic eruptions on the territory of modern-day British Columbia and Alaska. These eruptions lasted for a whopping 5 million years! - After the volcanic activity continued for about one million years, Earth's atmosphere became so humid and warm that rain eventually managed to reach even the central parts of the supercontinent. The season of rains started. - There are many misconceptions about dinosaurs. First of all, forget about the image of a huge predator towering over trees. A significant number of dinosaurs were not bigger than a good old turkey! - Due to climate change, plant life on Earth changed dramatically. It thrived in the new tropical humid climate. Tall trees and lush greenery started to grow in abundance. And dinosaurs began to increase in size. - After revitalizing the planet, the monsoon season finally came to an end. The volcanic eruptions were slowing down at that time, and this also played a significant role in the stabilization of climate. - After the two-million-year-long rainfall, the plant life of Earth changed dramatically. There appeared many types of conifers which then spread all over the place. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 532697 BRIGHT SIDE
Scientific creationism | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creation_science 00:05:14 1 Beliefs and activities 00:05:24 1.1 Religious basis 00:06:36 1.2 Modern religious affiliations 00:07:51 1.3 Views on science 00:10:32 2 History 00:13:28 2.1 Court determinations 00:20:07 2.2 Intelligent design splits off 00:25:08 3 Issues 00:27:40 3.1 Metaphysical assumptions 00:30:39 3.2 Religious criticism 00:32:44 3.3 Scientific criticism 00:37:10 3.4 Historical, philosophical, and sociological criticism 00:38:33 4 Areas of study 00:38:43 4.1 Creationist biology 00:41:53 4.2 Earth sciences and geophysics 00:42:04 4.2.1 Flood geology 00:44:30 4.2.2 Radiometric dating 00:48:54 4.2.3 Radiohaloes 00:50:50 4.3 Astronomy and cosmology 00:51:00 4.3.1 Creationist cosmologies 00:52:29 4.3.2 Planetology 00:54:36 5 Groups 00:54:45 5.1 Proponents 00:55:10 5.2 Critics 00:55:49 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8144197470626566 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Creation science or scientific creationism is a branch of creationism that claims to provide scientific support for the Genesis creation narrative in the Book of Genesis and disprove or reexplain the scientific facts, theories and paradigms about geology, cosmology, biological evolution, archeology, history, and linguistics.The overwhelming consensus of the scientific community is that creation science fails to produce scientific hypotheses, and courts have ruled that it is a religious, not a scientific, view. It fails to qualify as a science because it lacks empirical support, supplies no tentative hypotheses, and resolves to describe natural history in terms of scientifically untestable supernatural causes. Creation science is a pseudoscientific attempt to map the Bible into scientific facts. It is viewed by professional biologists as unscholarly, and even as a dishonest and misguided sham, with extremely harmful educational consequences.Creation science began in the 1960s, as a fundamentalist Christian effort in the United States to prove Biblical inerrancy and nullify the scientific evidence for evolution. It has since developed a sizable religious following in the United States, with creation science ministries branching worldwide. The main ideas in creation science are: the belief in "creation ex nihilo" (Latin: out of nothing); the conviction that the Earth was created within the last 6,000–10,000 years; the belief that humans and other life on Earth were created as distinct fixed "baraminological" kinds; and the idea that fossils found in geological strata were deposited during a cataclysmic flood which completely covered the entire Earth. As a result, creation science also challenges the commonly accepted geologic and astrophysical theories for the age and origins of the Earth and universe, which creationists believe are irreconcilable with the account in the Book of Genesis. Creation science proponents often refer to the theory of evolution as "Darwinism" or as "Darwinian evolution." The creation science texts and curricula that first emerged in the 1960s focused upon concepts derived from a literal interpretation of the Bible and were overtly religious in nature, most notably linking Noah's flood in the Biblical Genesis account to the geological and fossil record in a system termed flood geology. These works attracted little notice beyond the schools and congregations of conservative fundamental and Evangelical Christians until the 1970s, when its followers challenged the teaching of evolution in the public schools and other venues in the United States, bringing it to the attention of the public-at-large and the scientific community. Many school boards and lawmakers were persuaded to include the teaching of creation science alongside evolution in the science curriculum. Creation science texts and curricula used in churches and Christian schools were revised to eliminate th ...
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
2019-02-06 Tripcevich et al, ARF Brownbag
 
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GPR and Gradiometry in the Hyper-Arid Atacama: Assessing Features Among Fossil Channels, Paleosols, and Lithic Dispersions at Quebrada Mani 35, Chile ARF Brownbag | February 6 2019 Speakers: Nicholas Tripcevich (Archaeological Research Facility); Scott Byram (Feature Survey, Inc); José M. Capriles (Penn State); Calogero M. Santoro (Universidad de Tarapacá, Chile) In the hyper-arid core of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile dozens of Terminal Pleistocene archaeological sites have been located in an area that previously held seasonal surface water channels and a riparian landscape. These sites shed light on the early peopling of western South America because the sites have had little disturbance with the ensuing extreme aridity for most of the Holocene. Here we present preliminary results from geophysical research in December of 2018 at the site of Quebrada Mani 35 employing GPR and gradiometer funded by the PCI Project PII20150081 and an institutional collaboration between Universidad de Tarapaca in Chile and University of California, Berkeley. At QM 35, archaeological features distributed along east-west fossil stream channels that transported Andean water west towards pluvial basins have been dated between 12.5 to 11.2k cal BP. In addition, horse, ground sloth, camelid and rodent remains are present along with extensive botanical remains and concentrations of lithics. GPR and gradiometer data show numerous geomorphic features that tell us about the site setting, and possible cultural features awaiting further testing.  Author Biographies Nico Tripcevich is the laboratory manager at the ARF. He received his PhD in 2007 from UC Santa Barbara and has been working in the Andean region for twenty years. He specialises in geospatial applications in archaeology, geophysical methods, and obsidian XRF. He co-edited Mining and Quarrying in the Ancient Andes (Springer 2012) and The Archaeology of Andean Pastoralism (Univ of New Mexico Press 2016) http://arf.berkeley.edu/arf-people/nicholas-tripcevich Scott Byram regularly performs ground-penetrating radar projects in California and the Pacific Northwest. He has collaborated in GPR studies with researchers at several universities on three continents and Oceania, and often works with Native communities on non-destructive approaches to site assessment. Byram received his PhD from the University of Oregon and he began an ARF research affiliate in 2007. His publications cover topics such as GPR, archaeological method and theory, landscape archaeology, and Native American ethnohistory. Byram's research has greatly expanded the study of features such as intertidal fishing weirs and buried adobe walls. He takes a holistic approach to past landscape reconstruction, often incorporating in depth archival research, and relying on his extensive experience in excavation and site survey in coastal, alluvial, montane and desert settings. http://www.featuresurvey.com/index.html José M. Capriles is Assistant Professor at Penn State’s Department of Anthropology. He is an anthropological archaeologist specializing in environmental archaeology, South American archaeology, and zooarchaeology. His research focuses on humans adaptations to the extreme environments, economic and ecological processes involved in the development of early camelid pastoralism and other food production economies, and the emergence and expansion of complex societies. http://anth.la.psu.edu/people/juc555 Calogero M. Santoro is Full Professor of Archaeology in the Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Chile. For more than 40 years he has conducted broad based interdisciplinary research on the South American archaeology, covering topics from long-term cultural process of adaptation and environmental changes, social complexity among maritime societies, rock art, and Andean macro-regional interaction. He has published about 200 articles, scientific books, and general outreach texts. This interdisciplinary and inter-institutional research has integrated undergraduate and postgraduate students, postdoctoral, and specialized scholars from Chile and other countries in the Americas, Australia and Europe. He has received a number of national and international research grants and has taught in Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and France. http://iai.uta.cl/investigador/calogero-santoro-vargas/
Nubiology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nubiology 00:00:26 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7703752568513056 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Nubiology is the designation given to the primarily archaeological science that specialises in the scientific study of Ancient Nubia and its antiquities. It is sometimes also applied to scientists who study other ancient lands and cultures south of Ancient Egypt. The term was coined by Kazimierz Michałowski.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Heritage science | Wikipedia audio article
 
13:31
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heritage_science 00:01:49 1 Theory 00:04:36 2 Research 00:07:18 3 Education 00:09:48 4 Professional Activities 00:12:08 5 Events 00:13:05 6 Journals Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7637190277351256 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Heritage science is cross-disciplinary scientific research of cultural heritage. It is the application of science and technology to heritage to improve understanding, engagement and its long-term management . The term has become widely used after 2006 when it became increasingly evident that the more traditional terms conservation science or preservation science inadequately reflected the breadth of research into cultural heritage. Heritage scientists in museums, galleries, libraries, archives, universities and research institutions support conservation (often called conservation science), access (e.g. development of new ICT tools), interpretation, including archaeometry and archaeological science (e.g. dating, provenancing, attribution), heritage management (e.g. development of tools and knowledge supporting strategic or environmental management decisions) and wider societal engagement with heritage (e.g. heritage values and ethics). Heritage science is also an excellent vehicle for public engagement with science as well as heritage. Heritage science is seen as "key to the long-term sustainability of heritage: it is about managing change and risk and maximising social, cultural and economic benefit not just today, but in such a way that we can pass on to future generations that which we have inherited." Domains of research, where heritage science makes a particular input were recognised to be museums, galleries, libraries and archives; the built historic environment and archaeology, by the United Kingdom National Heritage Science Strategy documents.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
1859 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1859_in_science 00:00:11 1 Archaeology 00:00:41 2 Astronomy 00:02:11 3 Biology 00:03:59 4 Chemistry 00:04:44 5 Climatology 00:05:08 6 Geography 00:05:27 7 Mathematics 00:06:04 8 Medicine 00:06:35 9 Technology 00:07:30 10 Physics 00:07:50 11 Awards 00:08:15 12 Births 00:10:59 13 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7191029716336818 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1859 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below.
Views: 1 Subhajit Sahu
1928 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
09:25
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1928_in_science 00:00:09 1 Anthropology 00:00:29 2 Archaeology 00:00:43 3 Biology 00:01:25 4 Chemistry 00:01:43 5 Computer science 00:02:17 6 History of science 00:02:33 7 Mathematics 00:03:00 8 Medicine 00:03:34 9 Physics 00:04:04 10 Technology 00:05:30 11 Publications 00:05:49 12 Awards 00:06:12 13 Births 00:08:31 14 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9559801601324989 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1928 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Chinese science | Wikipedia audio article
 
53:11
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China 00:01:46 1 Mo Di and the School of Names 00:05:57 2 Han Dynasty 00:08:34 3 "Four Great Inventions" 00:12:20 4 China's scientific revolution 00:14:39 4.1 Song Dynasty 00:18:18 4.1.1 Archaeology 00:20:25 4.1.2 Geology and climatology 00:21:39 4.2 Mongol transmission 00:23:49 4.3 Theory and hypothesis 00:27:58 4.4 Pharmacology 00:29:42 4.5 Horology and clockworks 00:32:10 4.6 Magnetism and metallurgy 00:34:24 4.7 Mathematics 00:35:32 4.8 Alchemy and Taoism 00:37:24 4.9 Gunpowder warfare 00:38:44 5 Jesuit activity in China 00:42:11 6 Scientific and technological stagnation 00:48:03 7 The Republic of China (1912–49) 00:49:19 8 People's Republic of China 00:52:19 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7358381049246331 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ancient Chinese scientists and engineers made significant scientific innovations, findings and technological advances across various scientific disciplines including the natural sciences, engineering, medicine, military technology, mathematics, geology and astronomy. Among the earliest inventions were the abacus, the "shadow clock," and the first items such as Kongming lanterns. The Four Great Inventions,the compass, gunpowder, papermaking, and printing – were among the most important technological advances, only known to Europe by the end of the Middle Ages 1000 years later. The Tang dynasty (AD 618–906) in particular was a time of great innovation. A good deal of exchange occurred between Western and Chinese discoveries up to the Qing dynasty. The Jesuit China missions of the 16th and 17th centuries introduced Western science and astronomy, then undergoing its own revolution, to China, and knowledge of Chinese technology was brought to Europe. In the 19th and 20th centuries the introduction of Western technology was a major factor in the modernization of China. Much of the early Western work in the history of science in China was done by Joseph Needham.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
1898 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1898_in_science 00:00:08 1 Archaeology 00:00:23 2 Astronomy 00:00:50 3 Biology 00:01:08 4 Chemistry 00:02:07 5 Exploration 00:02:37 6 Mathematics 00:03:01 7 Medicine 00:03:48 8 Meteorology 00:04:03 9 Awards 00:04:19 10 Births 00:05:54 11 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9984726187909267 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1898 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
1994 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1994_in_science 00:00:10 1 Archaeology and paleontology 00:01:04 2 Astronomy and space exploration 00:02:21 3 Biology and medicine 00:03:52 4 Chemistry 00:04:31 5 Computer science 00:05:57 6 Earth sciences 00:06:17 7 Mathematics 00:06:56 8 Molecular biology 00:07:16 9 Technology 00:08:12 10 Awards 00:09:00 11 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7716418797097586 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1994 in science and technology involved many significant events, listed below.
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Social scientist | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_science 00:01:48 1 History 00:07:38 2 Branches 00:08:25 2.1 Anthropology 00:12:59 2.2 Communication studies 00:14:58 2.3 Economics 00:18:25 2.4 Education 00:20:09 2.5 Geography 00:22:37 2.6 History 00:23:44 2.7 Law 00:25:49 2.8 Linguistics 00:28:12 2.9 Political science 00:30:32 2.10 Psychology 00:34:35 2.11 Sociology 00:42:10 3 Additional fields of study 00:47:10 4 Methodology 00:47:19 4.1 Social research 00:52:38 4.2 Theory 00:55:39 5 Education and degrees 00:56:52 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8297736775459225 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Social science is a category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society. Social science as a whole has many branches. These social sciences include, but are not limited to: anthropology, archaeology, communication studies, economics, history, human geography, jurisprudence, linguistics, political science, psychology, public health, and sociology. The term is also sometimes used to refer specifically to the field of sociology, the original "science of society", established in the 19th century. For a more detailed list of sub-disciplines within the social sciences see: Outline of social science. Positivist social scientists use methods resembling those of the natural sciences as tools for understanding society, and so define science in its stricter modern sense. Interpretivist social scientists, by contrast, may use social critique or symbolic interpretation rather than constructing empirically falsifiable theories, and thus treat science in its broader sense. In modern academic practice, researchers are often eclectic, using multiple methodologies (for instance, by combining both quantitative and qualitative research). The term "social research" has also acquired a degree of autonomy as practitioners from various disciplines share in its aims and methods.
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Scientists find ancient life buried beneath Antarctic ice - TomoNews
 
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ANTARCTICA — Researchers have discovered remains of tiny sea creatures deep beneath the ice in Antarctica, according to a report published in Nature. SOURCES: Nature, Fox News, Subglacial Antarctic Lakes Scientific Access https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00106-z https://www.foxnews.com/science/scientists-exploring-antarctic-buried-under-ice-find-surprising-signs-of-ancient-life https://salsa-antarctica.org/ Our favorite VPN: Private Internet Access ►►http://bit.ly/TomoNewsVPN Stuff we use to make TomoNews ►►https://www.amazon.com/shop/tomonewsus TomoNews is your best source for real news. We cover the funniest, craziest and most talked-about stories on the internet. If you’re laughing, we’re laughing. If you’re outraged, we’re outraged. We tell it like it is. And because we can animate stories, TomoNews brings you news like you’ve never seen before. Top TomoNews Stories - The most popular videos on TomoNews! http://bit.ly/Top_TomoNews_Stories You Idiot! - People doing stupid things http://bit.ly/You-Idiot Recent Uploads - The latest stories brought to you by TomoNews http://bit.ly/Latest-TomoNews Ultimate TomoNews Compilations - Can't get enough of TomoNews? This playlist is for you! New videos every day http://bit.ly/Ulitmate_TomoNews_Compi... Thanks for watching TomoNews! Like TomoNews on Facebook ►► http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Follow us on Twitter ►► @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Follow us on Instagram ►► @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus Subscribe to TomoNews ►► http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-TomoNews Watch more TomoNews ►► http://bit.ly/MoreTomoNews Visit our website for all the latest videos: http://us.tomonews.com Check out our Android app: http://bit.ly/1rddhCj Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f Get top stories delivered to your inbox every day: http://bit.ly/tomo-newsletter
Views: 11997 TomoNews US