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Active Teaching and Learning  Strategies
 
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A 40 minute workshop using a list of 228 active learning approaches by Dr. Jace Hargis in July 2016.
Views: 17367 Jace Hargis
Steps on How to Teach in an Active Learning Classroom  - Steelcase Education
 
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Active learning classrooms require different planning and teaching strategies than traditional classrooms. Steelcase Education offers a few basic steps to get started.
Views: 80758 Steelcase
What is Active Learning?
 
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Discusses what active learning is and provides examples of how active learning can be used in both face to face and online classes.
Views: 247372 NWIACOMMCOLLEGE
Active Learning Strategies
 
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Here are 9 active learning methods that all teachers would find exciting to be used in classrooms. This will help in creating student-centered classrooms instead of teacher-centered ones.
Views: 1869 Nour Chahine
Active Learning Strategies
 
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Views: 6344 Katie Rice
The Jigsaw Method
 
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This cooperative learning strategy increases student engagement, encourages collaboration, and results in better learning. Learn how to use the basic Jigsaw method, another variation called Jigsaw II, and get tips for troubleshooting, like what to do if you can't divide students evenly.
Views: 150440 Cult of Pedagogy
Examples of Active Learning
 
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Three short examples of peer instruction. Shot in classrooms at Harvard, Boston University, and Colorado Boulder, these examples show peer instruction in action.
Views: 9150 CIRTL MOOC
5. Teaching Methodologies, Part II: Active Learning: Why and How
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin This class explores the value and impact of active learning techniques in the classroom. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 7008 MIT OpenCourseWare
Teaching with Technology: Active Learning Strategies
 
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Active Learning Strategies for Asynchronous Online Students: An Example from CHEMENG 150 ( Biochemical Engineering) with Lisa Hwang.
Active Learning Strategies Part 1
 
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Dr. Shelley Howell, UTSA Teaching and Learning Consultant, presents 5 active learning strategies you can use in your classroom today.
6 Brain-Based Learning Strategies #Paperslide | Dr. Lodge McCammon
 
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http://lodgemccammon.com Everyone watching this has a brain and all of our brains function in similar ways when it comes to learning. The following is a formula that any instructor can use every day to enhance the learning experience for their students….and this formula provides the research foundation for what I call the McCammon method of teaching. So, here are 6 practical brain-based strategies that any teacher can use tomorrow to increase retention of information while giving all learners a chance to improve their communication and collaboration skills. Brain research suggests that students should... Receive information in short segments This increases the student’s ability to focus on the content, and is great for addressing learners with limited attention spans A rule of thumb here: try to present in chunks of 2 minutes or less for grades K-3, 4 minutes or less for grades 4-8, and 6 minutes or less for grade 9 to Adult Learners Video lectures are ideal for delivering these short segments. They ensure an exact length and keep the teacher from being distracted by cognitive interruptions that happen frequently during live lecture. They also ensure that the content is consistent for all students and that the information is fully covered in every lesson. Finally, the video lectures can be extremely concise and efficient - they can be 60-80% shorter than live lectures covering the same information. Immediately use the content after each segment After each chunk of content is delivered, we can challenge students to discuss the information, putting it in their own words. They should be encouraged to connect it to their life experiences, discuss these connections with peers, and ask clarifying questions. One of the best assignments we can give students after they view each chunk is to simply ask them to teach it back to us. It’s a great way to know if they learned what we wanted them to learn Review the content multiple times throughout each lesson Repetition solidifies the information in the brain Students receive the content by way of these short video chunks, which they can review again at a later time, and as many times as needed. This creates a self-paced learning resource. The students also repurpose and review the content after each video chunk when they collaborate, discuss and teach it back Switch tasks early & often This will constantly refocus student attention and increase engagement Here is one way to think about doing this. Play a 5-minute video segment Then give the students 5 minutes to collaborate and reteach the segment Spend 5 minutes recording a few exemplar student lessons And take another 5 minutes to watch and discuss the student video presentations Spending 20 minutes on this active learning experience can be much more impactful than simply lecturing on the same information for 20 minutes, while students are passive. Develop an emotional connection with the content A best practice here is to get students to create something showcasing their ideas, fingerprints, and voice so they own each segment. One of the best and most efficient assignments is to again have students teach-back the content, having them create and record their version of every lesson. A very powerful strategy for getting students to make an emotional connection to the content is to have them sit in front of a camera and be the teacher...and then afterwards watch their performance on screen. They will experience excitement and cognitive dissonance. This form of reflective practice can be an extremely emotional experience for any learner. And that emotion is tied directly to the content. Finally...Get up and move as much as possible Standing and moving around any classroom promotes blood flow to the brain Movement can increase memory, creativity, attention, and achievement Here’s a best practice: while the collaboration, discussion and teach-back assignments are going on, students can be put in groups that are required move around the classroom using whiteboards on the walls to prepare and present their lessons. Just remember, having students of any age sit for long periods of time is not optimal for their learning. So, if tomorrow’s lesson plan is that you are going to tell students a bunch of information and hope or expect them to remember...use these strategies instead. Students will retain more of the information and it will give them a chance to improve their communication and collaboration skills.
What is Active Learning?
 
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Please view my TEDx talk at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQcc1AiaFL0 Active Learning is explained and demonstrated in this short video. www.teachingrocks.com Hello friends, my name is Troy Wittmann, and I want to help teachers engage their students in the learning process. After two decades of teaching, I have discovered one absolute truth: our students want to be active participants in the learning process. Fortunately, the days of "chalk and talk" or the teacher being the lone "sage on the stage" are becoming less prevalent. Today students want and deserve more. An old Native American expression captures this sentiment perfectly: "Tell me and I will forget. Show me and I may not remember. Involve me and I will understand." I have written a book and completed a video series on Active Learning. The book is entitled: 33⅓ Active Learning Strategies. It comes with a companion set of eight DVD's and one futuristic, musical CD. The DVD's contain 33⅓ separate HD videos with an average runtime of 15 minutes. The Active Learning Strategies explained in the book and on the DVD's can be used from elementary through high school and even for adult learners. All you need to do is adjust the questions and statements to meet your goals and objectives. Of course, these strategies may also be used to address local, state, and Common Core Standards. One specific method of engaging our students that my faith has inspired me with is known simply as the Teachingrocks Time Machine™. I can't wait to show you how it all works. Thank you, Troy Wittmann Teacher www.teachingrocks.com
Views: 7831 Troy Wittmann
What is ACTIVE LEARNING? What does ACTIVE LEARNING mean? ACTIVE LEARNING meaning & explanation
 
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What is ACTIVE LEARNING? What does ACTIVE LEARNING mean? ACTIVE LEARNING meaning - ACTIVE LEARNING definition - ACTIVE LEARNING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Active learning is a teaching method that strives to more directly involve students in the learning process. The term active learning "was introduced by the English scholar R W Revans (1907–2003)." Bonwell (1991) "states that in active learning, students participate in the process and students participate when they are doing something besides passively listening." (Weltman, p. 7) Active learning is "a method of learning in which students are actively or experientially involved in the learning process and where there are different levels of active learning, depending on student involvement." (Weltman, p. 8) It is a model of instruction that focuses the responsibility of learning on learners. It was popularized in the 1990s by its appearance on the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) report (Bonwell & Eison 1991). In this report they discuss a variety of methodologies for promoting "active learning". They cite literature that indicates that to learn, students must do more than just listen: They must read, write, discuss, or be engaged in solving problems. It relates to the three learning domains referred to as knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA), and that this taxonomy of learning behaviours can be thought of as "the goals of the learning process" (Bloom, 1956). In particular, students must engage in such higher-order thinking tasks as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Active learning engages students in two aspects – doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell and Eison, 1991). There are diverse range of alternatives for the term "active learning" like learning through play, technology based learning, activity based learning, group work, project method, etc. the underlying factor behind these are some significant qualities and characteristics of active learning. Active learning is the opposite of passive learning; it is learner-centered, not teacher-centered, and requires more than just listening; active participation of each and every student is a necessary aspect in active learning. Students must be doing things and simultaneously think about the work done and the purpose behind it so that they can enhance their higher order thinking capabilities. Many research studies have proven that active learning as a strategy has promoted achievement levels and some others say that content mastery is possible through active learning strategies. However, some students as well as teachers find it difficult to adapt to the new learning technique. Active learning should transform students from passive listeners to active participants, helps the student understand the subject through inquiry, gathering and analyzing data to solving higher order cognitive problems. There is intensive use of scientific and quantitative literacy across the curriculum and technology based learning is also in high demand in concern with active learning. Barnes (1989) suggested principles of active learning: 1. Purposive: the relevance of the task with the students' concerns. 2. Reflective: students' reflection on the meaning of what is learnt. 3. Negotiated: negotiation of goals and methods of learning between students and teachers. 4. Critical: students appreciate different ways and means of learning the content. 5. Complex: students compare learning tasks with complexities existing in real life and making reflective analysis. 6. Situation-driven: the need of the situation is considered in order to establish learning tasks. 7. Engaged: real life tasks are reflected in the activities conducted for learning. Active learning requires appropriate learning environments through the implementation of correct strategy. Characteristics of learning environment are: 1. Aligned with constructivist strategies and evolved from traditional philosophies. 2. Promoting research based learning through investigation and contains authentic scholarly content. 3. Encouraging leadership skills of the students through self-development activities. 4. Creating atmosphere suitable for collaborative learning for building knowledgeable learning communities. 5. Cultivating a dynamic environment through interdisciplinary learning and generating high-profile activities for better learning experience. 6. Integration of prior knowledge with new ones to incur rich structure of knowledge among the students. 7. Task based performance enhancement by giving the student's a realistic practical sense of the subject matter learnt in the classroom.
Views: 2790 The Audiopedia
Classroom Activity Lesson Plans for Active Learning | SPARKabc's
 
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SPARKabc's (Activity Break Choices) is an exciting new program that helps classroom teachers use physical activity to improve academic achievement and foster healthy behaviors. Classroom Physical Activity SPARKabc's is a complete solution for providing enjoyable and engaging physical activity opportunities in the classroom. Content includes Classroom ASAP's (Active Soon As Possible) as well as physical activities that support learning standards in Literacy/Language Arts, STEM, Social Studies, Nutrition Education, and the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Like Us - http://www.facebook.com/pages/SPARK-Programs/119012390980 Follow Us - http://twitter.com/SPARK_Programs Pin Us - http://www.pinterest.com/sparkprograms/ Instagram Us - http://instagram.com/spark_programs
Views: 47662 sparksandiego
Mr. Yasser  Active Learning Strategies
 
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Grammar - Future Forms- Active Learning Strategies
Views: 56 Yasser Mahfouz
Effective Active Learning Techniques
 
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Active learning is a student-centered approach in which planned activities are used to engage the student as an active participant in their learning. Techniques such as guided questioning, think-pair-share, one-minute paper, and other such exercises improve student retention of material, and can enhance the traditional lecture format. However, active learning strategies can be difficult for new teaching assistants to implement because they require preparation and skills in guiding and moderating the learning activity. This workshop examines the planning system necessary to incorporate such activities, and attendees actively participate in numerous active learning techniques applicable to a wide range of classroom settings. They also learn helpful tips on what you can do, how to do it, and why active learning in the classroom is important to student learning.
Views: 14302 UnivSouthCarolinaCTE
Active Learning: 3 Easy Ways for Higher Education Lectures
 
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This recording walks faculty in health professions education through 3 evidence-supported approaches to active learning. The goal is to help you learn the method and strategies for success of 3 active learning methods that should be relatively easy to incorporate into your teaching practice.
Active Learning Strategy: Beach Ball
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin discusses how using the beach ball strategy, in combination with meaningful questions, encourages students to actively participate in classroom discussions. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2864 MIT OpenCourseWare
5 Classroom Engagement Strategies To Create Active Learners
 
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Students today are constantly stimulated, which can make our job as educators more difficult. These 5 strategies can be implemented into any content area with little to no preparation. Tune in to learn about the strategies and download the free templates at www.dailylessonplan.com/engagement
Views: 8544 Emily Du Plessis
Techniques of Teaching Vocabulary  , Active Learning طرق تعلم اللغة الانجليزية ، التعلم النشط
 
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Teaching new academic words is always a tough mission, you have to make it easier for students to learn by adding fun, activities, and competitions inside the classroom. I hope you enjoy the video. Teaching Learning English Language Classroom Management Classroom Activities Teaching Methods Teaching Techniques Active Learning
Views: 265 Mr. Mohamed Shalaby
Active Learning: Ways to Engage Students Inside and Outside the Classroom
 
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Rachel Gordon from Columbia University School of Medicine speaks about a variety of tested active learning methods and ways to incorporate them in one’s class in with a focus on interactive, online environments. She presents data on student attention and explains the best time frame to engage students in an activity such as audience polling (every 8-10 minutes, if not more often). She also presents techniques such as Just in Time Teaching and online case studies. Finally, she highlights the benefits of blogging as a method for faculty to share resources with students and teaching techniques with one another Subscribe to ASM's YouTube channel at https://goo.gl/mOVHlK Learn more about the American Society for Microbiology at http://www.asm.org Become a member today at http://www.asmscience.org/join Interact with us on social at: Facebook Show your support and get updates on the latest microbial offerings and news from the ASM. http://www.facebook.com/asmfan ASM International Facebook Groups Join an ASM International Facebook Group and connect with microbiologists in your region. http://www.asm.org/index.php/programs/asm-international-facebook-groups Twitter Follow all the latest news from the Society. http://www.twitter.com/ASMicrobiology Instagram Outstanding images of your favorite viruses, fungi, bacteria and parasites http://www.instagram.com/asmicrobiology/
An Active Learning Math Class
 
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This video illustrates how active learning strategies can be effectively used in a mathematics classroom. In this class, Socratic lecturing, clicker questions, and peer discussions are used. Groups work on “challenge questions” with on-demand guidance from the circulating instructor, which is followed by an instructor-guided whole class discussion. Helpful tips about what to look for in this video along with supporting materials and references are available at http://blogs.ubc.ca/wpvc/ Additional resources on teaching and learning are available on the UBC Skylight and CWSEI pages. http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/
Views: 157 ubcscience
Inside Active Learning Classrooms
 
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The new Science Teaching and Student Services building at the University of Minnesota will have 10 Active Learning Classrooms. Active Learning Classrooms allow for students to experience a more interactive and conversational educational environment. With round tables for discussion and high-tech accessories for interactivity, these classrooms will service more than 125 class sections this fall.
Active Learning Strategy: Debates
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes using debates to engage students in active learning and shares advice with educators using this strategy with students for the first time. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1725 MIT OpenCourseWare
How To Practice Active Learning? Effective Active Learning Techniques
 
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Active learning is a process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Active learning is a process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Cooperative learning, problem-based learning, and the use of case methods and simulations are some approaches that promote active learning. This lesson teaches you how to research summaries, articles, and other resources and be an active learner. You can watch the entire course here:- https://goo.gl/PKWY2a For more lessons/courses on Preparation, please visit:- www.unacademy.com
Views: 14233 Unacademy
Active Learning Strategies
 
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This module is a part Iowa State University's CELT Teaching Symposium for the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT): http://www.celt.iastate.edu
Views: 1241 isucelt
Applying Active Learning Strategies in class_ Mr. Ahmed Sayed
 
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Applying Active Learning Strategies in class. Presented by Mr. Ahmed Sayed Mohammed Saad. Abdel_Rahman Fakieh Model Schools in Mekkah. Saudi Arabia Applying few active learning Strategies in one class. Think_Pair_Share Four_Corners Jigsaw Mingling
Views: 1795 Ahmed Saad
Active Learning Overview
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes active learning and how she introduces this concept to students who may not have had active learning experiences prior to taking the course. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 8205 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Classrooms
 
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"The Transformation of Teaching and Learning in Active Learning Classrooms" with David J. Matthes, College of Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota Applying active learning strategies to biology courses in a flipped classroom environment. University of Wisconsin, Stout, Menomonie, WI. Feb. 5, 2014.
Active Learning Classrooms: Teaching Strategies and Student Engagement - part 1
 
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In this video segment Carleton University’s instructors talk about teaching strategies that worked well in an active learning classroom TB 431. They also talk about ways in which students reacted to this type of learning space.
Views: 73 videoedc
Peer Instruction for Active Learning - Eric Mazur
 
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Source - http://serious-science.org/videos/1136 Harvard University Prof. Eric Mazur on difficulties of beginners, teaching each other, and making sense of information
Views: 59601 Serious Science
Active Learning: Higher Ed Teaching & Learning
 
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Passive learning methods like lectures, readings and demonstrations remain the mainstay in higher ed, but research tells us that active learning approaches can have much more lasting impact on student learning outcomes. From small group discussions and project-based learning to experiential field schools and peer teaching, in this episode Ken sums up some compelling evidence from UBC, Queen's, and Guelph that seem to demonstrate that students learn significantly more from deliberate practice and enquiry-based learning than from lecture. Students who collaboratively observe a video of a tutoring session - not a lecture - learn better. Those who made mistakes and were then corrected learned 60% more than those who were guided straight to the correct answer. There are lasting benefits to enquiry-based learning seminars, particularly for "B" students. Queen's has opened Ellis Hall, a new facility featuring active learning classrooms. https://youtu.be/bJDCgeaK44E 80% of Generation Z prefer to study with friends, and 40% will do so on Skype if not in person. That social orientation of students may be driving the creation of learning commons and social space on campuses from St Mary's U to the U of Calgary. Small adjustments to the lecture theatre can improve student engagement. George Brown College's new learning studios allow classes to shift from lecture to group discussions and back. Iowa State U has installed seats that swivel 240 degrees in double-wide rows that allow for group work. Oregon State U opened the new Learning Innovation Center last fall, including 2 "in the round" lecture halls that hold 600 students, all within 15 feet of the instructor. Active learning classrooms date back at least 20 years, to the SCALE-UP classrooms at North Carolina State U. Students sit in clusters of 9, and students learn better 88% of the time (particularly female students). The model has been emulated at hundreds of campuses. UBC's Sauder School of Business recently opened a Flexible Learning Lab. https://youtu.be/LA4Sqb4jrlw Next week: Experiential Learning. Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode! www.eduvation.ca/subscribe Just #ICYMI, check out Red River College's new commercial, featuring plenty of active learning: https://youtu.be/giUez0f-N2g
Views: 1741 Eduvation
Active Learning Strategy: Jigsaw
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes the jigsaw active learning strategy. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1828 MIT OpenCourseWare
Creative and active teaching and learning: Dr. John Zubizarreta at TEDxColumbiaSC
 
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Professor of English and director of Honors and Faculty Development at Columbia College. In 2010, he was named U.S. Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation.
Views: 180360 TEDx Talks
Active learning in English classes
 
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NIS Uralsk English teachers
Views: 1640 NIS Uralsk PD
Aflatoun Active Learning Methods: The Jigsaw Method
 
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This is one of a series of instructional animation made for The Aflatoun Educational Platform project in cooperation with and support of Orange Foundation. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/W305/
Active learning English ( Part 1)
 
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Al Mostakbal Language School
Active Learning Classrooms: Transforming Teaching and Learning
 
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Learn more about Indiana University's exciting Mosaic Initiative, which strives to support active and collaborative learning, and the unique active learning classroom environments that help to make it possible.
Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom
 
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Active Learning and Flipped Classrooms are popular approaches in higher education pedagogy. This seminar provides examples of successful active learning activities from HORT 1001 Plant Propagation and explores ideas to help you make use of an Active Learning Classroom to enrich student learning in your class. Presentation slides available at http://z.umn.edu/activelearninghort. Handouts available at http://z.umn.edu/activelearninghortho,
Active Learning Strategy: Mud Cards
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes how she uses mud cards as an active learning strategy. She also offers advice to educators who are considering using this strategy in their own classrooms. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1393 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Strategies Part 2
 
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Dr. Shelley Howell, UTSA Teaching and Learning Consultant, presents part 2 of her active learning strategies session, with 10 more active learning tips for the college classroom.
Effective Teaching Strategies for Biology | TrinityX on edX | Course About Video
 
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Take this course for free on edX: https://www.edx.org/course/effective-teaching-strategies-biology-trinityx-t003x ↓ More info below. ↓ Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/edX Follow on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/edxonline Follow on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/edxonline About this course In this education and teacher training course we will explore effective teaching methods for biology. We will emphasize approaches proven to be effective and show you how to easily implement them. We will also give you the opportunity to reflect on your own teaching experience and exchange ideas and share challenges with other learners in the course. We will begin by looking at the most common method of teaching science, the lecture. We’ll discuss what the lecture method does well and look at data that illustrates when it is less effective. You will hear highly successful teachers talk about their experience with lecture and how they modified their lecture time to more actively engage students. We’ll investigate creating learning objectives and how they can be used to communicate your expectations to students. You will practice writing your own learning objectives and see how they can streamline exam construction. We’ll look at a variety of ways to include active learning during class time, discuss how active learning strategies support your learning objectives, and give you practice developing learning activities for biology topics you find challenging to teach. Lastly, we’ll look at how to use resources for student learning outside of class, and how to know that your students have successfully learned from both in-class and outside of class activities. Our course is designed for instructors, or instructors-to-be, of undergraduate-level biology. High school instructors of AP Biology, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students looking ahead to teaching should find the course useful. The course can serve as a means of professional development. There are no pre-requisites, although prior satisfactory completion of a college biology course is highly recommended.
Views: 8617 edX
Student Engagement & Motivation Strategies & Tips.wmv
 
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This video will help teachers with classroom management to provide an effective learning environment by creating a culture of engagement and motivation for their middle school students. Administrators can also use this video to provide staff development to their teachers and staff helping them with classroom management and engagement. This video emphasizes engagement, motivation, building relationships, and Checking for Understanding (CFU). This is part two which is more about engagement and motivation to provide opportunity for student and teacher success. Learning cannot happen without a safe, secure, and comfortable learning environment for students that provides engagement and makes students feel valued. All stakeholders; administrators, teachers, and students will benefit from the tips and strategies illustrated in this video. These tips are based on twenty years of experience as a teacher and principal with middle school students, especially students of color, poverty, and English language learners (ELL). The author/ creator of this video has been influenced by other experts in the field; Michael Grinder, Harry Wong, Ruby Payne, and Robert Marzano all of which have great ideas to help teachers provide effective and engaging classrooms. Helpful hints are listed to get the teacher started from the very first day of class. Not only can middle school teachers use these tips and strategies, but 4th grade, 5th grade, 6th grade, 7th grade, 8th grade, and 9th grade teachers can find valuable information in these videos and the accompanying webpage. Test scores and learning in general will improve with effective and engaging classroom management. Building relationships, communicating expectations, and accountability will provide the keys to reaching students to teach them effectively. These strategies will help teachers help students meet the common core state standards.
Views: 352330 Smartatmath
The McCammon Teaching Method | #Paperslide
 
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http://lodgemccammon.com The McCammon Method of teaching uses three simple and powerful research-based instructional strategies. First, all of my lectures are recorded and published, creating a self-paced learning resource for my students. They can watch my 1-take lecture videos anywhere, any time and as many times as they need in order to process the information. According to research, self-paced learning environments can increase student achievement. We also know that these video lectures can be 60-80% shorter than live lectures that cover the same information. My videos free up a significant amount of class time that I can use to challenge students to be active in their learning. Second, throughout every lesson, I challenge my students to work in groups to re-teach the content. This is the best way for me to know if they learned what I wanted them to learn - I ask them to teach it back to me. We know from research that collaboration and peer teaching can drastically increase retention of the information. And third, I take every opportunity throughout each lesson to get students out of their seats, up and moving. Movement increases blood flow to the brain and can promote attention, memory, and creative thinking. So, this is how these three strategies can work together in a classroom to create an extremely efficient and active learning environment. Today’s economics lesson is about demand. This lesson used to take me around 60 minutes to lecture live in the classroom because of interruptions, tangents and repetition. My 1-take video lecture covering the same information is 15 minutes long. My 30 students come into the room and take their seats. After welcoming them, I have the students get into groups of three. Once they have their groups, I ask them to stand up and move to a whiteboard station (before the students arrived I pinned up 10 whiteboards around the room, on the walls). Once the students are standing at their stations, I explain the simple assignment. I say, “I am going to play the first three minutes of my video lecture about demand and then I am going to press pause. When the three-minute segment is over, I want you to collaborate with your group to reteach it, in your own words, using your whiteboard to illustrate. I want you to teach the segment back to me but your version has to be 20 seconds or less, so you have to be concise.” When the students are ready, I play the first three minutes of the video and then give them another three minutes to prepare their lesson. Then, I have each group teach their new 20-second lesson to another group. While this re teaching is going on, I listen and watch in order to find out which group did the best job. When I have identified the best version, I select one member from that group to teach their 20-second lesson again while I record it using my cell phone video camera (in 1-take). We do the same process four more times to get through my entire 15-minute video about demand. Once my lecture video is complete, I have the students sit down and we watch and discuss the five 20-second, student videos that I recorded throughout the activity. After playing each video, I have the student who was featured do a quick reflection, sharing what they liked about their presentation as well as what could be improved. Of course, my 15-minute video lecture is available online for students to revisit anywhere and anytime. But now, in addition, I also publish the five student-created videos so those can be accessed as well, creating a completely transparent teaching and learning environment. This lesson takes about 60 minutes. So, instead of lecturing live for 60 minutes while the students sit passively, I chose to move through the content efficiently and actively. Throughout my 60-minute lesson students are constantly challenged to teach the information and are up and moving most of the time. The McCammon Method, the combination of these efficient and active learning strategies, can be used by any teacher, every day to encourage students to strengthen their active listening, collaboration, critical thinking, creative thinking and communication skills.
Fishbowl #14
 
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Please view my TEDx talk at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQcc1AiaFL0 This video is a full-length example of how to effectively use the Active Learning Strategy entitled: Fishbowl. www.teachingrocks.com Hello friends, my name is Troy Wittmann, and I want to help teachers engage their students in the learning process. After two decades of teaching, I have discovered one absolute truth: our students want to be active participants in the learning process. Fortunately, the days of "chalk and talk" or the teacher being the lone "sage on the stage" are becoming less prevalent. Today students want and deserve more. An old Native American expression captures this sentiment perfectly: "Tell me and I will forget. Show me and I may not remember. Involve me and I will understand." I have written a book and completed a video series on Active Learning. The book is entitled: 33⅓ Active Learning Strategies. It comes with a companion set of eight DVD's and one futuristic, musical CD. The DVD's contain 33⅓ separate HD videos with an average runtime of 15 minutes. The Active Learning Strategies explained in the book and on the DVD's can be used from elementary through high school and even for adult learners. All you need to do is adjust the questions and statements to meet your goals and objectives. Of course, these strategies may also be used to address local, state, and Common Core Standards. One specific method of engaging our students that my faith has inspired me with is known simply as the Teachingrocks Time Machine™. I can't wait to show you how it all works. Thank you, Troy Wittmann Teacher www.teachingrocks.com
Views: 32233 Troy Wittmann
Cooperative Learning Model: Strategies & Examples
 
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The cooperative learning model is designed to help classroom teachers get a better understanding of this learning strategy. Cooperative learning is an essential part of K-12 education. All students will experience cooperative learning at some part in the school career. This video begins by offering some reasons as to why cooperative learning should be used in schools by teachers for students. The video continues by describing several different ways teachers can group students for this learning environment. Groupings can be by performance level, heterogenous, homogenous, random, and more. Then the video gives several different examples of cooperative learning. Those examples include think pair share, project based learning, and jigsaw. There are also some criticisms and cautions that teachers should beware of when creating this learning environment. This video is part of a playlist containing the various learning models supported by Google Certified Educator Level 1 Fundamentals Training. It is also part of the channel Teachings in Education designed to help provide professional develop and training workshops for teachers interested in expanding their knowledge in education.
Views: 30909 Teachings in Education
A Documentary on the Process of Active Learning
 
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A word on the purpose, design, and structure of the film: This film is intended to introduce faculty to (or help them develop their knowledge of) various theories, ideas, and strategies for teaching in a way that facilitates ‘active learning’. The latter term has become a catch-phrase in current educational discourse. The plenitude of perspectives, ideas, and strategies that can fit under such a phrase as ‘active learning’ have rendered it, in our opinion, quite nebulous; a catch-all phrase that can mean many things at once. In consequence, we invite the viewers to ponder the following set of questions in an attempt to unpack this concept and to reach some general underpinning principles that can help them in the design, appraisal and implementation of learning experiences that may be considered ‘meaningful’ for both teacher and student: What is the difference between students experiencing learning through ‘traditional’, ‘didactic’, ‘transmission-model’ approaches and those experiencing ‘active learning’? Aren’t students in all cases somewhat ‘active’ in their learning? One may argue that transmission models are also forms of active learning: when students listen to a lecture or attempt to memorize information, their minds are active in appropriating the information. On the other hand, if we were to design instruction around highly interactive, ‘fun’ activities with the least structure possible, allowing students the full freedom to explore and experience their environments, would this then qualify as a form of ‘active’ or ‘meaningful’ learning? What if the experiences that the students ‘accumulate’ in such situations remain disorganized and disjointed? The above two questions/scenarios tap into a broader question about teaching and learning: Must all learning be learning by doing? And if so, what does ‘doing’ involve? Is ‘doing’ equivalent to situated, hands-on activity? Can doing be non-situated? The making of this film was guided by the above questions and dilemmas. These questions and the ideas they evoked in the team that made this film were embedded into the content, structure and aesthetics of this film. As a ‘documentary’, this film was designed containing several deliberate signals, images, and prompts for the interacting viewer. Some of them were implicitly (or subliminally if you may) embedded into the footage while others were explicitly stated or expressed. Some were intended as provocations of thoughts, ideas, or personal experiences while others were intended to provide more explicit content. This film hopes to operate as both ‘tool’ and ‘result’; a tool for inquiry into the meaning of teaching and learning as well as the result of this inquiry (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 65). In an attempt to make this film an interactive experience for the viewers and to engage them actively and meaningfully in considering the above as well as other emergent questions, the makers of this film adopted the following strategies: We embedded several ‘provocations’ and ‘prompts’ into the content, structure and style of the film. We invite the viewers to remain attentive to what might seem as random, fleeting and inconsequential objects, gestures and signs that were deliberately inserted into the film. We used various visual devices to evoke thinking on various levels (ex. meta-cognitively). Some of them might appear uncanny or even surreal. As such, a certain playful mindset is recommended. These provocations spanned objects, contexts, gestures, metaphorical images, camera perspectives, as well as other visual, aesthetic and verbal devices; their presence as well as their absence were often deliberate and intended to provoke questions and ideas about teaching and learning. A gentle caveat: the film ends in a circular dialogue (why?) which is relatively lengthy yet somewhat playful in its attempt to delay or resist premature closure. Everything prior to this dialogue is not in any way intended to instruct. Rather, the process and buildup to this dialogue hopes to provoke questions, hesitations, concerns as well as insights. In summary, this film attempts to stay loyal to the rawness of the process of teaching and learning and therefore its creators resisted sanitizing it from the inevitable crudities that accompany this process. We hope that such crudities can function as provocations for a deeper thinking about the meaning of teaching. References: Bruner, J. (1999). The Process of Education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education. New York, NY: Kappa Delta Pi. Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. [email protected]
Views: 1212 Mahmoud Natout