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Active Teaching and Learning  Strategies
 
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A 40 minute workshop using a list of 228 active learning approaches by Dr. Jace Hargis in July 2016.
Views: 27106 Jace Hargis
Steps on How to Teach in an Active Learning Classroom  - Steelcase Education
 
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Active learning classrooms require different planning and teaching strategies than traditional classrooms. Steelcase Education offers a few basic steps to get started.
Views: 103115 Steelcase
5. Teaching Methodologies, Part II: Active Learning: Why and How
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin This class explores the value and impact of active learning techniques in the classroom. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 14729 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Strategies
 
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Here are 9 active learning methods that all teachers would find exciting to be used in classrooms. This will help in creating student-centered classrooms instead of teacher-centered ones.
Views: 5504 Nour Chahine
What is Active Learning?
 
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Discusses what active learning is and provides examples of how active learning can be used in both face to face and online classes.
Views: 275194 NWIACOMMCOLLEGE
Active Learning
 
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References: (1) Bonwell, C.C., and J. A. Eison. (1991) Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom, ASHEERIC Higher Education Report No. 1, George Washington University, Washington, DC. (2) Renkl, A., Atkinson, R. K., Maier, U. H., & Staley, R. (2002) From example study to problem solving: Smooth transitions help learning. Journal of Experimental Education, 70 (4), 293–315. (3) Barnes, D. (1989) Active Learning. Leeds University TVEI Support Project. p. 19. (4) Kyriacou, C. (1992) Active Learning in Secondary School Mathematics. British Educational Research Journal. 18 (3): 309–318. (5) Grabinger R.S. and Dunlap J.C. (1995) Rich environments for active learning: A definition. Association for Learning Technology Journal, 3(2):5–34. (6) Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, R. T.; Smith, K. A. (1998) Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom, (2nd ed.); Interaction Book: Edina, MN. (7) Felder, R. M., & Brent, R. (2007) Cooperative learning. In P. A. Mabrouk, ed.. Active learning: Models from the analytical sciences. ACS Symposium Series, 970: 34-53. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society. (8) Hung, W., Jonassen, D. H., & Liu, R. (2008). Problem-based learning. Handbook of research on educational communications and technology, 3, 485-506. (9) Herreid, C. F., & Schiller, N. A. (2013). Case studies and the flipped classroom. Journal of College Science Teaching, 42(5), 62-66.
Views: 14368 Monika Siepsiak
The Jigsaw Method
 
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This cooperative learning strategy increases student engagement, encourages collaboration, and results in better learning. Learn how to use the basic Jigsaw method, another variation called Jigsaw II, and get tips for troubleshooting, like what to do if you can't divide students evenly.
Views: 229059 Cult of Pedagogy
Active Learning Strategies
 
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Views: 8641 Katie Rice
Active Learning Strategies
 
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Here are some active learning strategies to improve your essay exam performance. Brought to you by Learn Law Better https://learnlawbetter.com Newsletter Sign-Up: http://eepurl.com/cBOaBv Blog: https://learnlawbetter.com/blog Learn Law Better is helping law students get better grades and prepare for the bar exam.
Views: 1702 Learn Law Better
Creative and active teaching and learning: Dr. John Zubizarreta at TEDxColumbiaSC
 
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Professor of English and director of Honors and Faculty Development at Columbia College. In 2010, he was named U.S. Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation.
Views: 219966 TEDx Talks
Active Learning Strategies | Passion For Learning
 
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Studies show that exam results improve by 6% using Active Learning Strategies as opposed to more traditional approaches to learning. In this episode I share 5 simple yet effective steps to consider to boost mental and physical engagement for enhanced learning outcomes.
Views: 45 Jazz Rose
Active Learning Strategies
 
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This module is a part Iowa State University's CELT Teaching Symposium for the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT): http://www.celt.iastate.edu
Views: 1765 isucelt
Active Learning Strategies Part 1
 
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Dr. Shelley Howell, UTSA Teaching and Learning Consultant, presents 5 active learning strategies you can use in your classroom today.
Teaching Methods for Inspiring the Students of the Future | Joe Ruhl | TEDxLafayette
 
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Collaboration. Communication. Critical thinking. Creativity. - Should be present in all classrooms. Joe Ruhl received his bachelors and masters degrees at Purdue University and he has been sharing the joys of biology with kids for 37 years. He presently teaches Biology, Genetics, and Science Research courses at Jefferson High School in Lafayette, Indiana. Joe and his wife Gail have two children and two grandchildren. The National Association of Biology Teachers named Joe Ruhl the Outstanding Biology Teacher of Indiana in 1987. In 1988 he was awarded a Golden Apple Teaching Award by the Lafayette, Indiana Chamber of Commerce. In 1989 he was honored at the White House as Indiana’s recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching. In 1996 he received the Purdue University College of Science Distinguished Alumnus Award for Excellence in K-12 Science Teaching. In 2004 he was awarded the Purdue College of Education’s Crystal Apple Teaching Award. And in 2012 he was honored with the Shell National Science Teaching Award. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 1357688 TEDx Talks
Active Learning Strategies | Passion For Learning
 
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Passion for Learning Series 1 episode 3. Studies show that exam results improve by 6% using Active Learning Strategies as opposed to more traditional approaches to learning. In this episode I share 5 simple yet effective steps to consider to boost mental and physical engagement for enhanced learning outcomes. www.jandceducation.com
Views: 673 J and C Education
Active Learning Strategy: Jigsaw
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes the jigsaw active learning strategy. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2500 MIT OpenCourseWare
Aflatoun Active Learning Methods: The Jigsaw Method
 
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This is one of a series of instructional animation made for The Aflatoun Educational Platform project in cooperation with and support of Orange Foundation. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/W305/
Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom
 
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Active Learning and Flipped Classrooms are popular approaches in higher education pedagogy. This seminar provides examples of successful active learning activities from HORT 1001 Plant Propagation and explores ideas to help you make use of an Active Learning Classroom to enrich student learning in your class. Presentation slides available at http://z.umn.edu/activelearninghort. Handouts available at http://z.umn.edu/activelearninghortho,
5 Classroom Engagement Strategies To Create Active Learners
 
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Students today are constantly stimulated, which can make our job as educators more difficult. These 5 strategies can be implemented into any content area with little to no preparation. Tune in to learn about the strategies and download the free templates at www.dailylessonplan.com/engagement
Views: 11053 Emily Du Plessis
Active Learning Strategy: Mud Cards
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes how she uses mud cards as an active learning strategy. She also offers advice to educators who are considering using this strategy in their own classrooms. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1977 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Strategy: Think-Pair-Share
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes the think-pair-share active learning strategy. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2764 MIT OpenCourseWare
What is ACTIVE LEARNING? What does ACTIVE LEARNING mean? ACTIVE LEARNING meaning & explanation
 
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What is ACTIVE LEARNING? What does ACTIVE LEARNING mean? ACTIVE LEARNING meaning - ACTIVE LEARNING definition - ACTIVE LEARNING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Active learning is a teaching method that strives to more directly involve students in the learning process. The term active learning "was introduced by the English scholar R W Revans (1907–2003)." Bonwell (1991) "states that in active learning, students participate in the process and students participate when they are doing something besides passively listening." (Weltman, p. 7) Active learning is "a method of learning in which students are actively or experientially involved in the learning process and where there are different levels of active learning, depending on student involvement." (Weltman, p. 8) It is a model of instruction that focuses the responsibility of learning on learners. It was popularized in the 1990s by its appearance on the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) report (Bonwell & Eison 1991). In this report they discuss a variety of methodologies for promoting "active learning". They cite literature that indicates that to learn, students must do more than just listen: They must read, write, discuss, or be engaged in solving problems. It relates to the three learning domains referred to as knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA), and that this taxonomy of learning behaviours can be thought of as "the goals of the learning process" (Bloom, 1956). In particular, students must engage in such higher-order thinking tasks as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Active learning engages students in two aspects – doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell and Eison, 1991). There are diverse range of alternatives for the term "active learning" like learning through play, technology based learning, activity based learning, group work, project method, etc. the underlying factor behind these are some significant qualities and characteristics of active learning. Active learning is the opposite of passive learning; it is learner-centered, not teacher-centered, and requires more than just listening; active participation of each and every student is a necessary aspect in active learning. Students must be doing things and simultaneously think about the work done and the purpose behind it so that they can enhance their higher order thinking capabilities. Many research studies have proven that active learning as a strategy has promoted achievement levels and some others say that content mastery is possible through active learning strategies. However, some students as well as teachers find it difficult to adapt to the new learning technique. Active learning should transform students from passive listeners to active participants, helps the student understand the subject through inquiry, gathering and analyzing data to solving higher order cognitive problems. There is intensive use of scientific and quantitative literacy across the curriculum and technology based learning is also in high demand in concern with active learning. Barnes (1989) suggested principles of active learning: 1. Purposive: the relevance of the task with the students' concerns. 2. Reflective: students' reflection on the meaning of what is learnt. 3. Negotiated: negotiation of goals and methods of learning between students and teachers. 4. Critical: students appreciate different ways and means of learning the content. 5. Complex: students compare learning tasks with complexities existing in real life and making reflective analysis. 6. Situation-driven: the need of the situation is considered in order to establish learning tasks. 7. Engaged: real life tasks are reflected in the activities conducted for learning. Active learning requires appropriate learning environments through the implementation of correct strategy. Characteristics of learning environment are: 1. Aligned with constructivist strategies and evolved from traditional philosophies. 2. Promoting research based learning through investigation and contains authentic scholarly content. 3. Encouraging leadership skills of the students through self-development activities. 4. Creating atmosphere suitable for collaborative learning for building knowledgeable learning communities. 5. Cultivating a dynamic environment through interdisciplinary learning and generating high-profile activities for better learning experience. 6. Integration of prior knowledge with new ones to incur rich structure of knowledge among the students. 7. Task based performance enhancement by giving the student's a realistic practical sense of the subject matter learnt in the classroom.
Views: 4844 The Audiopedia
6 Brain-Based Learning Strategies #Paperslide | Dr. Lodge McCammon
 
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http://lodgemccammon.com Everyone watching this has a brain and all of our brains function in similar ways when it comes to learning. The following is a formula that any instructor can use every day to enhance the learning experience for their students….and this formula provides the research foundation for what I call the McCammon method of teaching. So, here are 6 practical brain-based strategies that any teacher can use tomorrow to increase retention of information while giving all learners a chance to improve their communication and collaboration skills. Brain research suggests that students should... Receive information in short segments This increases the student’s ability to focus on the content, and is great for addressing learners with limited attention spans A rule of thumb here: try to present in chunks of 2 minutes or less for grades K-3, 4 minutes or less for grades 4-8, and 6 minutes or less for grade 9 to Adult Learners Video lectures are ideal for delivering these short segments. They ensure an exact length and keep the teacher from being distracted by cognitive interruptions that happen frequently during live lecture. They also ensure that the content is consistent for all students and that the information is fully covered in every lesson. Finally, the video lectures can be extremely concise and efficient - they can be 60-80% shorter than live lectures covering the same information. Immediately use the content after each segment After each chunk of content is delivered, we can challenge students to discuss the information, putting it in their own words. They should be encouraged to connect it to their life experiences, discuss these connections with peers, and ask clarifying questions. One of the best assignments we can give students after they view each chunk is to simply ask them to teach it back to us. It’s a great way to know if they learned what we wanted them to learn Review the content multiple times throughout each lesson Repetition solidifies the information in the brain Students receive the content by way of these short video chunks, which they can review again at a later time, and as many times as needed. This creates a self-paced learning resource. The students also repurpose and review the content after each video chunk when they collaborate, discuss and teach it back Switch tasks early & often This will constantly refocus student attention and increase engagement Here is one way to think about doing this. Play a 5-minute video segment Then give the students 5 minutes to collaborate and reteach the segment Spend 5 minutes recording a few exemplar student lessons And take another 5 minutes to watch and discuss the student video presentations Spending 20 minutes on this active learning experience can be much more impactful than simply lecturing on the same information for 20 minutes, while students are passive. Develop an emotional connection with the content A best practice here is to get students to create something showcasing their ideas, fingerprints, and voice so they own each segment. One of the best and most efficient assignments is to again have students teach-back the content, having them create and record their version of every lesson. A very powerful strategy for getting students to make an emotional connection to the content is to have them sit in front of a camera and be the teacher...and then afterwards watch their performance on screen. They will experience excitement and cognitive dissonance. This form of reflective practice can be an extremely emotional experience for any learner. And that emotion is tied directly to the content. Finally...Get up and move as much as possible Standing and moving around any classroom promotes blood flow to the brain Movement can increase memory, creativity, attention, and achievement Here’s a best practice: while the collaboration, discussion and teach-back assignments are going on, students can be put in groups that are required move around the classroom using whiteboards on the walls to prepare and present their lessons. Just remember, having students of any age sit for long periods of time is not optimal for their learning. So, if tomorrow’s lesson plan is that you are going to tell students a bunch of information and hope or expect them to remember...use these strategies instead. Students will retain more of the information and it will give them a chance to improve their communication and collaboration skills.
Active Learning Strategies for the Classroom and the Future of NCLEX-RN
 
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Studies confirm that active learning promotes clinical judgment through a deeper understanding of the material and upcoming changes to the NCLEX-RN exam will demand more classroom and clinical focus on the ability for observation and analysis. Nurse educator and education consultant Brent Thompson, PhD, RN dives into the theory and practice of active learning integration within nursing curriculum and how it will help your students succeed. Brent will discuss the changing NCLEX-RN standards, proven techniques he has used, and how technology can play a key role. For more information, contact us: https://bit.ly/2An1kGA About Brent Thompson A pediatric nurse since 1980, Brent Thompson earned an MSN in nursing of children and a Ph.D. in Nursing Education. Dr. Thompson is a consultant and an advocate for the use of technology to assist nurse educators in active learning strategies in the classroom.
Views: 282 Unbound Medicine
Active Learning: 3 Easy Ways for Higher Education Lectures
 
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This recording walks faculty in health professions education through 3 evidence-supported approaches to active learning. The goal is to help you learn the method and strategies for success of 3 active learning methods that should be relatively easy to incorporate into your teaching practice.
Student Engagement & Motivation Strategies & Tips.wmv
 
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This video will help teachers with classroom management to provide an effective learning environment by creating a culture of engagement and motivation for their middle school students. Administrators can also use this video to provide staff development to their teachers and staff helping them with classroom management and engagement. This video emphasizes engagement, motivation, building relationships, and Checking for Understanding (CFU). This is part two which is more about engagement and motivation to provide opportunity for student and teacher success. Learning cannot happen without a safe, secure, and comfortable learning environment for students that provides engagement and makes students feel valued. All stakeholders; administrators, teachers, and students will benefit from the tips and strategies illustrated in this video. These tips are based on twenty years of experience as a teacher and principal with middle school students, especially students of color, poverty, and English language learners (ELL). The author/ creator of this video has been influenced by other experts in the field; Michael Grinder, Harry Wong, Ruby Payne, and Robert Marzano all of which have great ideas to help teachers provide effective and engaging classrooms. Helpful hints are listed to get the teacher started from the very first day of class. Not only can middle school teachers use these tips and strategies, but 4th grade, 5th grade, 6th grade, 7th grade, 8th grade, and 9th grade teachers can find valuable information in these videos and the accompanying webpage. Test scores and learning in general will improve with effective and engaging classroom management. Building relationships, communicating expectations, and accountability will provide the keys to reaching students to teach them effectively. These strategies will help teachers help students meet the common core state standards.
Views: 387936 Smartatmath
Classroom Strategies for Active Learning
 
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This presentation is a part of the Classroom Strategies for Active Learning session for the CBC Professional Development day in Alice (10-24-14). It outlines my experiences with active learning in the classroom.
Views: 5801 Katy Gifford
Active Learning Strategy: Personal Response Systems
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes several different personal response systems and shares advice with educators who are considering using them in their classrooms. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1440 MIT OpenCourseWare
Applying Active Learning Strategies in class_ Mr. Ahmed Sayed
 
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Applying Active Learning Strategies in class. Presented by Mr. Ahmed Sayed Mohammed Saad. Abdel_Rahman Fakieh Model Schools in Mekkah. Saudi Arabia Applying few active learning Strategies in one class. Think_Pair_Share Four_Corners Jigsaw Mingling
Views: 2000 Ahmed Saad
Fishbowl #14
 
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Please view my TEDx talk at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQcc1AiaFL0 This video is a full-length example of how to effectively use the Active Learning Strategy entitled: Fishbowl. www.teachingrocks.com Hello friends, my name is Troy Wittmann, and I want to help teachers engage their students in the learning process. After two decades of teaching, I have discovered one absolute truth: our students want to be active participants in the learning process. Fortunately, the days of "chalk and talk" or the teacher being the lone "sage on the stage" are becoming less prevalent. Today students want and deserve more. An old Native American expression captures this sentiment perfectly: "Tell me and I will forget. Show me and I may not remember. Involve me and I will understand." I have written a book and completed a video series on Active Learning. The book is entitled: 33⅓ Active Learning Strategies. It comes with a companion set of eight DVD's and one futuristic, musical CD. The DVD's contain 33⅓ separate HD videos with an average runtime of 15 minutes. The Active Learning Strategies explained in the book and on the DVD's can be used from elementary through high school and even for adult learners. All you need to do is adjust the questions and statements to meet your goals and objectives. Of course, these strategies may also be used to address local, state, and Common Core Standards. One specific method of engaging our students that my faith has inspired me with is known simply as the Teachingrocks Time Machine™. I can't wait to show you how it all works. Thank you, Troy Wittmann Teacher www.teachingrocks.com
Views: 38067 Troy Wittmann
Effective Active Learning Techniques
 
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Active learning is a student-centered approach in which planned activities are used to engage the student as an active participant in their learning. Techniques such as guided questioning, think-pair-share, one-minute paper, and other such exercises improve student retention of material, and can enhance the traditional lecture format. However, active learning strategies can be difficult for new teaching assistants to implement because they require preparation and skills in guiding and moderating the learning activity. This workshop examines the planning system necessary to incorporate such activities, and attendees actively participate in numerous active learning techniques applicable to a wide range of classroom settings. They also learn helpful tips on what you can do, how to do it, and why active learning in the classroom is important to student learning.
Views: 15223 UnivSouthCarolinaCTE
Active Learning Strategy: Beach Ball
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin discusses how using the beach ball strategy, in combination with meaningful questions, encourages students to actively participate in classroom discussions. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 3688 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Strategy: Debates
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes using debates to engage students in active learning and shares advice with educators using this strategy with students for the first time. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2331 MIT OpenCourseWare
Active Learning Strategies in Action
 
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A workshop presented to ELI teaching staff in May 2017
Views: 107 Walid Shawky
An Active Learning Math Class
 
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This video illustrates how active learning strategies can be effectively used in a mathematics classroom. In this class, Socratic lecturing, clicker questions, and peer discussions are used. Groups work on “challenge questions” with on-demand guidance from the circulating instructor, which is followed by an instructor-guided whole class discussion. Helpful tips about what to look for in this video along with supporting materials and references are available at http://blogs.ubc.ca/wpvc/ Additional resources on teaching and learning are available on the UBC Skylight and CWSEI pages. http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/
Views: 1239 ubcscience
Active  VS Passive Learning Instructional Methods
 
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This video looks at the difference between Passive and Active Instructional Methods and how they contribute to information retention as well as learning outcomes
Views: 4427 Betty Weber
Examples of Active Learning
 
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Three short examples of peer instruction. Shot in classrooms at Harvard, Boston University, and Colorado Boulder, these examples show peer instruction in action.
Views: 11271 CIRTL MOOC
Active Learning - Technology in the classroom
 
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We partnered with Toledo Public Schools to create a video demonstrating technology in the classroom. Starting from elementary all the way through to college.
Aflatoun Active Learning Methods: Teacher Talking Time VS Student Talking Time
 
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The biggest focus of any Aflatoun teacher-training workshop is naturally in practice teaching. Teachers are given lesson plans from the Aflatoun books and asked to present a mock lesson. The other participants then critique their performance using a set list of questions. One of the aims of those micro-teaching sessions is to help teachers use a variety of active-teaching methods, beyond simply lecturing. In this animation, we look more closely at one aspect of classroom teaching i.e. the ratio of Teacher Talking Time versus Student Talking Time. This is very often a reliable way of measuring the extent to which students are actively engaged in their own learning. We hope that you enjoy this module, that it helps refresh your memory, provides you with a fuller understanding of this aspect of active-learning and maybe even inspires you with some new ideas.
Active learning in English classes
 
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NIS Uralsk English teachers
Views: 2035 NIS Uralsk PD
How To Practice Active Learning? Effective Active Learning Techniques
 
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Active learning is a process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Active learning is a process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Cooperative learning, problem-based learning, and the use of case methods and simulations are some approaches that promote active learning. This lesson teaches you how to research summaries, articles, and other resources and be an active learner. You can watch the entire course here:- https://goo.gl/PKWY2a For more lessons/courses on Preparation, please visit:- www.unacademy.com
Views: 16196 Unacademy
Teaching and Learning Experiences in Active Learning Classrooms: Highlights
 
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Teaching and Learning Services (http://www.mcgill.ca/tls/ ) has produced a series of videos that highlight how Active Learning Classrooms (ALCs) are being used at McGill to enhance student engagement and active and collaborative learning. This video highlights how four McGill instructors in different disciplines have used the features of McGill's Active Learning Classrooms to engage students and promote active and collaborative learning.
Views: 21203 McGill University
Active Learning Strategy: Lightning Round
 
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MIT 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-95JF15 Instructor: Janet Rankin In this video, Janet Rankin describes using the lightning round strategy to help students engage with others and articulate arguments informed by multiple perspectives. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 1706 MIT OpenCourseWare
Teaching with Technology: Active Learning Strategies
 
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Active Learning Strategies for Asynchronous Online Students: An Example from CHEMENG 150 ( Biochemical Engineering) with Lisa Hwang.