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Gene expression analysis by Quantitative Real Time PCR - By using experimental example
 
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In this video I have explained that how we study relative gene expression by using quantitative Real Time PCR. To explain the concept real experimental data is used in this video. By watching this video you will learn following things - 1. Basic principle of quantitative real time PC 2. About SYBR Green and Taqman probe 3. How to study relative gene expression data by analyzing quantitative real time PCR data Please write to me in case of any question or doubt at - [email protected]
Views: 261 Logical biology
Real Time QPCR Data Analysis Tutorial
 
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In this Bio-Rad Laboratories Real Time Quantitative PCR tutorial (part 1 of 2), you will learn how to analyze your data using both absolute and relative quantitative methods. The tutorial also includes a great explanation of the differences between Livak, delta CT and the Pfaffl methods of analyzing your results. For more videos visit http://www.americanbiotechnologist.com
Views: 328713 americanbiotech
Analyzing Quantitative PCR Data
 
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Relative and absolute methods of qPCR analysis. Created for an assignment for BIOC3001: Molecular Biology at the University of Western Australia. ****SCRIPT**** [I know it's a bit fast] qPCR or quantitative real-time PCR… ….is simply classic PCR monitored using fluorescent dyes or probes. qPCR is accurate, reliable and extremely sensitive, it can even detect a SINGLE copy of a specific transcript. qPCR is commonly coupled to reverse transcription to measure gene expression. No wonder it is so important for molecular diagnostics, life sciences, agriculture, and medicine. Firstly, let's go over the NUTS and BOLTS of qPCR. For this you use a fluorescent dye which binds to the DNA. As qPCR progresses, the fluorescent signal increases. Ideally the signal should double with every cycle, which is then plotted. Because there are few template strands to start with, initially there’s a faint signal. Eventually, usually after 15 cycles, the signal rises above the background noise and can be detected. We call this the THRESHOLD CYCLE, Ct, the point from which all quantitative data analysis begins. But how do you analyse qPCR data? You can either use an absolute quantification method, with a standard curve, OR a relative method, using one or more reference genes to standardize and compare the differences in Ct values between two treatments. The absolute standard curve method determines ORIGINAL DNA concentration by comparing the Ct value of the sample of interest with a standard curve. To create the standard curve, you need to make DNA samples of different KNOWN concentrations. After doing PCR on these, you will see different PCR plots for each standard ….. and unsurprisingly they have different Ct values. The GREATER the concentration of the original DNA sample, the SMALLER the Ct value. So if you plot ORIGINAL DNA concentration against the Ct values. You will have a standard curve like this….. Now let’s say the PCR plot of your unknown DNA sample is somewhere here….. ...which corresponds to this Ct value on the standard curve here…. Using the standard curve you can figure out the log concentration of your DNA sample to be x. As this is in log scale, you can simply calculate your sample DNA concentration to be 10 to the power of x. Absolute analysis is suitable when you want to determine the ACTUAL transcript copy number, that is the level of gene expression. On the other hand, Relative quantification is used when you want to COMPARE the difference in gene expression BETWEEN two treatments, for example light or dark treated Arabadopsis thaliana. This is done using one or more reference genes, such as actin, which are expressed at the SAME level for both treatments. You then perform qPCR on both your samples and the reference genes, find out the DIFFERENCE between the two Cts values, delta Ct, in EACH treatment. Now the RATIO of the two delta Cts …[pause a bit] . tells you how much gene expression has changed. For instance, in the dark treatment, the Ct value of your reference gene is at THIS level, the Ct value of your target gene is THIS Level. So you have this delta Ct which is the difference in Cts in the first treatment. in the dark treatment, the Ct value of your reference gene is STILL at THIS level, but the Ct value of your target gene may become only this much. So the ratio of the two Ct values is.. delta Ct(dark treatment) divided by delta Ct(light treament) equals one third ….showing the delta Ct has DECREASED by a factor of 3, which means that gene expression of the target gene is GREATER in the dark treated sample. This is how relative quantification using a reference gene helps detect change in the expression of your target gene. In conclusion, there are two ways to quantify transcripts using qPCR: absolute quantification using a standard curve, and relative quantification using a reference gene. The method used depends on whether you want to determine the ACTUAL number of transcripts or the RELATIVE change in gene expression.
Views: 187244 TARDIStennant
AriaMx: Analyzing a Quantitative PCR Experiment
 
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The AriaMx Real-Time PCR System is a fully integrated quantitative PCR amplification, detection, and data analysis system. The system design combines a state-of-the-art thermal cycler, an advanced optical system with an LED excitation source, and complete data analysis software. Updated August 2016. More information at http://www.genomics.agilent.com/campaign.jsp?id=4600006&cid=G011543
Views: 9165 Agilent Technologies
Real time PCR
 
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This pcr reaction lecture explains about real time pcr procedure. It explains the realtime pcr mechanism and uses in molecular diagnosis. Web-http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), also called real-time polymerase chain reaction, is a laboratory technique of molecular biology based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. For one or more specific sequences in a DNA sample, quantitative PCR enables both detection and quantification. The quantity can be either an absolute number of copies or a relative amount when normalized to DNA input or additional normalizing genes. The procedure follows the general principle of polymerase chain reaction; its key feature is that the amplified DNA is detected as the reaction progresses in "real time". This is a new approach compared to standard PCR, where the product of the reaction is detected at its end. Two common methods for the detection of products in quantitative PCR are: (1) non-specific fluorescent dyes that intercalate with any double-stranded DNA, and (2) sequence-specific DNA probes consisting of oligonucleotides that are labelled with a fluorescent reporter which permits detection only after hybridization of the probe with its complementary sequence to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and non-coding RNA in cells or tissues. qPCR is the abbreviation used for quantitative PCR (real-time PCR).[1] Real-time reverse-transcription PCR is often denoted as: qRT-PCR[2][3][4] The acronym "RT-PCR" commonly denotes reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and not real-time PCR, but not all authors adhere to this convention. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 216124 Shomu's Biology
The principle of Real Time PCR, Reverse Transcription, quantitative rt-PCR
 
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This video is an easy and full explanation about the principle of real time PCR. For better understanding watch the previous video about the principle of PCR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kx5qMjh-izA
rtPCR animation
 
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RT PCR animation - This lecture explains about the RT PCR also known as the real time PCR. Realtime PCR is a technique of amplifying DNA fragments with polymerase chain reaction and along with the PCR. it can help us to monitor the concentration of amplified DNA Replication in real time with the help of fluorescence emission. Real time PCR or RT PCR uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer or Fret to detect the fluorescence generated from the DNA amplification. Animation source is - Sumanas Inc. www.sumanasinc.com For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the tutorial on RT PCR animation.
Views: 142049 Shomu's Biology
Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR)
 
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Lecture on quantitative real time pcr or qpcr to understand gene amplification in realtime. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), also called real-time polymerase chain reaction, is a laboratory technique of molecular biology based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. For one or more specific sequences in a DNA sample, quantitative PCR enables both detection and quantification. The quantity can be either an absolute number of copies or a relative amount when normalized to DNA input or additional normalizing genes. The procedure follows the general principle of polymerase chain reaction; its key feature is that the amplified DNA is detected as the reaction progresses in "real time". This is a new approach compared to standard PCR, where the product of the reaction is detected at its end. Two common methods for the detection of products in quantitative PCR are: (1) non-specific fluorescent dyes that intercalate with any double-stranded DNA, and (2) sequence-specific DNA probes consisting of oligonucleotides that are labelled with a fluorescent reporter which permits detection only after hybridization of the probe with its complementary sequence to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and non-coding RNA in cells or tissues. qPCR is the abbreviation used for quantitative PCR (real-time PCR).[1] Real-time reverse-transcription PCR is often denoted as: qRT-PCR[2][3][4] The acronym "RT-PCR" commonly denotes reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and not real-time PCR, but not all authors adhere to this convention. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 92010 Shomu's Biology
Melt curve analysis in qPCR experiments
 
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The video was created by students as part of an assignment in Biochemistry (BIOC3001) in the School Molecular Sciences (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) at the University of Western Australia. If you would like to use this video for teaching, please acknowledge: the 'BIOC3001 students at the University of Western Australia, School of Molecular Sciences'.
Soya Analysis: Real-time PCR Amplification & Detection
 
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Real-time PCR for soya analysis: amplification and detection with SureFood® Allergen
Views: 779 R-Biopharm AG
Soya Analysis: Real-time PCR Sample Preparation
 
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How to prepare processed samples for real-time PCR using SureFood® PREP Advanced
Views: 2377 R-Biopharm AG
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) - Multi-Lingual Captions
 
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This short animation introduces the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure. Captions are available multiple languages. This resource was developed by Yaw Adu-Sarkodie of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Cary Engleberg of the University of Michigan. It is part of a larger learning module about laboratory methods for clinical microbiology. The full learning module, editable animation, and video transcript are available at http://open.umich.edu/education/med/oernetwork/med/microbiology/clinical-microbio-lab/2009). Copyright 2009-2010, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Cary Engleberg. This is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Help us caption & translate this video: http://amara.org/v/BVm4/
Views: 575152 openmichigan
Real Time PCR Video 1 RNA Analyses and Why Real-time PCR?
 
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In this first video, the basic concept of why using real-time PCR for gene expression study is discussed. This may be an old-school method, but since this is so powerful and useful, many scientists are still using real-time PCR to do gene expression study as of today.
Views: 98 King Ming Chan
7_Quantitative PCR -- the melting curve
 
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What exactly is provided by the curve displayed at the end of my PCR run? What is "-d(RFU)/dT"? How do I obtain a melting temperature from this curve, and what does it tell me about the amplification of primer dimers?
Views: 21592 Matthias Dobbelstein
Baselines in Real-Time PCR -- Ask TaqMan®: Ep. 5
 
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Submit your Real-Time PCR questions and watch the rest of our videos at http://ow.ly/bQh0l. Life Technologies Sr. Field Application Specialist Doug Rains helps with the understanding of baselines in Real-Time PCR. We're looking at a fairly standard real-time amplification plot. We have some nice curves, each of which has the familiar geometric phase, linear phase, and plateau phase. So far, so good. But what's all this . . . junk in the early cycles? Well, friends, if you said "junk," you were right. That's right, I said it -- junk, trash, waste, detritus, garbage, otherwise known as noise. It's the stuff we see before our actual signal from amplification gets high enough to overcome that noise. And, as the rather impolite adjectives I used a second ago would suggest, it's completely useless to us. This noise does have an effect on our curves. Our job is to minimize that effect by effectively subtracting out the noise. We do that by establishing what's known as a baseline -- a cycle-to-cycle range over which only noise can be seen, prior to the appearance of curves. Once established, the software will effectively subtract out the noise on a well-by-well basis, greatly improving the quality of our data. Let's switch the Y-axis to linear scale for a moment to illustrate the effect of baseline subtraction. Here's our data prior to baselining. Note how every sample begins from a slightly different spot on the Y-axis, causing our geometric phase data— this curvy part over here when we're in a linear scale— to look horrible. But once we subtract noise, every sample begins from the same point 0. And as a result, the data clean up nicely. The value we get after normalizing for background noise is something called delta-Rn. If you ever look closely at a log-scale amplification curve— the one we're used to seeing— you'll notice that delta-Rn is what's graphed on the Y-axis. But before you go, just note that there are two ways to set baselines in Applied Biosystems® real-time PCR software: manually, and automatically. If you do it the manual way, you set the baseline range under Analysis Settings. You either set it for a single assay, in which case all wells for that assay get the same subtraction . . . or you can go under Advanced Settings and set wells individually. Better yet, just use the default setting of Auto Baselining. With this selected, the software figures out how much noise needs to be subtracted from each well individually, and, as such, generally produces the best results. So why have a manual feature? Well, Auto does fail on occasion, especially with some SYBR® Assays and non-standard chemistries. You'll know auto has malfunctioned by the shapes of your curves. If they look more S-shaped than they should, it could be that auto has misapplied the baseline and set the End cycle too low. As a result, not enough noise is being subtracted, and the curves take on a strange shape. To fix the problem, switch over to manual mode for that assay and raise the End cycle until the curves take on a regular shape.
RT-PCR for Gene Expression
 
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RT-PCR for Gene Expression
Views: 36312 Matthew Bremgartner
Finding Multiple Melt-Curve Peaks When Using SYBR® Green in Real-Time PCR  -- Ask TaqMan®: Ep. 8
 
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Submit your Real-Time PCR questions and watch the rest of our videos at http://ow.ly/bQh0l. Life Technologies Sr. Field Application Specialist Doug Rains helps with the understanding the causes of multiple peaks in a melt curve when using SYBR® Green dye in Real-Time PCR. SYBR® Green I chemistry is a free-floating dye. Here's how it works. When SYBR® Green dye is just swimming around in the tube, it doesn't give off much fluorescence -- even when we zap it with the light source on a real-time PCR machine. But SYBR® Green dye really likes to bind to double-stranded DNA. And, when it does, and you hit it with light, the dye gets excited and fluoresces. In theory, the basic idea, then, is this: as PCR creates more and more product, the signal of SYBR® Green dye should go up proportionally. In practice, this doesn't always happen. That's because SYBR® Green dye binds to any double-stranded DNA. Meaning, every double-stranded molecule in the tube will bind SYBR® Green dye and add to the fluorescent signal. Because of this concern, users run melt curves after each experiment. They do this by slowly raising the block temperature from about 60 degrees Celsius up to 95 degrees Celsius and monitoring fluorescence. As you can see, signal drops slowly until at some point, it drops off suddenly to zero. Halfway down this drop-off is the presumed melting temperature of the product created during PCR. If you have the software do a little calculus for you, you get what's called the derivative view, which I find a little more helpful, since the drop-off gets converted into a peak. What you're hoping to see is one, clearly defined peak, which suggests— doesn't prove, mind you— but suggests that you got clean amplification of a single product. One thing you don't want to see is multiple peaks, as this suggests your amplification curves are a composite of more than one product. So what causes extraneous peaks? It really depends. It could be non-specific amplification or primer-dimer formation. In the first case, you'll need to redesign your primers to a more specific sequence. In the latter case, you may just need to lower the concentration of primer to discourage dimer formation, although a primer redesign may ultimately be necessary. The problem is, it's difficult to know exactly what's causing certain anomalies, so some users end up spending a lot of time repeating failed experiments under multiple new conditions or with multiple new primer sets. That's neither fun nor affordable. Still, SYBR® chemistry is perfectly valid for qPCR when all things go well. Users just need to take more care than users of TaqMan® chemistry do in designing their experiments, and take additional quality control steps when evaluating their data.
Using Standard Curve to Estimate DNA Quantity - Forensic Focus #4
 
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Submit your questions at http://www.thermofisher.com/forensicfocus Everyone wants to know how much DNA is in their extract, but then they ask: how can I tell if my estimate is accurate? The standard curve holds the answers. A standard curve is a tool that allows us to estimate the DNA concentration of unknown samples by comparing them to standards with known DNA concentrations. In this example, the standards consist of a 10-fold dilution series ranging from 50 ng/ul down to 5 pg/ul. During each PCR cycle, the amount of fluorescent signal for each standard in the dilution seies is measured. When the fluorescent signal crosses the detection threshold the cycle number is recorded as a Ct value, or threshold cycle value. The Ct value is what ultimately is used to create the standard curve. The Ct values are inversely proportional to the concentration of DNA in the standards. The high-concentration, 50 ng/ul standard will cross the detection threshold first, generating a “low” Ct. The low-concentration, 5 pg/ul standard will take many more cycles to cross the same threshold - and therefore the Ct will be higher. The Ct values for each dilution of the standard curve are plotted on a graph, and the software generates a regression line that fits the data. Because the standards are 10-fold dilutions, we expect the change in Ct from one standard to the next to be uniform. An uneven distribution of Ct values might indicate that the dilution series was not accurately pipetted. Let’s take a look at the standard curve for a specific DNA target, the small autosomal target. The X axis is the log of the known standard concentrations. The Y axis is the Ct value of each standard. Now, Do you see the quality metrics at the bottom of the screen? Let’s review Slope, Y intercept, and R2.? The slope measures the efficiency of the PCR reaction. In a perfect world, a slope of -3.3 indicates that the PCR reaction is 100% efficient; the target DNA is doubled each cycle. Two copies become four; four become eight; and so on. The Y intercept is the expected Ct value for a 1ng/ul sample. The R2 value measures how well the regression line fits the data points. A line that fits the data points perfectly has an R2 of 1. If your data points are scattered, the R2 value for the line will be lower. The Ct values of your standards affect the slope, the Y intercept, and the R2 value. It is very important to prepare the standard dilution series carefully to ensure consistent and accurate results! Running the standards in duplicate can help ensure you have a high quality standard curve. Once your standard curve passes the metrics test, it can be used to evaluate an unknown sample! The Ct value of the unknown sample is measured, and compared to the standard curve to estimate the DNA concentration of the unknown sample. Couldn’t be simpler! That’s it for today. If you have other questions, just click on the link below. And don’t forget- when in doubt, refer Back to the Bases!
Real Time PCR Video 4 How to choose and validate your house-keeping (reference) gene?
 
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In the fourth video of real-time PCR, we look at how we choose the reference gene to do relative gene expression analysis with the control or house keeping gene for your study. You have to validate your reference gene or control gene to make the real-time PCR data become reliable.
Views: 455 King Ming Chan
Real Time QPCR Data Analysis Tutorial (part 2)
 
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In this Bio-Rad Laboratories Real Time Quantitative PCR tutorial (part 2 of 2), you will learn how to analyze your data using both absolute and relative quantitative methods. The tutorial also includes a great explanation of the differences between Livak, delta CT and the Pfaffl methods of analyzing your results. For more videos visit http://www.americanbiotechnologist.com
Views: 162784 americanbiotech
Real-time PCR
 
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This video belongs to the section entitled "Molecular tests" that is part of the DVD "Avian Influenza sampling procedures and laboratory testing" funded by FAO and the Istituto Zooprofilattico delle Venezie (IZSVe). (c) FAO www.fao.org
Real time PCR
 
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Views: 57213 Emilija Miltenytė
Real-time PCR
 
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( http://www.abnova.com ) - Real-time PCR, also called quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR/qPCR), is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. It enables both detection and quantification (as absolute number of copies or relative amount when normalized to DNA input or additional normalizing genes) of one or more specific sequences in a DNA sample. More videos at Abnova http://www.abnova.com
Views: 234147 Abnova
How To Perform The Delta-Delta Ct Method (In Excel)
 
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In this video tutorial, I will show you how to perform the delta-delta Ct method by using Microsoft Excel. The delta-delta Ct method is a simple formula used in order to calculate the relative fold gene expression of samples when performing real-time polymerase chain reaction (also known as qPCR). THE ONLINE GUIDE http://toptipbio.com/delta-delta-ct-pcr/ MASTERING QPCR - THE ONLINE COURSE https://bit.ly/2CIVBMq VIDEO BREAKDOWN Step 1: Average the Ct values (00:53) Step 2: Calculate delta Ct (01:59) Step 3: Calculate the average delta Ct for controls (02:46) Step 4: Calculate delta-delta Ct (03:39) Step 5: Calculate 2^-(delta-delta Ct) (04:54) MORE HELPFUL HINTS & TIPS http://toptipbio.com/ FOLLOW US Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopTipBio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TopTipBio LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/top-tip-bio/
Views: 20742 Top Tip Bio
Real Time PCR - Interpretation of the amplification plot - part 2 HD
 
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This tutorial will discuss the basics of how to interpret an amplification plot of real time PCR. introduction Real Time PCR: http://youtu.be/EaGH1eKfvC0
Views: 41401 MrSimpleScience
How to Analyze Real-time PCR Data -- Ask TaqMan® Ep. 16 by Life Technologies
 
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Submit your real-time PCR questions at http://www.lifetechnologies.com/asktaqman In this video, Sr. Field Applications Specialist Doug Rains covers the various options that researchers have for performing final qPCR data calculations. Learn how to take advantage of Life Technologies' offerings of free external data analysis software, including DataAssist and ExpressionSuite. Welcome to AskTaqMan, where we answer your questions about real-time PCR. Here's an important question from Janaína at UFRGS in Brazil. She asks, "How do I analyze my Real-Time PCR data?" Well, there are in fact several options for analyzing data and generating final reports, depending on the particular application one is running. Let's address the most common qPCR experiment type: namely, gene expression. The first option is to have the instrument software perform calculations for you. In all of our most recent software versions, you have the option to set up new gene expression experiments by designating either comparative Ct or relative standard curve as your quantification method. You'll need to create at least 2 assay names -- one normalizer and one target -- and at least 2 sample names. You'll then assign these sample and assay names to the appropriate wells, making certain to identically label any wells representing pipetting replicates. If you're running the relative standard curve method, be sure to also label wells containing your dilution curve as standards, and to add standard amounts. There's a handy shortcut key that really helps set these up, by the way. Finally, tell the software which target on the plate is your normalizer gene and which sample you want to choose as the reference sample. - Most people choose the "untreated" sample, by the way. At the end of the run, simply go to either the Results or the Analysis tab, depending on your version, and to gene expression. If you labelled everything correctly, final fold change data will be generated for you at the end of the run and presented both in graphical and in tabular form. In the case of the latter, there's a column labelled RQ, or relative quantification, which is exactly the same as fold change. The instrument software has so many features for looking at your gene expression data that we just won't be able to go into too much detail in this video. So I suggest having a look at a copy of the Relative Quantification Getting Started Guide. It's available as a hard copy, as well as electronically online. And if you click on your software's Help menu, you'll even find a version right at your fingertips. But what about other options? In fact, Life Technologies offers two other exceptional tools for calculating gene expression data. Both are fre-standing packages that can be downloaded and used at no charge from the Life Technoligies website. Both DataAssist and Expression Suite offer intuitive workspaces and plenty of data crunching capabilities. Both can do multi-plate studies, calculate biological replicate fold change data, and present results in a variety of forms, including heat maps, volcano and scatter plots, and more. If you'd like to learn more about either of these packages, there are free video tutorials available on the web. Just go to learn.lifetechnologies.com, click on Gene Expression, and twirl down to the section on Web-Based training.
What is Real Time PCR?
 
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Learn more about Real Time PCR in this video clip. For the full webinar please visit: http://bitesizebio.com/webinar/28767/qpcr-tips-workflow-applications-and-troubleshooting/
Views: 3077 Bitesize Bio
qPCR technique animation tutorial
 
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Quantitative PCR (qPCR) animation tutorial - This animated lecture explains about the step by step process of quantitative realtime PCR or qPCR technique. Quantitative realtime PCR help us monitoring the amplification of target DNA in the PCR mix with time in realtime by generating fluorescence light which is detected by the fluorescent detector attached to the PCR machine. qPCR is the process of understanding the amplification of DNA content quantitatively in the PCR reaction mix. Here we explain the quantitative PCR reaction carried out with sybr green probe and Taqman probe. Animation source - www.sumanasinc.com Narrated by - Suman Bhattacharjee For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching qPCR technique animation tutorial
Views: 86093 Shomu's Biology
Overview of qPCR
 
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Learn the basics of qPCR in this short animation. For more information, visit http://www.neb.com/luna/luna-universal-qpcr-and-rt-qpcr?domainredi
Views: 39842 New England Biolabs
Automated systems for real-time PCR analysis
 
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Automated systems for real-time PCR analysis The challenge of achieving accurate and reliable quantification of DNA and RNA just got easier. QIAGEN provides the optimal solution for real-time PCR - from optimized kits and assays to fully automated PCR setup and outstanding real-time PCR analysis. Discover more at www.qiagen.com/automation.
Views: 27149 QIAGEN
Molecular Biology - RNA Isolation and Real-time PCR
 
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This video gives a brief overview of the molecular biology practical delivered to students enrolled on the MSc in Biomedical Science at NUIG, Galway, Ireland. Images of RNA isolation, assessment of RNA quantity and quality, cDNA synthesis and real-time PCR, are provided.
Views: 5883 Una FitzGerald
qRTPCR data analysis
 
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Views: 12255 profbiot
Fixing Software Setup Mistakes in Real-Time PCR (StepOnePlus™) -- Ask TaqMan®: Ep. 10
 
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Submit your Real-Time PCR questions and watch the rest of our videos at http://ow.ly/bQh0l. Life Technologies Sr. Field Application Specialist Doug Rains offers advices for fixing common software set-up mistakes when performing Real-Time PCR. I'm showing you a completed run file. Let's say I made a lot more mistakes than you did while setting up my file: wrong sample names, wrong dyes, and, yes, even forgot to label some wells. As you can see, I'm in Analysis under the Experiment Menu. To fix things, I'm going to go up here and click Setup. In the Plate Setup window, you can see my list of targets and samples. If I originally entered information incorrectly, I can change it right here. Let's say it's something as simple as a sample name. I activate the offending box, type the new name, and hit Enter. I now go to my plate map, which I access by clicking this tab, and I find that the new sample name has been added to the appropriate wells automatically. Okay, let's go back to Define Targets and Samples. Now what if I assigned the wrong fluorescent label to one of my assays? This one says FAM, but it should say VIC. That mistake left unfixed will definitely cause some analysis issues. However, I can just use the Reporter pull-down menu and make the switch. When I now go back to Analysis and click the analyze button, my change gets applied. And of course, the data improve dramatically. How is this possible? It's possible because whenever the instrument takes readings, it does so through every filter set, regardless of your dye assignment. Thus, the raw data are always there in the file. Back to Setup, where we'll deal with the issue of missing well assignments. Row D is blank because somebody forgot to assign assays and samples. And so these wells yield no data. But if I simply make the assignments now like so then go back to Analysis and reanalyzed the data, curves for those wells will appear. So, what information can we change after the fact? Just about anything besides cycling conditions. That includes sample and Assay names, Tasks (such as which wells are standards), standard amounts, the passive reference dye, and plenty more. Not only that, every Life Technologies real-time PCR instrument gives you this leeway. So even if you're using an older instrument, that's okay. In fact, you can even change the experiment type on all of the newer Life Technologies platforms, So if you accidentally labeled your ddCt run as a standard curve experiment, you can change that.
Amplify Sample with The StepOnePlus™ Real Time System  (qPCR step 6)
 
03:07
The StepOnePlus™ Real-Time PCR System is a 96-well Real-Time PCR instrument perfect for both first-time and experienced users. The StepOnePlus™ Real-Time PCR System can be setup in a variety of configurations and comes ready to use, out of the box, with intuitive data analysis and instrument control software. Utilizing robust LED based 4-color optical recording, the StepOnePlus™ Real-Time PCR System is designed to deliver precise, quantitative Real-Time PCR results for a variety of genomic research applications. The other videos in this series are: Introduction to the steps of the qPCR workflow (qPCR step 1): http://youtu.be/UOhD0jwCtEg Isolate RNA with the PureLink™ RNA Mini Kit (qPCR step 2): http://youtu.be/I174cAKluoo Quantitate RNA with the Qubit® 2.0 Fluorometer (qPCR step 3): http://youtu.be/bSSlO2fqEN8 Superscript Vilo cDNA synthesis kit (qPCR step 4): http://youtu.be/GUvkYFUBFLw Fast SYBR Green vs. TaqMan® Fast Advanced Master Mix (qPCR step 5): http://youtu.be/DsKDWVLMvuc Preparing the card for the Viia™ 7 with TaqMan® Assays (qPCR step 7): http://youtu.be/Vg1AJQ1CXjo Amplify sample with the Viia™ 7 Real-Time PCR system (qPCR step 8): http://youtu.be/MSHEhqDNeak -------------- Transcript: Alright. Let's recap a typical real-time PCR or qPCR experiment in a plate. What you will require is the actual plate, the plastics and the plastic holder. The optical adhesive cover and the optical adhesive sealer. In addition for the reagents, if you're doing a Taqman experiment, you will require the Taqman fast advance master mix. TaqMan gene expression assay. Sybr experiments will require the sybr ring master mix, and, 2 primers, which I have designated, primer 1 and primer 2. P 1 and P 2. Also. When we fire your CDNA sample and finally some water. These pipe [indiscernible] are to show you that you essentially pipette the reagents into the plate. You then seal the plate. This is the final product, which we then run on the instrument and in this case the Step One Plus. And now I'm walking over to the Step One Plus. I'm going to load my plate in the instrument simply by pulling open the door. And setting the plate, The A goes up in the top as usual. And closing the door. Now I'm just going to use the touch screen function of the Step One Plus. And I already have TaqMan Fast CDNA protocol right here on the main menu. So, I am just going to choose that one and press save. OK I saved my experiment. I start the run now. Say okay. Now what's happening is, the cover is heating. And as soon as the cover has come up to the proper temperature, you will see that this wide band becomes smaller as the plate is moving up. And as it says here on the screen, the required run temperature of the heated lid is 105. We're right now at 90.5. So after a few more degrees, the run will begin. So now that the run is completed on the step 1 plus, I'm going to collect results by putting in my USB drive, and hitting the collect results button. The system is busy, it's writing the USB. Please don't remove the USB device. And you can see as the data is being written, we have the little bars coming across the screen. Now my experiment is ready. I may remove my USB storage. I hit okay. My data is on here. I'm going to go take it to my computer at my desk and analyze my results. For more information, visit: http://www.invitrogen.com/site/us/en/home/Products-and-Services/Applications/PCR/real-time-pcr/real-time-pcr-instruments.html
Real Time qPCR  optimization, Calculating PCR Efficiency
 
04:17
http://technologyinscience.blogspot.com/2012/12/generating-standard-curve-to-analyse.html Generating Standard Curve to analyse the reaction optimization - Real Time qPCR, Calculating PCR Efficiency
Views: 29169 Bio-Resource
CFX Manager™ Software Part 4: Doing Data Analysis
 
04:55
For more information, visit http://www.bio-rad.com/yt/4/TechSupport-CFX-Mgr This brief tutorial walks through the various data analysis options in CFX Manager 3.1. Bio-Rad’s CFX Manager™ Software provides intuitive qPCR setup and rich data visualization tools to reduce confusion and anxiety while performing real-time PCR experiments. CFX Manager Software is included with al Bio-Rad CFX Real-Time PCR Detection Systems: • CFX96 Touch™ System • CFX96 Touch™ Deep Well System • CFX384 Touch™ System • CFX Connect™ System Features and Benefits: • One-click experimental setup and data analysis with the Startup Wizard • Easily customized data analysis and export preferences • Application-specific data analysis for gene expression and SNP genotyping studies • Graphical data representation helps you quickly interpret and understand your data http://www.bio-rad.com/en-us/category/pcr-analysis-software?WT.mc_id=sm-GXD-WW-cfx-mgr-vyt_20160121-Hui6dXAabnA We Are Bio-Rad. Our mission: To provide useful, high-quality products and services that advance scientific discovery and improve healthcare. At Bio-Rad, we are united behind this effort. These two objectives are the driving force behind every decision we make, from developing innovative ideas to building global solutions that help solve our customers' greatest challenges. Connect with Bio-Rad Online: Website: http://www.bio-rad.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/1613226/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/biorad/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BioRadLifeSci Instagram: @BioRadLabs Snapchat: @BioRadLabs
Views: 21650 Bio-Rad Laboratories
How to analyze gene expression from cultured cells
 
02:42
Learn how to prepare RNA for gene expression analysis from cultured cells in 7 minutes. The Cells-to-CT™ 1-Step TaqMan Kit is a simple, quick alternative to traditional RNA extraction. This video will show you how to get great qRT-PCR results in a fraction of the time. View the complete protocol here: https://tools.thermofisher.com/content/sfs/manuals/MAN0010650.pdf
Realtime PCR in Hindi
 
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Quantitative realtime PCR in Hindi - This lecture explains about real-time Pcr technique in hindi. It explains the principle of real-time Pcr including the real-time Pcr reaction mix and probes used in real time Pcr process. Real-time Pcr is a specific type of Pcr technique that explains the synthesis of target DNA fragments in real time. We can measure the amount of DNA produced after every rounds of Pcr cycle. This technique is also known as the quantitative Pcr or quantitative real-time Pcr. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the video lecture on real-time Pcr in hindi.
Views: 9309 Shomu's Biology
Troubleshooting qPCR - What are my amplification curves telling me?
 
01:01:10
Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for accurate estimation of gene expression. Part of its appeal for researchers comes from having a protocol that is easy to execute. However when your reactions do not result in ideal amplification, troubleshooting "why" can be challenging. Factors including sample quality, template quantity, master mix differences, assay design, and incorrect primer or probe resuspension can all influence efficient amplification. When troubleshooting, analysis of the appearance of your amplification curve can give you clues towards improving your results. This webinar will present a variety of problematic qPCR issues and how they are manifested in the amplification curve.
Understanding Reverse Transcriptase – Effects on Ct value
 
02:38
The reverse transcription step is one of the greatest sources of variation in RT-qPCR. With SuperScript IV reverse transcriptase, the Ct value can be reduced by as much as 8. This enzyme outperforms wild type reverse transcriptases with better sensitivity at lower target concentrations. And it shortens the reaction time to just 10 minutes.
Understanding Melt Curves for Improved SYBR® Green Assay Analysis and Troubleshooting
 
01:07:42
qPCR assays using intercalating dyes, such as SYBR® Green dye, are an economical and effective tool for measuring gene expression. To interpret intercalating dye assays, users need to know how to analyze melt curves, and understand the benefits and limitations of melt curve analysis. In this presentation, Nick Downey, PhD, covers melt curve basics and shares examples of multiple peaks due to suboptimal sample prep, primer dimers, and asymmetric GC content of amplicons. He demonstrates troubleshooting strategies. Experienced and novice users will benefit from an overview of uMelt software, developed by the Wittwer lab at the University of Utah, that can predict the melt profile of your assay before you run your experiment.
ClinilabTube: QIAGEN's real-time PCR system (Rotor-Gene Q)
 
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Rotor-Gene Q - Germany REAL-TIME PCR system from Clinilab - Egypt شركة كلينيلاب Cell phone : 0106 469 4374 Fax : 02-25257210 The Rotor-Gene Q is an innovative real-time cycler that enables high-precision real-time PCR thanks to its unique rotary design. The tubes rotate rapidly in a chamber of moving air, which results in uniform and accurate temperatures for every sample. When each tube aligns with the detection optics, the sample is illuminated and the fluorescent signal is rapidly collected by a single, short optical pathway. This unique design results in sensitive and fast real-time PCR and eliminates the sample-to-sample variations that typically occur in block-based instruments. Interchangeable rotors provide the flexibility to use different sample volumes and tube formats. Advanced instrument design also enables superior performance in High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis. All state-of-the-art PCR and HRM analysis procedures are supported by a comprehensive software package. To take full advantage of this advanced cycling technology, use the Rotor-Gene Q in combination with specially optimized QIAGEN PCR kits and assays. The Rotor-Gene Q provides: ************************* * Outstanding thermal and optical performance * More applications than any other real-time cycler * Unmatched optical range with up to 6 channels spanning UV to infra-red wavelengths * Robust design for easy setup and minimal maintenance * Full compatibility with the QIAgility for automated PCR setup join Clinilab on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/clinilab.analysis
High Resolution Melt Analysis Tutorial
 
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High resolution melt (HRM) analysis is a relatively new technique used in detecting small variations in DNA sequences between varying populations. Important applications of HRM include SNP analysis, genotyping and methylation analysis. In the following 20 minute tutorial presented by Sean Taylor, Field Application Specialist, Bio-Rad Laboratories, you will learn the basics of high resolution melt analysis and how to practically use it in your research.
Views: 27134 americanbiotech
Real time PCR using SYBR green probe
 
02:44
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), also called real-time polymerase chain reaction, is a laboratory technique of molecular biology based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. For one or more specific sequences in a DNA sample, quantitative PCR enables both detection and quantification. The quantity can be either an absolute number of copies or a relative amount when normalized to DNA input or additional normalizing genes. The procedure follows the general principle of polymerase chain reaction; its key feature is that the amplified DNA is detected as the reaction progresses in "real time". This is a new approach compared to standard PCR, where the product of the reaction is detected at its end. Two common methods for the detection of products in quantitative PCR are: (1) non-specific fluorescent dyes that intercalate with any double-stranded DNA, and (2) sequence-specific DNA probes consisting of oligonucleotides that are labelled with a fluorescent reporter which permits detection only after hybridization of the probe with its complementary sequence to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and non-coding RNA in cells or tissues. qPCR is the abbreviation used for quantitative PCR (real-time PCR).[1] Real-time reverse-transcription PCR is often denoted as: qRT-PCR[2][3][4] The acronym "RT-PCR" commonly denotes reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and not real-time PCR, but not all authors adhere to this convention. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 115678 Shomu's Biology
VIASURE Real Time PCR Detection Kits. Nucleic acids extraction & Initiation Protocol
 
08:55
Real Time PCR is a high sensitive and specific tool for molecular diagnostic. It has been designed for the diagnosis of infectious diseases caused by different pathogens in human samples.
Views: 4854 Certest Biotec, S.L.
Virtual LAB | Real Time PCR
 
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second virtual lab activity for Egypt Scholars Cancer Focus Group Title: Real Time PCR Speaker : Reham Srour . . تابعنا على قنواتنا المختلفة ---------------------------------------------- http://www.egyptscholars.org ---------------------------------------------- https://twitter.com/EgyptScholars ---------------------------------------------- https://facebook.com/EgyptScholars ---------------------------------------------- شــاهد أيضا دوراتنا المتخصصة التــالية ---------------------------------------------- مشروع خطوات | دليلك للدراسة في الخارج http://goo.gl/HYO6V4 ---------------------------------------------- مشروع وعــــي | جديد التكنولوجيا بين يديك http://goo.gl/wbrnD0 ---------------------------------------------- مشروع مـمــكن | هندسـة من أجل المكـفـوفين http://goo.gl/TFrOh4 ---------------------------------------------- دورة متخصصة | أساسيات البحث العلــمي http://goo.gl/RTN3li ---------------------------------------------- دورة متخصصة | سـلســلــة الخـوارزميات http://goo.gl/IjuLkr ---------------------------------------------- دورة متخصصة | كورس إدارة المشروعات http://goo.gl/wpe6g6 ---------------------------------------------- دورة متخصصة | مجموعة مكافحة السرطان http://goo.gl/0U01VK ---------------------------------------------- دورة متخصصة | رحلة بحثية في علم المحاسبة http://goo.gl/ymMThB ---------------------------------------------- منح دراسية ,كيفية الحصول على بعثة دراسية ,الحصول على بعثة دراسية ,كيفية الحصول على بعثة دراسية من وزارة التعليم العالي ,كيف احصل على بعثة ,فرص منح دراسية ,الصندوق الخيري الاجتماعي منح دراسيه ,منح دراسية لليبيين ,منح دراسية لبريطانيا ,المنح الدراسية في تركيا ,المنح الدراسية في كندا ,التسجيل في المنح ,كتابة البحث العلمي ,طرق كتابة البحث العلمي ,طريقه كتابه البحث العلمي ,كيفيه كتابه البحث العلمي ,كتابة البحث العلمي صياغة جديدة ,انواع مناهج البحث ,خطوات البحث العلمي ,خطوات اعداد البحث العلمي ,خطوات البحث العلمي بالتفصيل ,خطوات البحث العلمي مع الشرح ,خطوات عمل البحث العلمي ,خطوات كتابه البحث العلمي ,اهداف البحث العلمي ,ادوات البحث العلمي ,عناصر البحث العلمي ,اساليب البحث العلمي ,طرق البحث العلمي ,منهج البحث العلمي ,ماهو البحث العلمي ,عمادة البحث العلمي ,انواع البحث العلمي ,مفهوم البحث العلمي ,ملتقى البحث العلمي ,اخلاقيات البحث العلمي ,مهارات البحث العلمي ,مراحل البحث العلمي ,مصادر البحث العلمي ,اساسيات البحث العلمى ,مسابقة البحث العلمي
Views: 3792 Egypt Scholars Inc.
Less Time to Real-Time PCR with Ambion® Cells-to-CT™ kits
 
01:56
http://www.lifetechnologies.com/cellstoct Gene expression analysis is so much easier when you can leave out the mRNA isolation step altogether, and instead prepare your cells directly for real-time PCR. You'll get your real-time PCR results in less time with the Ambion® Cells-to-CT™ Kits. It is fast, easy and robust. Fewer handling steps ensure shorter protocol time, increased consistency, minimal sample loss and a reduced risk for contamination. Learn more at http://www.lifetechnologies.com/cellstoct Find us on Facebok at: https://www.facebook.com/Ambion.LifeTech and Twitter: @The_RNA_Experts [audio transcript] Traditionally, the first step in real-time PCR is to isolate the RNA. This isolation step can require significant time and involve multiple handling steps, and a risk of sample loss. Ambion® Cells-to-CT™ Kits provide a simple and rapid method for preparing cell lysates. Relative gene expression is measured directly from cell lysates, eliminating the need to purify RNA prior to amplification. Ambion® Cells-to-CT™ Kits use the simple 7-minute sample preparation procedure. First ten, to a hundred thousand cultured cells are washed with phosphate-buffered saline. They are then mixed with Lysis Solution, and incubated at room temperature for 5 minutes. The Ambion® Cells-to-CT™ also reduces the risk of contamination and loss of sample since there are few steps in which the sample is pipette. Cells are lysed during this incubation and RNA is released into the Lysis Solution which also contains reagents to inactivate endogenous RNases. If DNase I is added to the Lysis Solution, genomic DNA is also degraded at this step. 5 minutes later, a Stop Solution is mixed into the lysate to inactivate the lysis reagents - leaving you with a sample, ready for Real Time PCR with results equivalent to pure RNA. No heating, washing, or centrifugation steps are required as are for traditional RNA purification methods.
Views: 313757 Thermo Fisher Scientific
Absolute Quantification of mRNAs - Ask TaqMan #26
 
04:54
Submit your question: http://bit.ly/1cgFftk Relative quantitation is the most common application with real-time PCR, but sometimes fold change data is just not enough. For instance, let's say I'm looking at samples infected with HIV and I need to know exactly how many copies of virus are present in the sample. What other options are there, when you need more concrete answers? That brings us to this great question from Jamsai Duangporn at Monash University who asks "Can TaqMan assays to be used to determine the absolute quantity of the mRNAs?" TaqMan assays can be used for a technique called Absolute Quantitation, sometimes also known as Standard Curve analysis. ABSOLUTE QUANTIFICATION involves the precise molecular measure of a target concentration. In an ABSOLUTE QUANTIFICATION experiment, samples of a known quantity are serially diluted and then amplified to generate a standard curve. The unknown samples can then be extrapolated into quantities based on the slope of this curve. The main hurdle in an ABSOLUTE QUANTIFICATION experiment is the generation of this standard curve. Although it seems simple in principle, there are a lot of things to consider! Your standard needs to meet the following criteria: First, the quantity of a sample must be known by some independent means. For this step, the concentration can be measured by with a spectrophotometer and converted to number of copies using the molecular weight of the DNA or RNA. You can also refer to our handy guide called "Creating Standard Curves" for more details on how to do this. Second, the standard should closely resemble the target from a biological standpoint, and it is very important that the DNA or RNA be a single, pure species. For example, when measuring gene expression of RNA transcripts, you would want to use in vitro transcribed RNA. Take care here because purity will be an important factor in the accuracy of your measurement. Third and finally, don't forget that your excellent pipetting skills can be put to good use here! One of the major pitfalls for scientists setting up standard curves is that they do not pay enough attention accuracy of pipetting of technical replicates. For the best results from your standard curve, ensure that your pipets have been recently calibrated. Be very careful when making dilutions and pipetting into the plate, and ideally make use of low retention tips. Now that we have our standards, let's setup a dilution curve in our plate. We recommend to run in triplicate, with 10 fold dilutions and at least 5 points. When set up correctly, all ABI Real-Time PCR instrument software will generate a standard curve for you from these points. The equation of the linear regression line through those points is then used to automatically calculate the quantities of any unknowns on the plate, in the same units. For example, in this curve I have 5 points, starting with 20,000 copies of my target as the highest concentration going down to 1250 copies. The standard curve plot is showing the input on the x-axis as [log X] and the Ct values on the y-axis. Quantities are then determined from this equation: We'll remove any outlying replicates or points when necessary. Solving for X using the Ct values of our unknown samples will give us the missing quantities. Notice that they will be in the same units as our standards; copies for copies, ng for ng, and so on. So now we have determined the absolute quantities of our unknown samples!
Real Time PCR - Basic simple animation - part 1 intro HD
 
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This is a basic video about quantitative/ Real Time PCR. This is just an introduction. More videos will follow. Watch the other videos as well. 'regular' PCR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkT6XHWne6E How to interpret amplification plot http://youtu.be/fSj7HwzFCdg
Views: 197641 MrSimpleScience

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