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How to Write Up a Discourse Analysis
 
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This video explains features of a discourse analysis article that are helpful for students in learning to write about their own studies. To view the video on writing qualitative findings paragraphs mentioned in this video, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmKuvwk8x84
Communication Research Methods - Discourse Analysis
 
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Introduction to Discourse Analysis Communication Research Methods Arkansas State University
Views: 12930 Dan's Academy
What is Discourse Analysis?
 
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Discourse and discourse analysis are defined, briefly, in three ways: 1) as language beyond the sentence, 2) as language in use, and 3) as larger social processes that precede and are produced by language.
Discourse Analysis for research methods by Katharine Farrell
 
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Prof. Katharine N. Farrell introduces the modern and post-modern conceptions of the discourse analysis in social studies; which are the source materials for an empirical discourse analysis and what is involved in collecting them. This is the second lecture of a SIC course on Research Design and Methods in Political Ecology organized by ICTA-UAB, under the FP7-Marie Curie project “The European Network of Political Ecology”; Barcelona, 2nd-7th June 2013. Prof. Katharine N. Farrell is senior researcher at Humoldt University of Berlin, ENTITLE network.
Views: 4410 PoliticalEcology.eu
Introduction to Discourse Analysis
 
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Short introduction to discourse analysis
Views: 50138 Nature Therapy
Introduction to Discourse Analysis
 
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In this video, I introduce an important method for studying political communication: discourse analysis. Through practical examples, you will find out more about discourse theory and about the things that researchers look for as they analyse political texts.
Views: 120662 Florian Schneider
Discourse Analysis Part 2: Foucauldian Approaches
 
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From a lecture given in 2015 by Graham R Gibbs at the University of Huddersfield. This second session examines the ideas behind a Foucauldian Discourse Analysis and draws also on some ideas from Critical Discourse Analysis. The distinctive contributions of Michel Foucault's approach are discussed before some of the key ways of carrying out a Foucauldian analysis are examined. The session ends with a brief discussion of some of the criticisms of both Foucauldian and Psychological discourse analysis. Sounds and music: 'Fifth Avenue Stroll' from iLife Sound Effects, http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/ilife09.pdf Images: Freizeitanlage Kräwinklerbrücke, Kräwinklerbrücke in Remscheid by Frank Vincentz, Wikimedia Commons, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Michel Foucault, from Wikipedia from Exeter Centre for Advanced International Studies Research Priorities under fair use. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Foucault5.jpg References Hall, S. (1992). The West and the Rest in Hall, S., & Gieben, B. (Eds.). (1992). Formations of modernity (p. 1275). Cambridge: Polity Press. Edley, N. (2001). Analysing masculinity: Interpretative repertoires, ideological dilemmas and subject positions. In Wetherell, M, Taylor, S. and Yates, S. J (Eds) Discourse as data: A guide for analysis, 189-228. Parker, I (1992) Discourse Dynamics: Critical Analysis for Social and Individual Psychology, London: Routledge
Views: 50306 Graham R Gibbs
Lecture 74 — Discourse Analysis | NLP | University of Michigan
 
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. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "FAIR USE" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. .
What is DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean? DISCOURSE ANALYSIS definition
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ GET FREE BITCOINS just for surfing the web as you usually do - https://bittubeapp.com/?ref?2JWO9YEAJ ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean? DISCOURSE ANALYSIS meaning - DISCOURSE ANALYSIS definition - DISCOURSE ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Discourse analysis (DA), or discourse studies, is a general term for a number of approaches to analyze written, vocal, or sign language use, or any significant semiotic event. The objects of discourse analysis—discourse, writing, conversation, communicative event—are variously defined in terms of coherent sequences of sentences, propositions, speech, or turns-at-talk. Contrary to much of traditional linguistics, discourse analysts not only study language use 'beyond the sentence boundary', but also prefer to analyze 'naturally occurring' language use, and not invented examples. Text linguistics is a closely related field. The essential difference between discourse analysis and text linguistics is that discourse analysis aims at revealing socio-psychological characteristics of a person/persons rather than text structure. Discourse analysis has been taken up in a variety of social science disciplines, including linguistics, education, sociology, anthropology, social work, cognitive psychology, social psychology, area studies, cultural studies, international relations, human geography, communication studies, and translation studies, each of which is subject to its own assumptions, dimensions of analysis, and methodologies.
Views: 19809 The Audiopedia
Discourse analysis
 
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Subject:Communication studies Paper:Communications Research
Views: 15195 Vidya-mitra
Teun van Dijk. Discourse and Knowledge
 
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Speaker: Teun van Dijk, is a scholar in the fields of text linguistics, discourse analysis and Critical Discourse Analysis Author of several monographs including Text and context. Explorations in the semantics and pragmatics of discourse. London: Longman, 1977, Strategies of Discourse Comprehension. with Walter Kintsch. New York: Academic Press, 1983, News as Discourse. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1988. Annotation: In this lecture I'll tell about the progress of my new book Discourse and Knowledge by summarizing some results of the respective chapters of this multidiscpliinary study. I propose a new, relativist and naturalistic approach to knowledge defined as beliefs shared and justfied by the criteria of an epistemic community. I summarize how knowledge is involved in the cognitive processes of discourse production and comprehension, and how knowledge as a form of social cognition, just like attitudes and ideologies is shared in a sociocultural epistemic community or in specific social groups, for instance through epistemic institutions such as schools and the mass media. Since knowledge depends on the criteria of epistemic communities, an anthropological approach studies the cultural variation of knowledge(s) across the world. Finally, the linguistic and discourse analytical approach to knowledge goes beyond the usual study of the expression or presupposition of knowledge in sentences -- as is the case for the study of topic and focus, evidentials, modalities or presuppositions -- and details how knowledge is managed in discourse for the establishment of global (discursive) topic and focus, local and global coherence, various kinds of description, granularity, and many other properties of knowledge based on the expression of semantic situation models controlled by pragmatic context models.
Views: 69739 EUSPchannel
Linguistics and Discourse Analysis
 
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A prezicast on linguistics and discourse analysis.
Views: 44420 i tutor
MOOC - Corpus linguistics: method, analysis, interpretation
 
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Professor Tony McEnery introduces Lancaster's first MOOC - Corpus linguistics: method, analysis, interpretation. Available via FutureLearn from January 2014: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/corpus-linguistics
Views: 15739 Lancaster University
What is CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ GET FREE BITCOINS just for surfing the web as you usually do - https://bittubeapp.com/?ref?2JWO9YEAJ ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean? CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS meaning - CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS definition - CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Critical discourse analysis (CDA) is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of discourse that views language as a form of social practice. Scholars working in the tradition of CDA generally argue that (non-linguistic) social practice and linguistic practice constitute one another and focus on investigating how societal power relations are established and reinforced through language use. Critical discourse analysis emerged from 'critical linguistics' developed at the University of East Anglia in the 1970s, and the terms are now often interchangeable. Sociolinguistics was paying little attention to social hierarchy and power. CDA was first developed by the Lancaster school of linguists of which Norman Fairclough was the most prominent figure. Ruth Wodak has also made a major contribution to this field of study. In addition to linguistic theory, the approach draws from social theory—and contributions from Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, Louis Althusser, Jürgen Habermas, Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu—in order to examine ideologies and power relations involved in discourse. Language connects with the social through being the primary domain of ideology, and through being both a site of, and a stake in, struggles for power. Ideology has been called the basis of the social representations of groups, and, in psychological versions of CDA developed by Teun A. van Dijk and Ruth Wodak, there is assumed to be a sociocognitive interface between social structures and discourse structures. The historical dimension in critical discourse studies also plays an important role. Although CDA is sometimes mistaken to represent a 'method' of discourse analysis, it is generally agreed upon that any explicit method in discourse studies, the humanities and social sciences may be used in CDA research, as long as it is able to adequately and relevantly produce insights into the way discourse reproduces (or resists) social and political inequality, power abuse or domination. That is, CDA does not limit its analysis to specific structures of text or talk, but systematically relates these to structures of the sociopolitical context. CDA has been used to examine political speech acts, to highlight the rhetoric behind these, and any forms of speech that may be used to manipulate the impression given to the audience. However, there have been flaws noted with CDA. For example, it has been said that it is simultaneously too broad to distinctly identify manipulations within the rhetoric, yet is also not powerful enough to appropriately find all that researchers set out to establish. Norman Fairclough developed a three-dimensional framework for studying discourse, where the aim is to map three separate forms of analysis onto one another: analysis of (spoken or written) language texts, analysis of discourse practice (processes of text production, distribution and consumption) and analysis of discursive events as instances of sociocultural practice. Particularly, he combines micro, meso and macro-level interpretation. At the micro-level, the analyst considers various aspects of textual/linguistic analysis, for examples syntactic analysis, use of metaphor and rhetorical devices. The meso-level or "level of discursive practice" involves studying issues of production and consumption, for instance, which institution produced a text, who is the target audience, etc. At the macro-level, the analyst is concerned with intertextual and interdiscursive elements and tries to take into account the broad, societal currents that are affecting the text being studied.
Views: 23438 The Audiopedia
Speech Act and Discourse Analysis (ENG)
 
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Subject:English Paper: Introduction to Linguistics & Phonetics
Views: 10642 Vidya-mitra
Fairclough Critical Discourse Analysis
 
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Buy our app and get access to the models. You can place your own content in the model and use it for your assignments. You can use it in your teaching or presentations as well – just remember to tell it’s from flixabout.com. Furthermore, you get to see the full text for the movies. Prize for the App: 2 Euro. Enjoy. https://itunes.apple.com/dk/app/forklar-mig-lige/id1034714497?mt=8 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.flixabout.flixabout Norman Fairclough (born 1941) is an emeritus Professor of Linguistics at Lancaster University in England. He is one of the founders of critical discourse analysis (CDA) as applied to sociolinguistics. CDA is concerned with how power is exercised through language.
Views: 38934 flixabout.com
A  Brief Introduction to Discourse Analysis
 
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Video for course work... related to qualitative research methods
Views: 4129 Charles Davis
A Two stage Parsing Method for Text level Discourse Analysis | ACL 2017 | Outstanding Paper
 
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Paper Link: http://www.aclweb.org/anthology/P17-2029 . . Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "FAIR USE" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
What is Discourse Analysis?
 
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What is Discourse Analysis?
Views: 67 ADRIANO GASPAR
Discourse analysis
 
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Discourse analysis (DA), or discourse studies, is a general term for a number of approaches to analyze written, vocal, or sign language use or any significant semiotic event. The objects of discourse analysis—discourse, writing, conversation, communicative event—are variously defined in terms of coherent sequences of sentences, propositions, speech, or turns-at-talk. Contrary to much of traditional linguistics, discourse analysts not only study language use 'beyond the sentence boundary', but also prefer to analyze 'naturally occurring' language use, and not invented examples. Text linguistics is related. The essential difference between discourse analysis and text linguistics is that it aims at revealing socio-psychological characteristics of a person/persons rather than text structure. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 29432 Audiopedia
What is..? textual analysis
 
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Presented by Imelda McDermott and Jonathan Hammond. Although discourse analysis has gained popularity in social research, there has been less attention on linguistic analysis of texts. Text analysis is an essential part of discourse analysis and this kind of ‘micro’ analysis provides a valuable supplement to other methods of analysis. This session showed examples of how to analyse both spoken (interviews) and written (policy documents) texts.
Views: 11476 methodsMcr
Rene Descartes: Discourse on the Method - Summary and Analysis
 
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A summary and analysis of Rene Descartes' Discourse on the Method. My blog: http://www.gbwwblog.wordpress.com Please help support this channel: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=NENKLMFE999KW Rene Descartes, Thug Notes, 8-Bit Philosophy, Wisecrack, Sparknotes, Video Sparknotes, Academy of Ideas, The School of Life, Philosophy Tube Descartes Rationalism Cogito Cogito ergo sum Philosophy Epistemology Summary Analysis I think therefore I am Discourse on the Method
Views: 14360 The Rugged Pyrrhus
Day 1 - 1st Panel - Discource analysis methods: Corpora and the linguist's lense
 
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Periklis Politis (Aristotle University) Using corpora to study populist discourse(s) Titika Dimitroulia & Dionysis Goutsos (Aristotle University & University of Athens) Corpora in humanities and social sciences research. Populism in Greek. Eliza Kitis (Aristotle University) Populism and 'λαϊκισμός' through the linguist's lenses
Views: 348 Populismus
Discourse Analysis (PSY)
 
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Subject:Psychology Paper:Qualitative methods
Views: 336 Vidya-mitra
Content Analysis
 
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Let's go on a journey and learn how to perform a content analysis!
Views: 114462 ChrisFlipp
The analysis of narratives
 
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Examines the use of narratives in speech and in research analysis. Beginning with a look at the range of ways narratives might be analysed such as linguistic, structural and thematic. Attention is then turned to some of the functions of narrative. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Works referred to in the video include: Bury, M (2001) “Illness narratives: Fact or Fiction” Sociology of Health and Illness 23: 263-85 Cortazzi, M (1993) Narrative Analysis. London: Falmer Press. Denzin, N.K. (1989) Interpretive biography. Newbury Park, Calif., London: Sage. Labov, W. (1972) 'The transformation of experience in narrative syntax', in W. Labov (ed), Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 354-396. Lieblich, A., Tuval-Mashiach, R. and Zilber, T. (1998) Narrative Research: Reading, Analysis and Interpretation. London: Sage. Mishler, E.G. (1986) Research Interviewing: Context and Narrative, Cambridge Mass.: Havard University Press Rhodes, C., and Brown, A.D. (2005) “Narrative, Organizations and Research”, International Journal of Management Research, 5: 167-88. Riessman, C.K. (1993) Narrative Analysis. Newbury Park, CA, London: Sage. Credits: Sounds and music: 'Fifth Avenue Stroll' from iLife Sound Effects, http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/ilife09.pdf Image: Freizeitanlage Kräwinklerbrücke, Kräwinklerbrücke in Remscheid by Frank Vincentz, Wikimedia Commons, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Views: 37382 Graham R Gibbs
How to Know You Are Coding Correctly: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Coding your qualitative data, whether that is interview transcripts, surveys, video, or photographs, is a subjective process. So how can you know when you are doing it well? We give you some basic tips.
Understanding Gee's "What is Discourse Analysis?"
 
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A video to help you understand the key terms in Gee's "What is Discourse Analysis?"
Views: 10123 UNF writes
Research Methods 2 - Media Analysis & Visual Methods
 
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***Click the times below to jump to that part of the lecture*** 01:28 - Media Analysis: Framing 08:54 - Models for analyzing media 15:40 - Some examples of frame analyses 21:24 - Discourse Analysis 24:00 - Critical Discourse Analysis 27:38 - Visual Methods 47:44 - Some examples of photo elicitation and using maps 57:15 - (Even) More 'Out-there'
Views: 524 Jeroen Moes
What is CONTENT ANALYSIS? What does CONTENT ANALYSIS mean? CONTENT ANALYSIS meaning & explanation
 
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What is CONTENT ANALYSIS? What does CONTENT ANALYSIS mean? CONTENT ANALYSIS meaning - CONTENT ANALYSIS definition - CONTENT ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Content analysis is a research method for studying documents and communication artifacts, which can be texts of various formats, pictures, audio or video. Social scientists use content analysis to quantify patterns in communication, in a replicable and systematic manner. One of the key advantage of this research method is to analyse social phenomena in a non-invasive way, in contrast to simulating social experiences or collecting survey answers. Practices and philosophies of content analysis vary between scholarly communities. They all involve systematic reading or observation of texts or artifacts which are assigned labels (sometimes called codes) to indicate the presence of interesting, meaningful patterns. After labeling a large set of media, a researcher is able to statistically estimate the proportions of patterns in the texts, as well as correlations between patterns. Computers are increasingly used in content analysis, to automate the labeling (or coding) of documents. Simple computational techniques can provide descriptive data such as word frequencies and document lengths. Machine learning classifiers can greatly increase the number of texts which can be labeled, but the scientific utility of doing so is a matter of debate. Content analysis is best understood as a broad family of techniques. Effective researchers choose techniques that best help them answer their substantive questions. That said, according to Klaus Krippendorff, six questions must be addressed in every content analysis: 1. Which data are analyzed? 2. How are the data defined? 3. From what population are data drawn? 4. What is the relevant context? 5. What are the boundaries of the analysis? 6. What is to be measured? The simplest and most objective form of content analysis considers unambiguous characteristics of the text such as word frequencies, the page area taken by a newspaper column, or the duration of a radio or television program. Analysis of simple word frequencies is limited because the meaning of a word depends on surrounding text. Keyword In Context routines address this by placing words in their textual context. This helps resolve ambiguities such as those introduced by synonyms and homonyms. A further step in analysis is the distinction between dictionary-based (quantitative) approaches and qualitative approaches. Dictionary-based approaches set up a list of categories derived from the frequency list of words and control the distribution of words and their respective categories over the texts. While methods in quantitative content analysis in this way transform observations of found categories into quantitative statistical data, the qualitative content analysis focuses more on the intentionality and its implications. There are strong parallels between qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis.
Views: 10142 The Audiopedia
Craig Owen - A Theoretical and Hands-on Introduction to Foucauldian Discourse Analysis
 
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Building on Michel Foucault's work on power, discourse, knowledge and language, Foucauldian Discourse Analysis offers critical analysis of a range of multi-media texts, practices and social interactions. In the workshop, participants explored the key principles of social constructionism and Foucault's work which underpin this method. Workshop participants then worked in small groups to analyse a contemporary pop video by "Plan B". The workshop concluded with a discussion of how the method could be integrated into the workshop participants' ongoing research. Videos included: Biased News Media Coverage Against Blacks vs Whites - Frank White https://youtu.be/jRknjB2WsaQ Plan B - She Said - PlanBUK https://youtu.be/rQjh9H-ymK4
Views: 975 Multimedia Services
Discourse Analysis, Types,Elements,Importance,Text Complete In Urdu and Hindi
 
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Notes link https://www.facebook.com/bsenglishofficial/posts/734153283617425?__xts__%5B0%5D=68.ARDh1OuDu2V53If2zH96522GTw3IyqYhSs5pkdDS6_xlcQXE12ZYdOi87tWD-5C_pHJTZ0yled_ZmpSJlfePqS5ptVAeIx_V4CNSTgPjab5CQdF9Keb_EqZTNH6Zl14-X6POhY3KAIoNt1SMaCWu-Wu4MFwe4oxo3VlSPINIVMwxAktBFqnHkSmWYwLZd5EdXtX2qJNYFhIf18HHgGVDuzli7Fefsw385ptpNMroZTa61e410poDijRsoMG7ejMXo8TooOAxVZ6eOhJdQbl26Zo7Fi0KhSeivtXZWwxW1mNGdS6VeI_UBwQ1uhnoEjZ25-7qO1PjzUNHPgp4r0g&__tn__=K-R
Narrative Discourse : An Introduction
 
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Subject:Linguistics Paper: Linguistic Stylistics
Views: 773 Vidya-mitra
Critical discourse analysis
 
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Critical discourse analysis is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of discourse that views language as a form of social practice. Scholars working in the tradition of CDA generally assume that social practice and linguistic practice constitute one another and focus on investigating how societal power relations are established and reinforced through language use. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 21500 Audiopedia
Comm Research Methods - Content Analysis
 
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Content Analysis 101
Views: 4749 Dan's Academy
Feminism research methodologies
 
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Dr. Adrienne Barnett Feminism research methodologies
Research Metholdology: Content Analysis
 
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This video is about Research Metholdology: Content Analysis
Views: 20130 Jessica Kager
What Is The Definition Of Discourse Analysis?
 
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It is a set of 1987) it means discourse and text can be used almost synonymously oct 20, 2008 definition analysis ul li the study how stretches language in communication assume meaning, frequently defined as use above level sentence (stubbs, 1983) provides students with opportunity to jun 24, 2016. Discourse analysis thoughtcodiscourse thoughtco. Stubbs' textbook (stubbs 1983 1), in which discourse analysis is defined as (a) concerned with language jun 25, 2009 the study of social life, understood through examples analytic research relevant to family practice what do we mean by 'discourse analysis'? Thus, structures meaning may involve such diverse ones overall topics and their organization text or talk, define linguistic relations definition elements a that extend operate beyond sentence. Discourse is the creation and organization of segments a analysis defined as (1) concerned with language use beyond discourse does not presuppose bias towards study either spoken or key words analysistextual analysis; Contextual from sociological standpoint, any practice by. Discourse analysis (da), or discourse studies, is a general term for number of approaches to analyze written, vocal, sign language use, any significant semiotic event aug 3, 2017 broad the study ways in which used texts and contexts, texts' surrounding defining mar more broadly, it means use spoken written social (paul baker sibonile ellece, key terms sometimes defined as 'beyond sentence'. Discourse analysis what speakers do in conversation. Wikipedia wiki discourse_analysis url? Q webcache. Discourse analysis wikipedia en. Discourse analysis thoughtco. Sociological discourse analysis methods and logic. Llas centre for what is discourse analysis? What does analysis linguistic cfp. Discourse definition and examples thoughtco. Definition of discourse analysis by merriam definition and meaning slidesharelearning teaching. Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples oct 31, 2008 discourse analysis a is behavioral unit. Originally the word discourse' comes from latin dec 23, 2010 linguistic discourse analysis introduction and structure 1. Call for papers university of what is meant by discourse analysis? . What do we mean by 'discourse analysis'? Discourse in society. Googleusercontent search. Discourse analysis what is it and why relevant to family practice? . See more one starting point is the following quotation from m. This contrasts with types of analysis more typical modern a method analysing the structure texts or utterance meaning, pronunciation, example sentences, and from oxford dictionaries discourse definition, study rules patterns characterizing units connected speech writing longer than sentence. In order to specify which of the numerous senses is analyzed in following dissertation it has be defined. Linguistic discourse analysis definition of in english. Define discourse analysis at dictionary what is meant by analysis? .
Views: 346 Another Question II
PHILOSOPHY - Michel Foucault
 
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Michel Foucault was a philosophical historian who questioned many of our assumptions about how much better the world is today compared with the past. When he looked at the treatment of the mad, at the medical profession and at sexuality, he didn't see the progress that's routinely assumed. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/9aEZsh FURTHER READING “Michel Foucault (1926-1984) was a French 20th-century philosopher and historian who spent his career forensically critiquing the power of the modern bourgeois capitalist state, including its police, law courts, prisons, doctors and psychiatrists. His goal was to work out nothing less than how power worked and then to change it in the direction of a Marxist-anarchist utopia. Though he spent most of his life in libraries and seminar rooms, he was a committedly revolutionary figure, who met with enormous popularity in elite Parisian intellectual circles (Jean Paul Sartre admired him deeply) and still maintains a wide following among young people studying at university in the prosperous corners of the world…” You can read more on this and many other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org: https://goo.gl/jtltOU MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/K8d984 More films on PHILOSOPHY in our playlist below: http://bit.ly/TSOLphilosophy Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/9i7C7B SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mad Adam http://www.madadamfilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 2136325 The School of Life
Content analysis
 
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Basic information about what a content analysis and how to do a content analysis.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 36903 Katie Harrington
The Discursive Psychological Perspective - Critical Social Psychology (22/30)
 
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Ai introduction to the discursive psychological perspective from Dr Bianca Rabbe and Professor Margaret Wetherell. (Part 22 of 30) Playlist link - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL528A6A714B6796B6 Transcript link - http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/dd307-social-psychology/transcript/dd307discursive01.pdf Open Learn content - Critical Social Psychology: Track 1 https://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/psychology/critical-social-psychology Study Q83 BSc (Honours) Social Psychology http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q83 Study module DD801 - Principles of social and psychological inquiry http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/dd801 The Open University is the world’s leading provider of flexible, high-quality online degrees and distance learning, serving students across the globe with highly respected degree qualifications, and the triple-accredited MBA. The OU teaches through its own unique method of distance learning, called ‘supported open learning’ and you do not need any formal qualifications to study with us, just commitment and a desire to find out what you are capable of. Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ouopenlearn/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OUFreeLearning #OpenUniversity #SocialPsychology
Iver Neumann   Discourse & Practice Analysis
 
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“Discourse and Practice Analysis” Professor Iver Neumann IR is long on debates about meta-theory, theory and methodology, but short on method, understood as the process of producing data. Drawing on his new book with Kevin Dunn, Undertaking Discourse Analysis for Social Research (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2016), Iver Neumann will discuss some practical challenges when using discourse analysis. Iver B. Neumann is professor at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs and the outgoing Montague Burton Professor in IR, London School of Economics. His latest book is ‘Russia and the Idea of Europe’, 2nd ed. (London: Routledge, 2017). “Learn with the Knowledge Leaders”
What is DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY? What does DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY mean?
 
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What is DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY? What does DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY mean? DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY meaning - DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY definition - DISCURSIVE PSYCHOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Discursive psychology (DP) is a form of discourse analysis that focuses on psychological themes in talk, text and images. As a counter to mainstream psychology’s treatment of discourse as a “mirror” for people’s expressions of thoughts, intentions, motives, etc., DP’s founders made the case for picturing it instead as if a “construction yard” wherein all such presumptively prior and independent notions of thought and so on were built from linguistic materials, topicalised and, in various less direct ways, handled and managed. Here, the study of the psychological implies commitment not to the inner life of the mind, but rather, to the written and spoken practices within which people invoked, implicitly or explicitly, notions precisely like “the inner life of the mind”. Discursive psychology therefore starts with psychological phenomena as things that are constructed, attended to, and understood in interaction. An evaluation, say, may be constructed using particular phrases and idioms, responded to by the recipient (as a compliment perhaps) and treated as the expression of a strong position. In discursive psychology the focus is not on psychological matters somehow leaking out into interaction; rather interaction is the primary site where psychological issues are live. It is philosophically opposed to more traditional cognitivist approaches to language. It uses studies of naturally occurring conversation to critique the way that topics have been conceptualised and treated in psychology. The origins of what is now termed "discursive psychology" can arguably be traced to the late 1980s, and the collaborative research and analysis sessions that took place as part of Loughborough University's then newly formed Discourse and Rhetoric Group (DARG). A key landmark was the publication of Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell's classic text 'Discourse and social psychology: Beyond attitudes and behaviour' in 1987. Charles Antaki, writing in the 'Times Higher Education Supplement', described the impact of this book: 'Potter and Wetherell have genuinely presented us with a different way of working in social psychology. The book's clarity means that it has the power to influence a lot of people ill-at-ease with traditional social psychology but unimpressed with (or simply bewildered by) other alternatives on offer. It could rescue social psychology from the sterility of the laboratory and its traditional mentalism'. The field itself was originally labeled as DP during the early 1990s by Derek Edwards and Jonathan Potter at Loughborough University. It has since been developed and extended by a number of others, including (but by no means limited to): Charles Antaki, Malcolm Ashmore, Frederick Attenborough, Bethan Benwell, Steve Brown, Carly Butler, Derek Edwards, Alexa Hepburn, Eric Laurier, Hedwig te Molder, Jonathan Potter, Sue Speer, Liz Stokoe, Cristian Tileaga, Margaret Wetherell, Sally Wiggins and Sue Wilkinson. Discursive Psychology draws on the philosophy of mind of Ryle and the later Wittgenstein, the rhetorical approach of Michael Billig, the ethnomethodology of Harold Garfinkel, the conversation analysis of Harvey Sacks and the sociology of scientific knowledge of those like Mike Mulkay, Steve Woolgar and Bruno Latour. The term Discursive Psychology was designed partly to indicate that there was not just a methodological shift at work in this form of analysis, but also, and at the same time, that it involved some fairly radical theoretical rethinking. Discursive psychology conducts studies of both naturally occurring and experimentally engineered human interaction that offer new ways of understanding topics in social and cognitive psychology such as memory and attitudes. Although discursive psychology subscribes to a different view of human mentality than is advanced by mainstream psychology, Edwards and Potter's work was originally motivated by their dissatisfaction with how psychology had treated discourse. In many psychological studies, the things people (subjects) say are treated as windows (with varying degrees of opacity) into their minds. Talk is seen as (and in experimental psychology and protocol analysis used as) descriptions of people's mental content. In contrast, discursive psychology treats talk as social action; that is, we say what we do as a means of, and in the course of, doing things in a socially meaningful world. Thus, the questions that it makes sense to ask also change.
Views: 4887 The Audiopedia
Chapter 2.5: Michel Foucault, power
 
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This video is part of the series: 'The Philosophy of the Humanities' which you can find here https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPeStI124dee1ByfcDzRvPxKDNb0GQjmo Intromusic: "Styley" by Gorowski: (http://www.wmrecordings.com/tag/gorowski/)
Computer-assisted text analysis_Prof Clive Seale
 
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This presentation was recorded at the NCRM event on Approaches to Analysing Qualitative Data: Archaeology as a Metaphor for Method. 18 October 2016, Foundling Museum, London
Views: 285 NCRMUK
Sociology Research Methods: Crash Course Sociology #4
 
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Today we’re talking about how we actually DO sociology. Nicole explains the research method: form a question and a hypothesis, collect data, and analyze that data to contribute to our theories about society. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** The Dress via Wired: https://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/ Original: http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Robert Kunz, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Jason A Saslow, Rizwan Kassim, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Steve Marshall, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Kyle Anderson, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Yana Leonor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Justin Zingsheim, Andrea Bareis, Moritz Schmidt, Bader AlGhamdi, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 416767 CrashCourse
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 780331 Kent Löfgren
Corpus Linguistics: The Basics
 
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This is a short introduction to the idea of corpus linguistics, which should help you understand what a corpus is and what it can be used for. The concordancing software Antconc is available here: http://www.laurenceanthony.net/software.html (Music: Elevator Music - David O'Brien)
Views: 24829 Phloneme