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Sanger sequencing method - dideoxy sequencing of DNA
 
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Sanger sequencing method lecture - This lecture explains about the dideoxy chain termination method of DNA sequencing which is also known as Sanger sequencing. The mechanism of Sanger sequencing is explained with this video lecture. In this DNA sequencing approach, modified dideoxy nucleotides are used to cause the chain termination of DNA synthesis which helps to find out the exact DNA sequence. This method of DNA sequencing is named as following - Sanger sequencing Dideoxy sequencing Chain termination method of DNA sequencing. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the DNA sequencing lecture on dideoxy chain termination method also known as the Sanger sequencing of DNA.
Views: 111179 Shomu's Biology
Maxam gilbert DNA sequencing method
 
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This DNA sequencing lecture explains about the Maxam gilbert method of DNA sequencing or chemical DNA sequencing. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 151705 Shomu's Biology
Webinar: Retrieving Exon and Coding Region Sequences for Genes
 
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Presented June 29, 2016. Getting exon sequences for genes is a common task for researchers studying gene structure, expression and sequence variation. Learn how to quickly find and retrieve sequences for exons and coding regions of genes using the Gene Table report from Gene and the download feature of the Graphical Viewer. You will also see how to retrieve all exon sequences at once and for multiple genes using the EDirect command line interface to the Entrez search and retrieval system. Get video updates, subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/ncbinlm Find other NCBI webinars: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/home/coursesandwebinars.shtml
Views: 7179 NCBI
Sequence Analysis using Finch TV and BLAST
 
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This guides students on how to analyze a 16s rRNA gene sequence using Finch TV and determining the likely identity of their nature isolate using BLAST.
Views: 7937 Daren Ginete
Introduction to Next Generation Sequencing
 
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This video is part one of the Next Generation Sequencing miniseries. For more information regarding the Illumina technique, please check out the following link: https://www.illumina.com/content/dam/illumina-marketing/documents/products/illumina_sequencing_introduction.pdf
Biological Sequence Analysis I (2010)
 
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January 19, 2010. Andreas Baxevanis, Ph.D. Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2010 Handout: http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Research/IntramuralResearch/DIRCalendar/CurrentTopicsinGenomeAnalysis2010/CTGA2010_Lec02_color.pdf More: http://www.genome.gov/12514286
DNA cloning
 
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DNA cloning animation - This lecture explains about the DNA cloning techniques with vectors. The molecular mechanism of DNA cloning is explained with animation. http://shomusbiology.com/ Source: Lodish, et al., Molecular Cell Biology, Fifth Edition, W. H. Freeman & Co. © 2004 W. H. Freeman & Co., and Sumanas, Inc. Link- http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent/animations/content/plasmidcloning.html For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching Molecular cloning is a set of experimental methods in molecular biology that are used to assemble recombinant DNA molecules and to direct their replication within host organisms.The use of the word cloning refers to the fact that the method involves the replication of a single DNA molecule starting from a single living cell to generate a large population of cells containing identical DNA molecules. Molecular cloning generally uses DNA sequences from two different organisms: the species that is the source of the DNA to be cloned, and the species that will serve as the living host for replication of the recombinant DNA. Molecular cloning methods are central to many contemporary areas of modern biology and medicine. In a conventional molecular cloning experiment, the DNA to be cloned is obtained from an organism of interest, then treated with enzymes in the test tube to generate smaller DNA fragments. Subsequently, these fragments are then combined with vector DNA to generate recombinant DNA molecules. The recombinant DNA is then introduced into a host organism (typically an easy-to-grow, benign, laboratory strain of E. coli bacteria). This will generate a population of organisms in which recombinant DNA molecules are replicated along with the host DNA. Because they contain foreign DNA fragments, these are transgenic or genetically-modified microorganisms (GMO). Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 399550 Shomu's Biology
DNA  sequencing by Maxam Gilbert method
 
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DNA sequencing by Maxam Gilbert method | Topic index: 1) End labeling 2) restriction enzyme digestion 3) denaturation 4) chemical degradation 5) gel electrophoresis 6) autoradiography 7) sequence determination 8) limitation Maxam–Gilbert sequencing is a method of DNA sequencing developed by Allan Maxam and Walter Gilbert in 1976–1977. This method is based on nucleobase-specific partial chemical modification of DNA and subsequent cleavage of the DNA backbone at sites adjacent to the modified nucleotides. Procedure: Maxam–Gilbert sequencing requires radioactive labeling at one 5′ end of the DNA fragment to be sequenced (typically by a kinase reaction using gamma-32P ATP) and purification of the DNA. Chemical treatment generates breaks at a small proportion of one or two of the four nucleotide bases in each of four reactions (G, A+G, C, C+T). For example, the purines (A+G) are depurinated using formic acid, the guanines (and to some extent the adenines) are methylated by dimethyl sulfate, and the pyrimidines (C+T) are hydrolysed using hydrazine. The addition of salt (sodium chloride) to the hydrazine reaction inhibits the reaction of thymine for the C-only reaction. The modified DNAs may then be cleaved by hot piperidine; (CH2)5NH at the position of the modified base. The concentration of the modifying chemicals is controlled to introduce on average one modification per DNA molecule. Thus a series of labeled fragments is generated, from the radiolabeled end to the first "cut" site in each molecule. The fragments in the four reactions are electrophoresed side by side in denaturing acrylamide gels for size separation. To visualize the fragments, the gel is exposed to X-ray film for autoradiography, yielding a series of dark bands each showing the location of identical radiolabeled DNA molecules. From presence and absence of certain fragments the sequence may be inferred. 1) Preparation of Your Sample The DNA used in Maxam-Gilbert sequencing is first denatured into a single-stranded chain, and labeled on the 5′ end, usually with 32P. 3) Electrophoresis + Autoradiography The next step cleaves the DNA. And this is where the Maxam-Gilbert sequencing gets really interesting. By taking advantage of piperidine and two chemicals that selectively attack purines and pyrimidines (dimethyl sulfate and hydrazine, respectively), the DNA is cleaved at specific points. To be more accurate, using different combinations of these chemicals, you can cleave a DNA sequence wherever there is a C, wherever there is a C or a T; wherever there is a G or wherever there is a G or an A. So, if you put your sample into these 4 different reaction tubes, you obtain different fragments, depending on the combination of chemicals! 3) Electrophoresis + Autoradiography These reactions are then loaded on to a high percentage polyacrylamide gel, to differentiate fragment sizes. The fragments are visualized via the radioactive tag. 4) Reading the Sequence To read the sequence, you begin with the smaller fragments at the bottom of the gel. “Calling” each base involves interpreting the band pattern relative to the four chemical reactions. For example, if a band in the DNA sequence appears in both the G-reaction and the G+A-reaction lanes, then that the nucleotide is a G. If a band in the DNA sequence appears only in the G+A-reaction lane, then it is an A. The same decision process works for the C-reaction and the C+T-reaction lanes. Sequences are confirmed by running replicate reactions on the same gel and comparing the autoradiographic patterns between replicates.
Views: 16679 subrata das
1) Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) - An Introduction
 
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For more information on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), please visit: ➜ Knowledge Base: https://goo.gl/Ce0M4O What is Next Generation Sequencing? ➜ Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful platform that has enabled the sequencing of thousands to millions of DNA molecules simultaneously. This powerful tool is revolutionizing fields such as personalized medicine, genetic diseases, and clinical diagnostics by offering a high throughput option with the capability to sequence multiple individuals at the same time. *Please note that at 2:22, the video refers to an "Illumina MySeq" machine - the correct name of the machine is actually "Illumina MiSeq" Watch the other videos in this series on NGS: ➜ Sample Preparation: https://youtu.be/-kTcFZxP6kM ➜ Coverage & Sample Quality Control: https://youtu.be/PGAfwSRYv1g ➜ NGS Playlist: https://youtu.be/jFCD8Q6qSTM?list=PLTt9kKfqE_0Gem8hIcJEn7YcesuuKdt_n Check out our other video series: ➜ CRISPR Cas9: https://youtu.be/1aJxXWkE3Ek?list=PLTt9kKfqE_0Ei8_rQsrfm01-zQtABTn0Z ➜ Adeno Associated Virus: https://youtu.be/hYHbfQe5h-Q?list=PLTt9kKfqE_0HfXQMX9RPgbcmSWMqVtlBf Connect with us on our social media pages to stay up to date with the latest scientific discoveries: ➜ Facebook: https://goo.gl/hc9KrG ➜ Twitter: https://goo.gl/gGGtT9 ➜ LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/kSmbht ➜ Google+: https://goo.gl/5bRNwC
Mitochondrial DNA
 
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Mitochondrial DNA - lecture explains about the circular mitochondrial genome structure. http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or mDNA[2]) is the DNA located in organelles called mitochondria, structures within eukaryotic cells that convert the chemical energy from food into a form that cells can use, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Most other DNA present in eukaryotic organisms is found in the cell nucleus. Mitochondrial DNA can be regarded as the smallest chromosome coding for only 37 genes and containing only 16,569 base pairs. Human mitochondrial DNA was the first significant part of the human genome to be sequenced. In most species, including humans, mtDNA is inherited solely from the mother.[3] The DNA sequence of mtDNA has been determined from a large number of organisms and individuals (including some organisms that are extinct), and the comparison of those DNA sequences represents a mainstay of phylogenetics, in that it allows biologists to elucidate the evolutionary relationships among species. It also permits an examination of the relatedness of populations, and so has become important in anthropology and field biology. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 59754 Shomu's Biology
Biological Sequence Analysis II - Andy Baxevanis (2016)
 
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March 9, 2016 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2016 More: http://www.genome.gov/CTGA2016
Illumina Sequencing by Synthesis
 
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Explore the Illumina workflow, including sequencing by synthesis (SBS) technology, in 3-dimensional detail. Go from sample preparation, to cluster generation, to sequencing on a system flow cell with the proprietary SBS process, through to data analysis on the BaseSpace® Sequence Hub. Want more details? Download an introduction to Illumina next-generation sequencing technology for an in-depth look at SBS chemistry. https://www.illumina.com/content/dam/illumina-marketing/documents/products/illumina_sequencing_introduction.pdf Want to see the science behind Noninvasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT)? Watch the new video: https://youtu.be/l3gOoZ60Gqo For more information on the applications and advantages of SBS technology, visit https://www.illumina.com/technology/next-generation-sequencing/sequencing-technology.html Drill down further with this Technology Spotlight on Illumina Sequencing Technology https://www.illumina.com/documents/products/techspotlights/techspotlight_sequencing.pdf Review historic milestones in the development of Illumina next-generation sequencing genetic sequencing technologies. https://www.illumina.com/technology/next-generation-sequencing/solexa-technology.html A global genomics leader, Illumina provides comprehensive next-generation sequencing solutions to the research, clinical, and applied markets. Illumina technology is responsible for generating more than 90% of the world’s sequencing data.* Through collaborative innovation, Illumina is fueling groundbreaking advancements in oncology, reproductive health, genetic disease, microbiology, agriculture, forensic science, and beyond. *Data calculations on file. Illumina, Inc., 2015. Subscribe to the Illumina video channel http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=IlluminaInc View customer spotlight videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKRu7cmBQlajfheLzgbI4S7xBn7IDbt79 View Illumina webinars https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKRu7cmBQlahpXlnrrXlQw9itVJ8yHwUZ View Illumina product videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKRu7cmBQlaj6YuZmkfxZcT9twqDgP2Xd View Illumina support videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKRu7cmBQlajbm2KGsICWb-JOnusJfYvM
Views: 554604 Illumina
Cot curve
 
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cot analysis dna - This DNA structure lecture explains about the cot curve analysis of DNA. http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 40425 Shomu's Biology
DNA Sequencing in Hindi/Urdu - 12 Class Biology #312
 
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DNA Sequencing in Hindi/Urdu - 12 Class Biology #312 Download Notes : https://goo.gl/9ynxpg - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Hello Everyone! Welcome to our channel Smart Study Education. Here You will Learn Lectures for many subjects of your academic / non academic courses including English, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Mathematics etc for classes of school, college or university and many more. These Lectures will help you to gain knowledge whether you are a Student or Teacher or Learner. All Lectures will help you throughout your life. Find us on social Networks: Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Smart-Study-Education-160845007843260 Twitter : https://www.twitter.com/smartstudyedu Google + : https://plus.google.com/116903287599774402171 Website/Blog : http://smartstudyedu.blogspot.com/ Subscribe Our Channel For More Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjivnJETneyRvJI0vAHEDWQ Like , Comment and Share video with your friends and relatives to support us. Thanks for Watching
Views: 5661 Smart Study Education
Genetic mutation | gene mutation
 
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Genetic mutation in humans explained. This lecture explains about gene mutation and chromosomal mutation in animals. gene mutations and genetic mutations are dangerous and the effect is horrifying. http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching A gene mutation is a permanent alteration in the DNA sequence that makes up a gene, such that the sequence differs from what is found in most humans. Mutations variety in dimension; they are able to have an impact on wherever from a single DNA building block (base pair) to a huge segment of a chromosome that involves more than one genes. Gene mutations can be classified in two most important approaches: Hereditary mutations are inherited from a mother or father and are present for the period of a individual’s lifestyles in practically each mobile within the body. These mutations are also referred to as germline mutations due to the fact they're present within the mum or dad’s egg or sperm cells, which might be also called germ cells. When an egg and a sperm mobilephone unite, the resulting fertilized egg telephone receives DNA from both mum and dad. If this DNA has a mutation, the youngster that grows from the fertilized egg may have the mutation in every of his or her cells. Acquired (or somatic) mutations arise at some time during a character’s lifestyles and are present handiest in specified cells, not in each telephone within the physique. These changes can also be induced by using environmental explanations corresponding to ultraviolet radiation from the solar, or can occur if a mistake is made as DNA copies itself for the period of telephone division. Acquired mutations in somatic cells (cells rather then sperm and egg cells) can't be passed on to the next iteration. Genetic changes that are described as de novo (new) mutations can be either hereditary or somatic. In some cases, the mutation occurs in a man or woman’s egg or sperm mobile but isn't present in any of the character’s other cells. In other instances, the mutation happens in the fertilized egg quickly after the egg and sperm cells unite. (it's commonly unimaginable to tell exactly when a de novo mutation happened.) because the fertilized egg divides, each and every resulting phone within the developing embryo could have the mutation. De novo mutations could provide an explanation for genetic issues wherein an affected child has a mutation in each mobilephone in the physique however the mum and dad don't, and there is not any loved ones historical past of the sickness.
Views: 111038 Shomu's Biology
NCBI Blast Tutorial
 
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http://www.biotechnology.jhu.edu/ Tutorial for BLAST, a cornerstone bioinformatics tool at NCBI. BLAST is the Basic Local Alignment Search tool and will protein and DNA sequences that are related to a sequence that the user provides.
Views: 222621 JHU AAP
Protocol 3 - Restriction Digest
 
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Enhance your genetics instruction with The Jackson Laboratory's Teaching the Genome Generation™. FULL PROTOCOL LIST BELOW⬇️️⬇️️⬇️️⬇️ Protocol 1 - DNA Extraction Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcPgdR9_t64 Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PisbDHKXTU Protocol 2 - PCR Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYpX94prb0A Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxDgPFNjkbw Protocol 3 - Restriction Digest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEjN_fxJN1s Protocol 4 - Gel Electrophoresis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK8A5OREk34 Protocol 5 - Prep for DNA Sequencing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJfed2B2Pzk Protocol 6 - DNA Sequence Analysis Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqAmkNSu3oI Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CoIjBvV274 Learn more about Teaching the Genome Generation https://www.jax.org/education-and-learning/high-school-students-and-undergraduates/teaching-the-genome-generation
DNA Sequencing: The Chain Termination Method (Sanger Method)
 
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The chain termination method of DNA sequencing. Also known as the Sanger Method. CORRECTION: Primer annealed to wrong side of strand in the video.
Views: 555889 Conor
PCR - Polymerase Chain Reaction (IQOG-CSIC)
 
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PCR technique (Polymerase Chain Reaction), Animation. It is a technique used to make multiple copies of a DNA segment of interest, generating a large amount of copies from a small initial simple. Amplification of DNA segments makes possible the detection of pathogenic virus or bacteria, identification of individuals (DNA fingerprinting), and several scientific research involving DNA manipulation. Spanish version: http://youtu.be/TalHTjA5gKU This video has been produced in the Institute of General Organic Chemistry of the CSIC (IQOG-CSIC), Spain, by Guillermo Corrales, as part of its task for promoting Science Communication and may be freely used for educational and science popularization purposes. Canal Divulgación. Divulgación científica. Instituto de Química Orgánica General (QOG) CSIC Madrid, Spain http://www.youtube.com/user/CanalDivulgacion
Views: 1930602 CanalDivulgación
Biological Sequence Analysis II (2010)
 
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January 26, 2010. Andreas Baxevanis, Ph.D. Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2010 Handout: http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Research/IntramuralResearch/DIRCalendar/CurrentTopicsinGenomeAnalysis2010/CTGA2010_Lec03_color.pdf More: http://www.genome.gov/12514286
Sequence editing in Bioedit
 
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Various sequence editing options in bioedit
Views: 86715 rsingh1980
Introduction to gene mapping (gene mapping part 1)
 
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This lecture explains about the introduction to gene mapping. http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Gene mapping, also called genome mapping, is the creation of a genetic map assigning DNA fragments to chromosomes.[1] When a genome is first investigated, this map is nonexistent. The map improves with the scientific progress and is perfect when the genomic DNA sequencing of the species has been completed. During this process, and for the investigation of differences in strain, the fragments are identified by small tags. These may be genetic markers (PCR products) or the unique sequence-dependent pattern of DNA-cutting enzymes. The ordering is derived from genetic observations (recombinant frequency) for these markers or in the second case from a computational integration of the fingerprinting data. The term "mapping" is used in two different but related contexts. Two different ways of mapping are distinguished. Genetic mapping uses classical genetic techniques (e.g. pedigree analysis or breeding experiments) to determine sequence features within a genome. Using modern molecular biology techniques for the same purpose is usually referred to as physical mapping. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 146240 Shomu's Biology
Barcode of Life
 
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In 2003, Paul Hebert, researcher at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, proposed "DNA barcoding" as a way to identify species. Barcoding uses a very short genetic sequence from a standard part of the genome the way a supermarket scanner distinguishes products using the black stripes of the Universal Product Code (UPC). Two items may look very similar to the untrained eye, but in both cases the barcodes are distinct. Until now, biological specimens were identified using morphological features like the shape, size and color of body parts. In some cases a trained technician could make routine identifications using morphological "keys" (step-by-step instructions of what to look for), but in most cases an experienced professional taxonomist is needed. If a specimen is damaged or is in an immature stage of development, even specialists may be unable to make identifications. Barcoding solves these problems because even non-specialists can obtain barcodes from tiny amounts of tissue. This is not to say that traditional taxonomy has become less important. Rather, DNA barcoding can serve a dual purpose as a new tool in the taxonomists toolbox supplementing their knowledge as well as being an innovative device for non-experts who need to make a quick identification. The gene region that is being used as the standard barcode for almost all animal groups is a 648 base-pair region in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene ("CO1"). COI is proving highly effective in identifying birds, butterflies, fish, flies and many other animal groups. COI is not an effective barcode region in plants because it evolves too slowly, but two gene regions in the chloroplast, matK and rbcL, have been approved as the barcode regions for lant plants. Barcoding projects have four components: ■The Specimens: Natural history museums, herbaria, zoos, aquaria, frozen tissue collections, seed banks, type culture collections and other repositories of biological materials are treasure troves of identified specimens. ■The Laboratory Analysis: Laboratory protocols (pdf; 400Kb) can be followed to obtain DNA barcode sequences from these specimens. The best equipped molecular biology labs can produce a DNA barcode sequence in a few hours. The data are then placed in a database for subsequent analysis. ■The Database: One of the most important components of the Barcode Initiative is the construction of a public reference library of species identifiers which could be used to assign unknown specimens to known species. There are currently two main barcode databases that fill this role: ■The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaborative is a partnership among GenBank in the U.S., the Nucleotide Sequence Database of the European Molecular Biology Lab in Europe, and the DNA Data Bank of Japan. They have agreed to CBOL's data standards (pdf; 30Kb) for barcode records. ■Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) was created and is maintained by University of Guelph in Ontario. It offers researchers a way to collect, manage, and analyze DNA barcode data. ■The Data Analysis: Specimens are identified by finding the closest matching reference record in the database. CBOL's Data Analysis Working Group has created the Barcode of Life Data Portal which offers researchers new and more flexible ways to store, manage, analyze and display their barcode data.
Views: 18898 WorldUIN
DNA 101—Genotyping and Sequencing
 
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Genotyping and sequencing are two ways of reading information from DNA, but the technology and the results you get are very different.
Views: 10163 Helix
Genome annotation
 
04:18
This lecture explains about what is genome annotation and what is the importance of gene annotation. Many organisms have had their entire genome sequenced, however this is not the end of a genome project. Annotation is the process by which pertinent information about these raw DNA sequences is added to the genome databases. This involves describing different regions of the code and identifying which regions can be called genes. The diagram below represents a tiny fragment of DNA, a single hypothetical gene. Notice that there are various parts within the gene. Some of these parts will code for a protein, others contain regulatory information, some will not be translated and their function is still unclear.One important aspect of annotation is identifying which parts of a genome are transcribed into mRNA. Obviously computer programs are essential to this process, however, human brains are often required to evaluate computer-generated gene models. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 30326 Shomu's Biology
Obtain Genomic Sequence for a Gene
 
02:25
How to get sequence for a gene region, including how to get surrounding sequence.
Views: 45890 NCBI
Gel Electrophoresis
 
08:08
Explore electrophoresis with The Amoeba Sisters! This biotechnology video introduces gel electrophoresis and how it functions to separate molecules by size. Expand video details for table of contents. 👇 Video has handout: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts. Special thanks for feedback from Dr. Brian W Davis and his team at Texas A&M University! Major Points in Video: (Example of) How Gel Electrophoresis Can Sort Molecules 1:42 Restriction Enzyme Role 3:20 Example 1: Mother and Baby Guppy Electrophoresis 4:31 Longer DNA Fragments vs. Smaller DNA Fragments 4:49 Example 2: Problem Solving with Gel Electrophoresis 5:33 DNA Ladder: 6:05 DNA Fingerprinting 7:14 Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 236596 Amoeba Sisters
2013-07-20 Sean Eddy Keynote " Biological sequence analysis in the post-data era"
 
57:11
Presented at the Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC 2014) http://www.open-bio.org/wiki/BOSC_2013_Schedule Slides at http://www.open-bio.org/bosc2013/day2/BOSC2013_Keynote_-_Sean_Eddy.pdf
Views: 336 OBF BOSC
Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies - Elaine Mardis (2010)
 
01:23:34
Tuesday, February 16, 2010. Elliott Margulies, Ph.D. Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2010 Handout: http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Research/IntramuralResearch/DIRCalendar/CurrentTopicsinGenomeAnalysis2010/CTGA2010_Lec05_color.pdf More: http://www.genome.gov/12514286
DC ISCB Workshop 2016 -  Bacterial Genome Assembly and Annotation (Jonathan Goodson)
 
01:22:20
Overview --------------- Tutorial on bacterial genome sequencing, assembly, and annotation data presented at the ISCB DC Regional Student Group Workshop at the University of Maryland - College Park (June 15 2016). Abstract -------------- In this presentation, I explain the basic overview of generating a genome sequence for a bacteria, from sequencing, through assembly, to annotation. Starting with an overview of available sequencing technologies, we cover the basics behind sequencing technologies and the two major types of genome assemblers. Finally we briefly discuss how to evaluate and annotate genome assemblies for use. Links --------- [1] Meeting site: https://iscb-dc-rsg.github.io/2016-summer-workshop/ [2] Slides: https://github.com/iscb-dc-rsg/2016-summer-workshop/raw/master/2A-Goodson-Bacterial-Genome-Assembly/ISCB%20workshop%20bacterial%20genome%20assembly.pdf
Views: 3340 Jonathan Goodson
NCBI NOW, Lecture 4, DNA-seq and Basic Variant Analysis
 
46:44
Mapping DNAseq reads to reference genomes and calling variants are core competencies in next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. In this two part lecture, Dr. Jonathan Pevsner leads a hands on tutorial for acquiring these skills. Please go to [ftp site] for accompanying documents. (Part 1 of 2).
Views: 12671 NCBI
What is Cot Curve?(B.Sc, M.sc)
 
08:35
Assistant Professor Dr. Renuka Verma, Biyani College Explained about Cot curve method and What is denaturation and renaturation of DNA Best girls college Biyani college jaipur Girls college jaipur Thanks for watching and commenting. If you like our video you can Subscribe Our Youtube Channel here https://www.youtube.com/user/gurukpobiyanicollege?sub_confirmation=1 Gurukpo.com is the fastest growing educational web portal where all kind of academic information/Notes are available free of cost. For more details visit http://www.gurukpo.com These Videos are produced by Biyani Group of Colleges Jaipur, a fastest growing girls college in India. Visit http://www.biyanicolleges.org And You can also Subscribe to our Biyani TV Channel for quality videos about Fashion Lifestyle, Current affairs and many useful topics https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC50PUq-NO3Upw7XYsjwKQrA?sub_confirmation=1 Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/3gBszC Youtube: https://goo.gl/cjbbuL Twitter: https://twitter.com/drsanjaybiyani Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BiyaniTimesNews/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/prof.sanjay.biyani/ Website : http://www.biyanitimes.com
Views: 6688 Guru Kpo
Sanger Sequencing Method (Chain Termination DNA sequencing) Explained
 
08:45
Sanger sequencing, also known as chain termination sequencing or dye termination sequencing is one of the most popular methods of DNA sequencing. It uses dideoxynucleotides, or ddNTPs, to create fragments of DNA of a certain length and a certain dye color, and uses gels to separate these fragments by length and identify the nucleotide sequence. The process was developed by Frederick Sanger in 1977 and has been used extensively since. Today, it is used in smaller scale sequencing projects and to confirm the results of next gen DNA sequencing methods.
Views: 12554 "Special" Operations
Phylogenetic tree
 
13:12
This lecture explains the construction of phylogenetic tree and properties of phylogenetic tree. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Question source - www.indiabix.com
Views: 116521 Shomu's Biology
DNA extraction from Blood
 
11:53
CPGR training video for DNA extraction from blood including workflows and protocols, highlighting instrumentation and consumables needed.
RFLP
 
02:24
This genome mapping lecture explains the process of restriction fragment length polymorphism. It also states the role of RFLP in genome mapping studies. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 202065 Shomu's Biology
PCR types
 
42:54
This PCR lecture explains about different types of PCR like nested PCR, realtime PCR, quantitative PCR, multiplex PCR, hot start PCR. It explains the principle of polymerase chain reaction techniques in details. http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Assembly PCR or Polymerase Cycling Assembly (PCA): artificial synthesis of long DNA sequences by performing PCR on a pool of long oligonucleotides with short overlapping segments. The oligonucleotides alternate between sense and antisense directions, and the overlapping segments determine the order of the PCR fragments, thereby selectively producing the final long DNA product.[23] Asymmetric PCR: preferentially amplifies one DNA strand in a double-stranded DNA template. It is used in sequencing and hybridization probing where amplification of only one of the two complementary strands is required. PCR is carried out as usual, but with a great excess of the primer for the strand targeted for amplification. Because of the slow (arithmetic) amplification later in the reaction after the limiting primer has been used up, extra cycles of PCR are required.[24] A recent modification on this process, known as Linear-After-The-Exponential-PCR (LATE-PCR), uses a limiting primer with a higher melting temperature (Tm) than the excess primer to maintain reaction efficiency as the limiting primer concentration decreases mid-reaction.[25] Dial-out PCR: a highly parallel method for retrieving accurate DNA molecules for gene synthesis. A complex library of DNA molecules is modified with unique flanking tags before massively parallel sequencing. Tag-directed primers then enable the retrieval of molecules with desired sequences by PCR.[26] Helicase-dependent amplification: similar to traditional PCR, but uses a constant temperature rather than cycling through denaturation and annealing/extension cycles. DNA helicase, an enzyme that unwinds DNA, is used in place of thermal denaturation.[27] Hot start PCR: a technique that reduces non-specific amplification during the initial set up stages of the PCR. It may be performed manually by heating the reaction components to the denaturation temperature (e.g., 95°C) before adding the polymerase.[28] Specialized enzyme systems have been developed that inhibit the polymerase's activity at ambient temperature, either by the binding of an antibody[11][29] or by the presence of covalently bound inhibitors that dissociate only after a high-temperature activation step. Hot-start/cold-finish PCR is achieved with new hybrid polymerases that are inactive at ambient temperature and are instantly activated at elongation temperature. Intersequence-specific PCR (ISSR): a PCR method for DNA fingerprinting that amplifies regions between simple sequence repeats to produce a unique fingerprint of amplified fragment lengths.[30] Inverse PCR: is commonly used to identify the flanking sequences around genomic inserts. It involves a series of DNA digestions and self ligation, resulting in known sequences at either end of the unknown sequence.[31] Multiplex-PCR: consists of multiple primer sets within a single PCR mixture to produce amplicons of varying sizes that are specific to different DNA sequences. By targeting multiple genes at once, additional information may be gained from a single test-run that otherwise would require several times the reagents and more time to perform. Annealing temperatures for each of the primer sets must be optimized to work correctly within a single reaction, and amplicon sizes. That is, their base pair length should be different enough to form distinct bands when visualized by gel electrophoresis. Nested PCR: increases the specificity of DNA amplification, by reducing background due to non-specific amplification of DNA. Two sets of primers are used in two successive PCRs. In the first reaction, one pair of primers is used to generate DNA products, which besides the intended target, may still consist of non-specifically amplified DNA fragments. The product(s) are then used in a second PCR with a set of primers whose binding sites are completely or partially different from and located 3' of each of the primers used in the first reaction. Nested PCR is often more successful in specifically amplifying long DNA fragments than conventional PCR, but it requires more detailed knowledge of the target sequences. Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 121486 Shomu's Biology
Bioinformatics Training: Sequence Manipulation Suite V2
 
05:32
- The Sequence Manipulation Suite is a collection of JavaScript programs for generating, formatting, and analyzing short DNA and protein sequences. - It is commonly used by molecular biologists, for teaching, and for program and algorithm testing. You can easily mirror the Sequence Manipulation Suite on your own web site, or you can use it off-line. This version represents a complete re-write of the previous version. This version is much faster and has new features. Send questions and comments to [email protected] To download the PDF: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320173384_Bioinformatics_Training_Sequence_Manipulation_Suit_SMS
Views: 337 Ahmed Alzohairy
Bioinformatics part 7 How to perform Global alignment 1
 
35:13
This Bioinformatics lecture explains how to perform global sequence alignment with sample example problem. Watch this video to understand the process of sequence alignment in details. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html In bioinformatics, a sequence alignment is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA, or protein to identify regions of similarity that may be a consequence of functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between the sequences. Aligned sequences of nucleotide or amino acid residues are typically represented as rows within a matrix. Gaps are inserted between the residues so that identical or similar characters are aligned in successive columns. Global alignments, which attempt to align every residue in every sequence, are most useful when the sequences in the query set are similar and of roughly equal size. (This does not mean global alignments cannot end in gaps.) A general global alignment technique is the Needleman--Wunsch algorithm, which is based on dynamic programming. Local alignments are more useful for dissimilar sequences that are suspected to contain regions of similarity or similar sequence motifs within their larger sequence context. The Smith--Waterman algorithm is a general local alignment method also based on dynamic programming. Description Article source: Wikipedia Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Credit goes to original content developers.
Views: 154155 Shomu's Biology
Using BLAST to compare DNA sequences
 
05:32
Investigation #3
Views: 276 Rahnda Ford
Genetic Markers | RAPD, RFLP, AFLP
 
11:13
This lecture on genetic markers explains about RAPD, RFLP, AFLP markers and the use of these markers in genetic fingerprinting, SNP detection and plant breeding. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of biology by sharing through all this biology lecture videos and animations presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman
Views: 167325 Shomu's Biology
Why son have looks like his father?😱 Scientific reason! Facts about DNA || in hindi || by FACT TALK
 
04:35
Why son have looks like his father? Scientific reason! To Know more about Hindu gotra system click here 👉 https://www.speakingtree.in/allslides/the-science-behind-same-gotra-marriages/248392 Pls ignore tags dna dna infotel login dna replication dna broadband dna full form dna fingerprinting dna structure dna lyrics dna ligase dna footprinting dna epaper dna test dna news dna sequencing dna zee news dna test cost dna microarray dna and rna dna as genetic material dna and rna structure dna analysis dna abbreviation dna anchor dna and rna full form dna and chromosomes dna and genes dna amplification a dna structure and function a dna and b dna a dna pdf a dna model a dna molecule a dna features a dna and z dna a dna library is a dna and cdna a dna barcode for land plants dna bts dna bts mp3 download dna bank in india dna base pairs dna bases dna based technology bill prs b dna structure b dna definition b dna z dna b dna diagram b dna wikipedia b dna and z dna difference b dna in hindi b dna helix b dna function b dna form dna copying dna contains dna computing dna chips dna charge dna chemical structure dna contact number dna components dna chords dna cloning pdf cdna library c dna synthesis c dna structure cdna cloning cdna library construction cdna library ppt cdna synthesis protocol c dna pdf cdna library diagram cdna library biology discussion dna definition dna damage dna damage and repair dna discovery dna double helix dna diagram dna definition biology dna dependent rna polymerase dna damage and repair ppt dna dependent dna polymerase de dana dan d dna definition dd national d dna structure dna entertainment dna extraction protocol dna expert dna estimation dna extraction methods dna electrophoresis dna editor dna estimation by diphenylamine method dna editing e dna newspaper e dna structure ednevnik e dna adalah dna e coli e coli dna replication e.coli dna polymerase iii function dna e rna dna e rna resumo dna e rna pdf dna fingerprinting pdf dna fitness dna function dna fingerprinting steps dna fitness janakpuri dna full form in medical dna full name f-dna2 f-dna shop dnaupd.f structure of dna f. miescher dna f factor dna function of dna f crick dna f y dna types of dna dna gyrase dna gym dna gyrase function dna genetic material dna genes dna genetic role dna gel electrophoresis dna glycosylase dna game dna gym janakpuri g-dna wash buffer g dna base g dna quadruplex g dna library gd naidu g dna tv g dna definition g dna haplogroup dna g a t c dna g news dna hybridization dna helix dna helicase dna hindi dna home test kits dna history dna hyperchromicity dna helical structure dna helix structure dna helicase function h dna structure h dna and related structures h-dna comtech h-dna entropia h-dna entropia universe nat h h dna haplogroup h dna ppt h dna pdf h dna group dna isolation dna isolation protocol dna images dna is made up of dna in hindi dna inventor dna is found in dna is present in dna isolation methods dna is acidic or basic i daniel blake movie indane gas i dance on my own i don't know dna jaipur dna janakpuri dna jokes dna journey dna jobs dna jaipur office dna japanese lyrics dna jungkook dna japanese dna jobs mumbai dna ki full form dna kendrick lamar dna ka full form dna kendrick lamar lyrics dna ka pura naam dna kya hai dna kaha paya jata hai dna ki khoj kisne ki dna kaise banta hai kdna financial services ltd kdna financial services k-dna cysec kdna financial k dnase k dna sequence dance k k&d nails dna kpop dna k shine dna live dna ladder dna library dna lyrics bts dna lab dna labs india dna live news dna length l daniel blake l daniels dna model dna methylation dna microinjection dna markers dna mp3 download dna matching dna modifying enzymes dna microarray pdf dna molecule dna newspaper owner dna nucleotides dna newspaper delhi office dna news timing dna news live today dla newspaper agra dna news channel dna newspaper contact dna nanotechnology dna or rna dna office delhi dna origami dna on zee news dna organization dna of mycoplasma dna of human dna of love movie dna fact dna facts dna facts sheet dna facts in hindi dna facts for kids dna factory dna factor dna facts quizlet dna facts biology dna factiva dna factory ltd dna facts and information dna facts bitesize dna fact sheet dna fact or fiction dna fact file dna fact in hindi fact dna replication ancestry dna fact or fiction banana dna fact dna sequencing fact sheet human dna fact fact about dna fact about dna replication fact about dna in hindi fact about dna test the dna factory the dna factor the dna facts storage in dna storage dna in water data storage in dna becomes a reality data storage in dna ppt data storage in dna pdf video storage in dna hindu gotra hindu gotra list hindu gotra name list in hindi hindu gotra list in hindi hindu gotra finder hindu gotra in telugu hindu gotra in hindi hindu gotra kashyap hindu gotra list pdf hindu gotra kaushal By FACT TALK || Fact talk || fact talk || FACTTALK || Facttalk
Views: 261 Abhishek Chaudhary
Satellite DNA | minisatellite and microsatellite
 
11:09
Satellite DNA | minisatellite and microsatellite - This video discusses about the satellite DNA and their application using sequence repeats to obtain DNA fingerprints. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 136468 Shomu's Biology
Consensus Alignment
 
01:29
Need Benchling training documentation? Check out https://benchling.com/tutorials/8/consensus-alignment. For DNA analysis tools, sign up at https://benchling.com
Views: 4871 Benchling
Lecture 4 - Sequence Assembly
 
01:15:48
This is Lecture 4 of the CSE549 (Computational Biology) course taught by Professor Steven Skiena [http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~skiena/] at Stony Brook University in 2010. The lecture slides are available at: http://www.algorithm.cs.sunysb.edu/computationalbiology/pdf/lecture4.pdf More information may be found here: http://www.algorithm.cs.sunysb.edu/computationalbiology/
Views: 3825 Steven Skiena
BLOSSOMS - Classifying Animals by Appearance Versus DNA Sequence
 
55:09
Visit the MIT BLOSSOMS website at http://blossoms.mit.edu/ Video Summary: The topic of this video module is how to classify animals based on how closely related they are. The main learning objective is that students will learn how to make phylogenetic trees based on both physical characteristics and on DNA sequence. Students will also learn why the objective and quantitative nature of DNA sequencing is preferable when it come to classifying animals based on how closely related they are. Knowledge prerequisites to this lesson include that students have some understanding of what DNA is and that they have a familiarity with the base-pairing rules and with writing a DNA sequence. However, these topics are covered briefly in the lesson. All necessary hand-outs and worksheets are downloadable in Word and PDF formats, and materials needed for the lesson are only paper and pen/pencil. The types of in-class activities for this lesson include creating phylogenetic trees, calculating pair-wise differences of the gene sequences of 10 animals, and group discussions. This learning video also includes a lesson extension for teachers and students with access to a computer and the Internet. (See Teacher Guide segment) This extension introduces teachers to free online software that will allow students to use the program written by scientists to examine the hundreds and thousands of letters of the DNA sequences of mammals, count the pair-wise differences and make phylogenetic trees. See the original video and more on MIT TechTV - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/3144
Views: 1122 mittechtv
Shotgun sequencing
 
03:19
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html In genetics, shotgun sequencing, also known as shotgun cloning, is a method used for sequencing long DNA strands. It is named by analogy with the rapidly expanding, quasi-random firing pattern of a shotgun. Since the chain termination method of DNA sequencing can only be used for fairly short strands (100 to 1000 basepairs), longer sequences must be subdivided into smaller fragments, and subsequently re-assembled to give the overall sequence. Two principal methods are used for this: chromosome walking, which progresses through the entire strand, piece by piece, and shotgun sequencing, which is a faster but more complex process, and uses random fragments. In shotgun sequencing,[1][2] DNA is broken up randomly into numerous small segments, which are sequenced using the chain termination method to obtain reads. Multiple overlapping reads for the target DNA are obtained by performing several rounds of this fragmentation and sequencing. Computer programs then use the overlapping ends of different reads to assemble them into a continuous sequence.[1] Shotgun sequencing was one of the precursor technologies that was responsible for enabling full genome sequencing. In this extremely simplified example, none of the reads cover the full length of the original sequence, but the four reads can be assembled into the original sequence using the overlap of their ends to align and order them. In reality, this process uses enormous amounts of information that are rife with ambiguities and sequencing errors. Assembly of complex genomes is additionally complicated by the great abundance of repetitive sequence, meaning similar short reads could come from completely different parts of the sequence. Many overlapping reads for each segment of the original DNA are necessary to overcome these difficulties and accurately assemble the sequence. For example, to complete the Human Genome Project, most of the human genome was sequenced at 12X or greater coverage; that is, each base in the final sequence was present, on average, in 12 reads. Even so, current methods have failed to isolate or assemble reliable sequence for approximately 1% of the (euchromatic) human genome Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 118035 Shomu's Biology
Next Gen SOLiD DNA Sequencing Method Explained
 
16:04
SOLiD sequencing is a next gen DNA sequencing method developed by Applied Biosystems. It's main advantage is that it is very cost effective and is better than other methods at detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, and insertions because of its use of 2 base encoding.
Views: 37824 "Special" Operations

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