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What is META-ANALYSIS? What does META-ANALYSIS mean? META-ANALYSIS meaning & explanation
 
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What is META-ANALYSIS? What does META-ANALYSIS mean? META-ANALYSIS meaning - META-ANALYSIS definition - META-ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The basic tenet of a meta-analysis is that there is a common truth behind all conceptually similar scientific studies, but which has been measured with a certain error within individual studies. The aim in meta-analysis then is to use approaches from statistics to derive a pooled estimate closest to the unknown common truth based on how this error is perceived. In essence, all existing methods yield a weighted average from the results of the individual studies and what differs is the manner in which these weights are allocated and also the manner in which the uncertainty is computed around the point estimate thus generated. In addition to providing an estimate of the unknown common truth, meta-analysis has the capacity to contrast results from different studies and identify patterns among study results, sources of disagreement among those results, or other interesting relationships that may come to light in the context of multiple studies. Meta-analysis can be thought of as "conducting research about previous research." Meta-analysis can only proceed if we are able to identify a common statistical measure that is shared among studies, called the effect size, which has a standard error so that we can proceed with computing a weighted average of that common measure. Such weighting usually takes into consideration the sample sizes of the individual studies, although it can also include other factors, such as study quality. A key benefit of this approach is the aggregation of information leading to a higher statistical power and more robust point estimate than is possible from the measure derived from any individual study. However, in performing a meta-analysis, an investigator must make choices many of which can affect its results, including deciding how to search for studies, selecting studies based on a set of objective criteria, dealing with incomplete data, analyzing the data, and accounting for or choosing not to account for publication bias. Meta-analyses are often, but not always, important components of a systematic review procedure. For instance, a meta-analysis may be conducted on several clinical trials of a medical treatment, in an effort to obtain a better understanding of how well the treatment works. Here it is convenient to follow the terminology used by the Cochrane Collaboration, and use "meta-analysis" to refer to statistical methods of combining evidence, leaving other aspects of 'research synthesis' or 'evidence synthesis', such as combining information from qualitative studies, for the more general context of systematic reviews.
Views: 9695 The Audiopedia
Moderator analyses: Categorical models and Meta-regression, Ryan Williams
 
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Former Managing Editor, Methods Coordinating Group Assistant Professor, Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Research, University of Memphis, USA [Recorded in Chicago/Colloquium 2013]
Multilevel analysis in educational research - Jannick Demanet, University of Ghent
 
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“Multilevel analysis in educational research. Analyzing structural school influences on student outcomes: the mediating role of student and teacher culture." Jannick Demanet, University of Ghent, Wrocław, DSW, 13.03.2015
Study: A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Interventions Aimed to Prevent Violence in Teen Dating
 
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A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Interventions Aimed to Prevent or Reduce Violence in Teen Dating Relationships Published in: Review of Education Research Online First February 18, 2016 Authors: Lisa De La Rue University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Joshua R. Polanin Vanderbilt University Dorothy Espelage University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Therese D. Pigott Loyla University Chicago
Using the WWC to Support Data Collection for Meta-Analyses
 
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Meta-analysis can be a powerful technique to examine the effects of an intervention, and how the effects vary depending on programmatic, setting, or research-specific conditions. However, collecting data for meta-analyses can be labor intensive. This webinar demonstrated how the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) makes it easy to access the data from nearly 10,000 studies of educational interventions. The webinar explained how to use information from the WWC website to obtain study-specific information that can be incorporated into a meta-analysis. Dr. Josh Polanin, of Development Services Group, and Dr. Lauren Scher, of Concentric Research and Evaluation, provided an overview of the key steps in conducting a meta-analysis and described how researchers can use WWC resources during nearly every step of the process. In particular, the webinar discussed how to export study-specific details from the WWC's individual studies database, including data on effect sizes that may not be available in published study reports. The presentation also demonstrated how to extract information from the database files and conduct a meta-analysis using R, a free statistical software package. This presentation is intended for researchers who have a general understanding of meta-analytic techniques and familiarity with the WWC website and its offerings. The content of this video does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Institute of Education Sciences or the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
An Introduction to Multilevel Meta-Analysis, by Joshua R Polanin
 
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Joshua R. Polanin's training session on Multilevel Meta Analysis, presented at the Campbell Colloquium, Belfast, Northern Ireland, June 2014
Understanding Publication Bias in Research
 
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An Excerpt from Neil O'Connell's presentation at the 2018 San Diego Pain summit discussing flaws in research, how to critically appraise papers and what should be done for it to be better. Get full access here: http://bit.ly/SDPS2018 GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX 🚨 HELP TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO 🚨 If you liked this video, help people in other countries enjoy it too by creating subtitles for it. Spread the love and impact. Here is how to do it: https://youtu.be/_3MMKHqoZrs 👉🏼 SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL 😊 : http://bit.ly/SPPRTPT 👈🏼 📚 ARTICLES: Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/web_PT Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/like_PT Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/IG_PT Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Tweet_PT Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snap_PT ------ This is not medical advice! The content is intended to be educational only for health professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. Thumbnail credit: https://www.geckoboard.com/learn/data-literacy/statistical-fallacies/publication-bias/
Views: 800 Physiotutors
Lecture 10: Independent Replicability, Meta-analysis and Pseudo-Replicability
 
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The original ganfeld psi experiment (1974). The Hyman-Honorton debate (1985). Storm et al vs Hyman (2010). "Meta-analysis that conceals more than it reveals." Parapsychology, a field without a subject matter, without replicability, but with dogged persistence. A companion course guide can be downloaded here: http://jref.swmirror.com/20730 -- More about the HOW TO THINK ABOUT DUBIOUS CLAIMS course: Smart people can act stupidly by failing to apply their intelligence wisely. This course draws lessons from scientist smart people who went astray. This course provides a framework to help you avoid their mistakes. Ray Hyman is a professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Oregon. Hyman's published research has been in such areas as pattern recognition, perception, problem solving, creativity, and related areas of cognition. He has written and published extensively on the psychology of deception and critiques of paranormal and other fringe claims. The James Randi Educational Foundation was founded in 1996 to help people defend themselves from paranormal and pseudoscientific claims. Through scholarships, workshops, and innovative resources for educators, the JREF works to inspire this investigative spirit in a new generation of critical thinkers. Learn more at http://www.randi.org.
Views: 3054 JamesRandiFoundation
A qualitative meta-synthesis - Karolina Fredriksson
 
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Have you ever wondered how to collate and synthesize qualitative research in a comprehensive and methodologically rigorous way? What are the different methodological options for different types of review questions? Have you had doubts about the appropriateness of the synthesis method used? What are the limitations of different synthesis methods? This series of presentations will try to answer some of these questions and it will provide a brief overview of various methods for synthesis of published qualitative research, including examples of reviews and examples of questions that can be answered with each method. Karolina Fredriksson (Swedish Institute for Educational Research): Experience from conducting a systematic review based on qualitative results: a qualitative meta-synthesis Questions? Contact Biljana Macura: [email protected]
Daniel Muijs, Developing a meta-analysis of whole-school improvement strategies
 
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Professor Daniel Muijs is Chair of Education at the Southampton Education School. http://www.southampton.ac.uk/education/about/staff/dm1a09.page This video is part of the University of Southampton, Southampton Education School, Digital Media Resources http://www.southampton.ac.uk/education http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~sesvideo/
Epidemiological Studies - made easy!
 
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This video gives a simple overview of the most common types of epidemiological studies, their advantages and disadvantages. These include ecological, case-series, case control, cohort and interventional studies. It also looks at systematic reviews and meta-analysis. This video was created by Ranil Appuhamy Voiceover - James Clark -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer: These videos are provided for educational purposes only. Users should not rely solely on the information contained within these videos and is not intended to be a substitute for advice from other relevant sources. The author/s do not warrant or represent that the information contained in the videos are accurate, current or complete and do not accept any legal liability or responsibility for any loss, damages, costs or expenses incurred by the use of, or reliance on, or interpretation of, the information contained in the videos.
Why Some Studies Show Vegans Are In Poor Health? Dr Garth Davis
 
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Is a vegan diet really healthy? If a plant based diet is healthy why are there studies showing that vegans and vegetarians have poor health and have increased risk of bone fractures and colon cancer? Is veganism really safe and healthy or should we be eating some animal products? Do vegans really have lower heart disease rates? Keep listening as Dr. Garth Davis answers these questions........ Original Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2irH0CMchEE&t=18s Studies; Meta-analysis https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22677895 Epic Oxford https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19279082 Heidelberg Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15824171 Health Food Shoppers Study http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/78/3/533S.abstract Comparative fracture risk in vegetarians and nonvegetarians https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17299475 Mortality in British vegetarians https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12001975 Okinawa https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17986602 Adventists https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11434797 BUY DR GARTH'S BOOK http://proteinaholic.com/ https://www.amazon.com/Proteinaholic-Obsession-Meat-Killing-About/dp/0062279319/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495354099&sr=8-1&keywords=DR+GARTH+DAVIS http://www.thedavisclinic.com/dr-garth-davis This is for educational purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Other authors I recommend are; Dr Garth Davis Dr Alan Goldhamer Dr Michael Greger Dr John McDougall Dr T. Colin Campbell Dr Neal Barnard Dr Caldwell Esselstyn Dr Doug Graham Dr Herbert Shelton Dr T C Fry Arnold Ehret Loren Lockman David Klein Norman Walker Don Bennett Dr. Robert Morse Jay Kordich Max and Charlotte Gerson Paul Bragg People Who Have Inspired Me; Dan McDonald Life Regenerator Freelee the Banana Girl Fullyraw Kristina Lou Corona
IEDP Lecture Series | Julian Christia
 
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Julian Cristia is a Lead Economist in the Research Department at the Inter-American Development Bank. His current research seeks to identify cost-effective ways of using technology to improve educational outcomes in developing countries. He has also analyzed programs that contracted out health services, expanded access to pre-primary education and introduced technology to enhance the provision of health services. His work has appeared in publications including the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Human Resources, and Journal of Industrial Economics. His research has been covered by different media including The Economist, NPR and Associated Press. Prior to joining the IDB, he worked as an Associate Analyst in the Health and Human Resources Division of the Congressional Budget Office. Cristia holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Maryland.
Views: 51 IEDPatPennGSE
Dr. Yvonna Lincoln at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
 
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Dr. Lincoln, the "Queen of Qualitative Research," delivered the afternoon keynote address at the 2016 Engaging Culture & Elevating Disciplined Inquiry conference. The conference was organized by the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership at TAMU-CC.
Qualitative Data Analysis in Education
 
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This film introduces qualitative data analysis in the educational context. By using data, teachers can utilize informed instruction. Interviews, focus groups and observations are some ways of gathering qualitative data. See more in HD at: http://sk.sagepub.com/video/qualitative-teaching-methods-in-education View more Education videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9QPQYE5oDEvwi0VRas1Mmf5HCFZoxNxt #SAGEVideo
Views: 832 SAGE Video
Why are so many of our teachers and schools so successful? John Hattie at TEDxNorrkoping
 
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Professor John Hattie, has been Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, since March 2011. He was previously Professor of Education at the University of Auckland. His research interests include performance indicators and evaluation in education, as well as creativity measurement and models of teaching and learning. He is a proponent of evidence based quantitative research methodologies on the influences on student achievement. In his talk he presents results from his research on what really matters for the student achievements. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 292573 TEDx Talks
Narrative Research   Newman & Stanley
 
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A description of "Narrative Research" for Educational Research EDU 6490. Ruth Stanley and Jean Newman
Views: 1281 Dr. Watson
Inside the Academy: Gene Glass
 
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Gene V Glass is a Research Professor in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Regents' Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University. Having made substantial contributions to education statistics and educational policy research, his work as a pioneer of meta-analysis has been recognized as one of 40 scholarly contributions that have changed psychology. As past president of the American Educational Research Association and the author of more than a dozen books and nearly two hundred scholarly articles, Dr. Glass now advocates for the expansion of open access to scholarship through free, online publications. Glass is also the founding editor of Education Policy Analysis Archives, the International Journal of Education and the Arts, and Education Review. In 2006, AERA honored Dr. Glass with the Distinguished Contributions for Educational Research award. Twice honored with the Palmer O. Johnson Award (AERA, 1968 and 1970) and a recipient of the Paul Lazarsfeld Award (1984) of the American Evaluation Association, Dr. Glass is most recently the author of the book Fertilizers, Pills, and Magnetic Strips: The Fate of Public Education in America. BlueDream Production, www.BlueDream.tv
Views: 423 insidetheacademyasu
Professor John Hattie: Why Study Clinical Teaching?
 
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Professor Hattie's work is internationally acclaimed. His influential 2008 book Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement is believed to be the world’s largest evidence-based study into the factors which improve student learning. Involving more than 80 million students from around the world and bringing together 50,000 smaller studies, the study found positive teacher-student interaction is the most important factor in effective teaching. For more information on this program, go to: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/mt9a.
Progress Beyond with TARGET PLUS
 
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TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 63 TARGETplus
Hannah Ulferts and the European meta-analysis of the effects of ECEC  on academic outcomes
 
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CARE releases report on the effects of ECEC on academic outcomes (literacy and mathematics), using data from 22 European longitudinal studies, including over 43,000 children. CARE researcher Hannah Ulferts from Freie Universität Berlin explains what was most surprising about the results. The research leading to these results, and all CARE dissemination products, received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7 – SSH2013) under grant agreement n° 613318.
Antibiotics and Risk of New Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-Analysis
 
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This webcast from the 2013 Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn's & Colitis Foundation's Clinical & Research Conference was designed to meet the educational needs of all healthcare professionals who treat and manage patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, with a focus on information shared among clinicians and researchers. Participants will gain insight from expert faculty on breakthroughs in cutting-edge research and in advancements in IBD patient care. Earn accreditation for this activity at the following location: http://elc.imedex.com/elc/activity-search.aspx?search=6985 © 2013 Imedex, LLC.
Views: 188 ImedexCME
Inside the Academy: Dr. Gene Glass
 
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GENE V GLASS is a Research Professor in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Regents' Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University. Having made substantial contributions to education statistics and educational policy research, his work as a pioneer of meta-analysis has been recognized as one of 40 scholarly contributions that have changed psychology. As past president of the American Educational Research Association and the author of more than a dozen books and nearly two hundred scholarly articles, Dr. Glass now advocates for the expansion of open access to scholarship through free, online publications. BlueDream Production, www.BlueDream.tv
Views: 163 SKYMEDIA
Ace Your Board Exam With TARGETPlus
 
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TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 229 TARGETplus
Methods for synthesis of qualitative research
 
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Have you ever wondered how to collate and synthesize qualitative research in a comprehensive and methodologically rigorous way? What are the different methodological options for different types of review questions? Have you had doubts about the appropriateness of the synthesis method used? What are the limitations of different synthesis methods? This series of presentations will try to answer some of these questions and it will provide a brief overview of various methods for synthesis of published qualitative research, including examples of reviews and examples of questions that can be answered with each method. Programme 9.15 – 9.45 Neal Haddaway (Stockholm Environment Institute): SEI experience in thematic synthesis 9.45 – 10.15 Monika Suskevics (Estonian University of Life Sciences): Social learning in natural resource management – a framework synthesis 10.15 – 10.45 Ruth Garside (University of Exeter): Introduction to realist reviews [via Skype] 10.45 – 11.00 Coffee break 11.00 – 11.30 Ruth Garside (University of Exeter): Introduction to meta-ethnography [via Skype] 11.30 – 12.00 Karolina Fredriksson (Swedish Institute for Educational Research): Experience from conducting a systematic review based on qualitative results: a qualitative meta-synthesis 12.00 – 12.30 Monica Hultcrantz and Agneta Pettersson (The Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services): SBU experience in using CERQual Questions? Contact Biljana Macura: [email protected]
Ability Based Grouping in Modern Schooling
 
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References Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2011). Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. Retrieved from http://www.aitsl.edu.au/docs/default-source/apst-resources/australian_professional_standard_for_teachers_final.pdf Barker Lunn, J.C. (1970) Streaming in the Primary School. Slough: N.F.E.R. Bergin, C., & Bergin, D. (2009). Attachment in the classroom. Educational Psychological Review, 21(2), 141–170. doi:10. 1007/s10648-009-9104-0. Birch, S. H., & Ladd, G. W. (1998). Children’s interpersonal behaviors and the teacher–child relationship. Developmental Psychology, 34(5), 934–946. doi:10.1037//0012-1649.34.5.934 Borg, W., (1965). Ability grouping in the public schools. The Journal of Experimental Education, 34, 1-9. Cottle, T. J. (1974). What tracking did to Ollie Taylor. Social Policy, 5, 21-24. Esposito, D. (1973). Homogeneous and heterogeneous ability grouping: Principal findings and implications for evaluating and designing more effective educational environments. Review of Educational Research, 43, 163-1. Findley, W. G., & Bryan, M. (1971) Ability grouping: 1970 status, impact, and alternatives. Athens: Center for Educational Improvement, University of Georgia. Furrer, C., & Skinner, E. (2003). Sense of relatedness as a factor in children’s academic engagement and performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(1), 148–162. doi:10.1037/0022- 0663.95.1.148 Goldberg, M.L., Passow, A.H. & Justman, J. (1966). The Effects of Ability Grouping. New York: New York Teachers College Press, Columbia University. Good, T., & Marshall, S. (1984). Do students learn more in heterogeneous or homogeneous groups? In P. Peterson, L. C. Wilkinson, & M. Hallinan (Eds.), The social context of instruction: Group organization and group processes (pp. 15-38). New York: Academic Press. Gregory, R. (1984). Streaming, Setting and Mixed Ability Grouping in Primary and Secondary Schools: some research findings. Educational Studies, 10(3), 209-226. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305569840100302 Hallam, S. & Ireson, J. (2003). Secondary school teachers' attitudes towards and beliefs about ability grouping. British Journal Of Educational Psychology, (73), 343-356. Hargreaves, D. (1967) Social Relations in a Secondary School. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Kulik, C. L., & Kulik, J. (1982). Effects of ability grouping on secondary school students. A meta-analysis of evaluation findings. American Educational Research Journal, 19, 415-428. Linda, G. (2016). ‘Naughty’ classes are wrong: here’s what the research says: Australian Association for Research in Education. Retrieved from http://www.aare.edu.au/blog/?p=1831 Nelson, J., Benner, G., Lane, K., & Smith, B. (2004). Academic Achievement of K-12 Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Exceptional Children, 71(1), 59-73. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/001440290407100104 Newbould, D. (1977). Ability—Grouping, The Banbury Enquiry. Slough: N.F.E.R. Newcomer, P., Barenbaum, E., & Pearson, N. (1995). Depression And Anxiety In Children And Adolescents With Learning Disabilities, Conduct Disorders, And No Disabilities. Journal Of Emotional And Behavioral Disorders, 3(1), 27-39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/106342669500300104 Palmer, P. (1997). The heart of a teacher. Change, 29(6), 14-21. Rabiner, D., & Malone, P. (2004). The Impact of Tutoring on Early Reading Achievement for Children With and Without Attention Problems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 32(3), 273-284. http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jacp.0000026141.20174.17 Raudenbush, S., Rowan, B., & Cheong, Y. (1992). Contextual Effects on the Self-perceived Efficacy of High School Teachers. Sociology Of Education, 65(2), 150. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2112680 Roorda, D. L., Koomen, H. M. Y., Spilt, J. L., & Oort, F. J. (2011). The influence of affective teacher–student relationships on students’ school engagement and achievement: A meta-analytic approach. Review of Educational Research, 81(4), 493–529. doi:10.3102/0034654311421793 Ryan, R. M., Stiller, J. D., & Lynch, J. H. (1994). Representations of relationships to teachers, parents, and friends as predictors of academic motivation and self-esteem. Journal of Early Adolescence, 14(2), 226–249. doi:10.1177/027243169401400207 Schafer, W., & Olexa, C. (1971). Tracking and opportunity: The locking-out process and beyond. Scranton, PA: Chandler Schwartz, D., & Gorman, A. H. (2011). The high price of high status: Popularity as a mechanism of risk. In A. H. N. Cillessen, D. Schwartz, & L. Mayeux (Eds.), Popularity in the peer system (pp. 245–270). New York: The Guilford Press Thompson, D. (1974). Non-streaming does make a difference, Forum, 16, 45-49. FULL REFERENCE LIST AVAILABLE AT http://wp.me/p8skua-5C
Views: 140 Laura Jansen
UST Educational Research - Analyzing Qualitative Journal Articles
 
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This mini-lecture presents an overview of qualitative journal articles and how to evaluate their quality.
Views: 645 DrCatherineBarber
CRB203   Small
 
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References Boaler, Jo, Dylan Wiliam, and Margaret Brown. "Students' Experiences Of Ability Grouping - Disaffection, Polarisation And The Construction Of Failure". British Educational Research Journal 26.5 (2000): 631-648. Web. DiMartino, Joseph and Sherri Miles. "Reaching Real Equity In Schools". Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review 70.5 (2005): 9-13. Print. Dixon, Annabelle. "Ability Streaming Can Be A Handicap To Progress". Five to Eleven 2.6 (2002): 16-17. Web. Forgasz, Helen. "Streaming For Mathematics In Years 7–10 In Victoria: An Issue Of Equity?". Mathematics Education Research Journal 22.1 (2010): 57-90. Web. Haimes, David. "Teachers’ Strategies For Implementation Of De-Streaming In Secondary Mathematics Classes". Mathematics Education Research Journal 11.2 (1999): 94-108. Web. Marklund, Sixten. "Mixed Ability Teaching Versus Streaming". Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 28.2 (1984): 101-110. Web. Kulik, C.-L. C. and J. A. Kulik. "Effects Of Ability Grouping On Secondary School Students: A Meta-Analysis Of Evaluation Findings". American Educational Research Journal 19.3 (1982): 415-428. Web. Lynn, R. et al. "STREAMING IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOL". RERE 13.2 (1971): 146-150. Web. Chaplain, R. 1996. “Pupils under pressure: coping with stress at school”. In School improvement: what can pupils tell us?, Edited by: Rudduck, J, Chaplain, R and Wallace, G. London: David Fulton. Boaler, J. 1997b. When even the winners are losers: evaluating the experiences of ‘top set’ students. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 29: 165–182.
Views: 24 Alex Miller
Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents’ duty hours – Video abstract 90568
 
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Video abstract of original research paper "Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents’ duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis" published in the open access Advances in Medical Education and Practice journal by authors Leafloor et al. Background: Since the mid-1980s, medical residents’ long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America. Methods: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service. Results: Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal/other activities from 21.5% to 17.1%. Conclusion: There was a paucity of time-motion data. There was great variability in the operational definitions of task categories reported in the studies. Implementation of the ACGME duty hour standards did not have a significant effect on the percentage of time spent in particular tasks. There are conflicting reports on how duty hour changes have affected patient safety. A low proportion of time spent in educational activities deserves further study and may point to a review of the educational models used. Read the full original research paper here: https://www.dovepress.com/time-motion-studies-of-internal-medicine-residents39-duty-hours-a-syst-peer-reviewed-article-AMEP
Views: 161 Dove Medical Press
Learner at the Center: LX Design and Research
 
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Google Tech Talk November 4, 2015 (click "show more" for more info) Presented by Lisa Maurer ABSTRACT A meta-analysis of countless studies reveals that technology alone does not enhance learning. It is the fundamental Learner Experience (LX) design principles, which when implemented well, can promote more effective and efficient learning. In this Tech Talk, we’ll draw upon a variety of sources to include evidence-based learning design principles, and usability guidelines, which are part of a comprehensive research-based approach to learning design. A set of heuristics which set the stage for making a measurable impact on learning will be presented, and the intersection between instructional design, user experience research and participatory design will be explored. Speaker Info: Lisa Maurer- Lisa has always been fascinated with the learning process, particularly within digital environments. This began during her teaching career when her use of educational technology led to startling reading growth for her students, and continued as she applied rigorous instructional design principles to the development of digital military training programs. This range of experiences has shaped her approach to managing a variety of Human Computer Interaction research activities within the Product Design Research & Efficacy Center at Pearson Education. Lisa holds a B.S. in Sociology from Northern Arizona University, Post Baccalaureate teaching certification, and a Master’s in Educational Psychology from the University of Iowa.
Views: 1736 GoogleTechTalks
DR. FRANCO EVIDENCE-BASED EDUCATION PLAN
 
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EVIDENCE-BASED EDUCATION EVIDENCE-based education is an approach to all aspects of education - from policy-making to classroom practice - where the methods used are based on SIGNIFICANT and RELIABLE EVIDENCE derived from experiments. It shares with EVIDENCE-based medicine the aim: to apply the best available EVIDENCE, gained from the scientific method, to educational decision making. EVIDENCE-based teaching refers to the teaching aspects. SOURCES OF EVIDENCE META-STUDIES OF CLASSROOM-BASED EXPERIMENTS As with the testing of new drugs, EVIDENCE-based teaching methods are derived from controlled trials. When several of these studies are compared, and their conclusions combined, we get a meta-study or meta-analysis. This is SIGNIFICANTly more RELIABLE than the results of individual studies due to the difficulty in controlling variables and individual bias. Two important sources of meta-analyses in education have been published. Visible Learning from a team in New Zealand under John Hattie Classroom Instruction that Works from a Colorado, USA team under Robert Marzano. The Best EVIDENCE Encyclopedia, from Johns Hopkins University, claims to continually evaluate educational research. However, the site frequently refers to the authors' own Success for All website which was critiqued in Jonathan Kozol's book, The Shame of the Nation, as excessively dogmatic, utilitarian, and authoritarian. According to the Marzano study, there are ten classroom methods which have been shown to work SIGNIFICANTly better than many others: • USING ANALOGIES AND SIMILES o IDENTIFYING SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES; • NOTE MAKING AND SUMMARIZING; • DEVELOPING A GROWTH MINDSET; • REPETITION AND PRACTICE; • GRAPHICAL ORGANIZERS AND METHODS; • COOPERATIVE LEARNING; • SETTING GOALS IN ADVANCE o PROVIDING FEEDBACK; • HYPOTHESIS TESTING; • ACTIVATING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE; • ADVANCE ORGANIZERS. Although Hattie's work does not exactly mirror this list, the main reason is that the New Zealand study looks at everything related to education, including family effects and changes to the curriculum, while the Colorado study looked only at classroom methods. There are, however, no incompatibilities and most of Marzano's top-ten appear high on Hattie's list. Hattie points out that there is no shortage of effective methods - almost anything you try in education seems to have a small beneficial effect. He therefore uses a scale of effect size which measures by how much the learning is improved. As an effect-size of 0.4 is the average for all interventions (and also the effect of a hard working, well organised and enthusiastic teacher), he suggests that methods with an effect size above 0.4 should be used as a priority. This ties with Marzano, whose list starts at an effect size of 0.59 for Advance Organisers and increases up the list.
Views: 151 Raöul Franco
Reading Development Module 5a: Myths About Vocabulary Instruction
 
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The following 8 modules are on the foundations of reading development. This series is appropriate for teachers and speech and language pathologists and shares considerations for those working with students that are bilingual and students with disabilities. Stephanie Downey Toledo is a bilingual speech language pathologist in New York City as well as a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has collaborated with the LEADERS project on this module series and others. Check them out on LEADERSproject.org! Explicit vocabulary instruction is a crucial component to successful reading development. Acquiring vocabulary refers to knowing the meaning of words but ALSO to understanding the meaning of the words in relationship to the passage and context. As children move from learning to decode to developing reading comprehension, vocabulary accounts for the majority of variance in reading comprehension for students. Research has demonstrated that students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are often at a disadvantage in having the academic vocabulary necessary for school. Remember that students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds include English language learners, speakers of non-standard English dialects and those from other socio-economic groups. This module examines myths persistent in vocabulary instruction and provides evidence based strategies to appropriately support vocabulary acquisition. Resources from this module: Carver, R. P. (1994). Percentage of unknown vocabulary words in text as a function of the relative difficulty of the text: Implications for instruction. Journal of Reading Behavior, 26(4), 413–437. Cunningham, A. E., & Stanovich, K. E. (1997). Early reading acquisition and its relation to reading experience and ability 10 years later. Developmental Psychology, 33(6), 934-945. Garcia, E. (1991). Education of linguistically and culturally diverse students: Effective instructional practices. Educational practice report number 1. Santa Cruz, CA and Washington, DC: National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 338 099). García, G. E., & Nagy, W. E. (1993). Latino students’ concept of cognates. In D. J. Leu & C. K. Kinzer (Eds.), Examining central issues in literacy research, theory, and practice. Chicago: National Reading Conference. Graves, M. (2000). A vocabulary program to complement and bolster a middle-grade comprehension program. In B. M. Taylor, M. F. Graves, & P. van den Broek (Eds.)., Reading for meaning: Fostering comprehension in the middle grades (pp. 116–135). Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Hart, B., & Risley, R. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes. Jiménez, R. T., García, G. E., & Pearson, P. D. (1996). The reading strategies of bilingual Latina/o students who are successful English readers: Opportunities and obstacles. Reading Research Quarterly, 31(1), 90-112. Nagy, W. (1997). On the role of context in first- and second-language vocabulary learning. In: N. SCHMITT AND M. MCCARTHY, eds. Vocabulary: description, acquisition and pedagogy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nagy, W. E., Herman, P. A. & Anderson, R. C. (1985). Learning words from context. Reading Research Quarterly, 20, 233–253. National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. (2000). Report of the National Reading Panel: Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction. (NIH Publication No. 00­4769). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Roberts, G., Torgesen, J. K., Boardman, A., & Scammacca, N. (2008). Evidence-based strategies for reading instruction of older students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 23, 63-69. Senechal, M., LeFevre, J., Thomas, E.M., & Daley, K.E. (1998). Differential effects of home literacy experiences on the development of oral and written language. Reading Research Quarterly, 33, 96-116. Shu, H., Anderson, R. C., & Zhang, Z. (1995). Incidental learning of word meanings while reading: a Chinese and American cross-cultural study. Reading Research Quarterly, 30, 76–95. Stoller, F. & W. Grabe. (1995). “New Directions in Content-Based Instruction: A Six-Ts Approach.” Paper presented at TESOL Conference, Long Beach, CA. Swanborn, M. S. L., & de Glopper, K. (1999). Incidental word learning while reading: A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 69, 261–285.
Views: 1501 LEADERSproject
Session 5A - Appraising a Quantitative Study
 
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A demonstration of using a CASP Checklist on Randomised Controlled Trials, ScHARR University of Sheffield MPH by Distance Learning
Views: 16569 Andrew Booth
Meta-analysis
 
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In statistics, meta-analysis refers to statistical methods for contrasting and combining results from different studies, in the hope of identifying patterns among study results, sources of disagreement among those results, or other interesting relationships that may come to light in the context of multiple studies. Meta analysis can be thought of as "conducting research about previous research." In its simplest form, meta-analysis is done by identifying a common statistical measure that is shared between studies, such as effect size or p-value, and calculating a weighted average of that common measure. This weighting is usually related to the sample sizes of the individual studies, although it can also include other factors, such as study quality. The motivation of a meta-analysis is to aggregate information in order to achieve a higher statistical power for your measure of interest, as opposed to a less precise measure derived from a single study. In performing a meta analysis, an investigator must make choices many that can affect its output, including deciding how to search for studies, selecting studies based on a set of objective criteria, dealing with incomplete data, analyzing the data, and accounting for or choosing not to account for publication bias. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1691 Audiopedia
MyTARGETplus
 
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TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 404 TARGETplus
In Conversation with Finnish education guru Pasi Sahlberg
 
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Pasi Sahlberg and John Hattie: two of the world's leading education experts on how Australia can learn from others and improve its educational outcomes. Pasi Sahlberg is Director General of the Centre for International Mobility and Cooperation (CIMO) in the Ministry of Education in Finland. He has worked as a teacher, teacher-educator, policy advisor and director, and for the World Bank and European Commission. Professor John Hattie is director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne's Graduate School of Education. His influential 2008 book Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement is believed to be the world's largest evidence-based study into the factors which improve student learning. Produced by Melbourne University - Digital Media Solutions Mike Wilkins - Camera & Post Production Gillian McTigue - Camera Jeremy Shaw - Audio
The New Statistics: Research Integrity & the New Statistics (Workshop Part 2)
 
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Featuring Geoff Cumming La Trobe University, Australia Leading scholars in psychology and other disciplines are striving to help scientists enhance the way they conduct, analyze, and report their research. They advocate the use of “the new statistics,”— effect sizes, confidence intervals, and meta-analysis. APS’ flagship journal, Psychological Science, has been inviting authors to use the “new statistics” as part of a comprehensive effort to enhance research methodology. In this workshop, Geoff Cumming, a leading expert in new statistics, explains why all these changes are necessary, and suggests how psychological scientists can implement them. The workshop was recorded at the 2014 APS Annual Convention in San Francisco, and is presented here as six video segments. It makes extensive use of interactive simulations to illustrate concepts, and provides a wealth of practical guidance. Part 2 Includes: • The replicability crisis in many scientific disciplines • The over-reliance on p = .05 as an underlying cause of the replicability problem • Solutions being developed to enhance research integrity, including: • pre-registration of studies • full reporting of all procedures and data • encouragement of replication • The need for open science.
Views: 6500 PsychologicalScience
Target Plus Principals Say
 
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TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 52 TARGETplus
Debra McKeown Biography SRSD Writing To Learn
 
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https://SRSDonline.org SRSD Writing To Learn Debra McKeown is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders. McKeown’s research interests include teacher preparation/quality and effective instructional practices, especially in writing. McKeown works in single-subject, quantitative and qualitative methodologies, often using mixed methods to answer research questions. She is published in the top journals in her field and is Associate Editor for Journal of Early Intervention. Currently, McKeown is running two intervention research projects in school settings, a survey project, and a meta-analysis project. Prior to joining academia, McKeown was a teacher of special education for ten years in the Southern US, Kenya, and Thailand. McKeown specializes in writing, SRSD (Self-regulated strategy development), teacher professional development models, special education teacher quality, mixed methods, single-subject design, qualitative methodology. Specialties: Learning Disabilities, Mild-Moderate/High Incidence Disabilities, Special Education teacher quality, Research Methodology, Writing interventions, Single-subject research design, Qualitative research, mixed methodology, Compounding issues associated with gender, SES, ESL, culture Publications https://www.questia.com/library/journal/1P3-3612788001/srsd-in-practice-creating-a-professional-development Steinbrecher, T., McKeown, D., & Walther-Thomas, C. (2013). Comparing validity and reliability in special education Title II and IDEA data. Exceptional Children, 79,3 (Spring). Graham, S., Gillespie, A., & McKeown, D. (guest co-editors) (2013, Jan.). Introduction to the special edition. Reading & Writing: An Interdisciplinary Journal,26(1). Graham, S., Harris, K.R., & McKeown, D. (2013). The writing of students with LD and a meta-analysis of SRSD writing intervention studies: Redux. In L. Swanson, K.R. Harris, & S. Graham (Eds.), Handbook of Learning Disabilities (2nd Edition). MY: Guilford Press. Graham, S., McKeown, D., Kiuhara, S., & Harris, K. R. (2012, Nov). A meta-analysis of writing instruction for students in the elementary grades. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104(4), 879-896. doi: 10.1037/a0029185 Geiger, W., Michelson, A. M., McKeown, D., Barton, J., Kleinhammer-Trammill, & Steinbrecher, T., (in press). Patterns of special education teacher licensure. An invited chapter for Handbook of Research on Special Education Teacher Preparation. Sindelar, P.S., McCray, E. D., Brownell, M. T., Lignugaris/Kraft, B. Eds.). New York: Routledge, Taylor, & Francis. Education Ph.D. in special education, Vanderbilt University M.A. in anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong M.A., special education, University of South Florida B.A. in anthropology,University of South Florida
Views: 45 SRSD Online
Reading Development Module 5b: The Role of the SLP in Vocabulary Instruction
 
11:45
The following 8 modules are on the foundations of reading development. This series is appropriate for teachers and speech and language pathologists and shares considerations for those working with students that are bilingual and students with disabilities. Stephanie Downey Toledo is a bilingual speech language pathologist in New York City as well as a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has collaborated with the LEADERS project on this module series and others. Check them out on LEADERSproject.org! Explicit vocabulary instruction is a crucial component to successful reading development. Acquiring vocabulary refers to knowing the meaning of words but ALSO to understanding the meaning of the words in relationship to the passage and context. As children move from learning to decode to developing reading comprehension, vocabulary accounts for the majority of variance in reading comprehension for students. Research has demonstrated that students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are often at a disadvantage in having the academic vocabulary necessary for school. Remember that students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds include English language learners, speakers of non-standard English dialects and those from other socio-economic groups. Some think that the SLP does not have a role in literacy instruction, that this is the role of the reading teacher. However, this module explains why the SLP is a key part of evidence based literacy development. Resources from this module: Carver, R. P. (1994). Percentage of unknown vocabulary words in text as a function of the relative difficulty of the text: Implications for instruction. Journal of Reading Behavior, 26(4), 413–437. Cunningham, A. E., & Stanovich, K. E. (1997). Early reading acquisition and its relation to reading experience and ability 10 years later. Developmental Psychology, 33(6), 934-945. Garcia, E. (1991). Education of linguistically and culturally diverse students: Effective instructional practices. Educational practice report number 1. Santa Cruz, CA and Washington, DC: National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 338 099). García, G. E., & Nagy, W. E. (1993). Latino students’ concept of cognates. In D. J. Leu & C. K. Kinzer (Eds.), Examining central issues in literacy research, theory, and practice. Chicago: National Reading Conference. Graves, M. (2000). A vocabulary program to complement and bolster a middle-grade comprehension program. In B. M. Taylor, M. F. Graves, & P. van den Broek (Eds.)., Reading for meaning: Fostering comprehension in the middle grades (pp. 116–135). Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Hart, B., & Risley, R. T. (1995). Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes. Jiménez, R. T., García, G. E., & Pearson, P. D. (1996). The reading strategies of bilingual Latina/o students who are successful English readers: Opportunities and obstacles. Reading Research Quarterly, 31(1), 90-112. Nagy, W. (1997). On the role of context in first- and second-language vocabulary learning. In: N. SCHMITT AND M. MCCARTHY, eds. Vocabulary: description, acquisition and pedagogy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nagy, W. E., Herman, P. A. & Anderson, R. C. (1985). Learning words from context. Reading Research Quarterly, 20, 233–253. National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. (2000). Report of the National Reading Panel: Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction. (NIH Publication No. 00­4769). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Roberts, G., Torgesen, J. K., Boardman, A., & Scammacca, N. (2008). Evidence-based strategies for reading instruction of older students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 23, 63-69. Senechal, M., LeFevre, J., Thomas, E.M., & Daley, K.E. (1998). Differential effects of home literacy experiences on the development of oral and written language. Reading Research Quarterly, 33, 96-116. Shu, H., Anderson, R. C., & Zhang, Z. (1995). Incidental learning of word meanings while reading: a Chinese and American cross-cultural study. Reading Research Quarterly, 30, 76–95 Stoller, F. & W. Grabe. (1995). “New Directions in Content-Based Instruction: A Six-Ts Approach.” Paper presented at TESOL Conference, Long Beach, CA. Swanborn, M. S. L., & de Glopper, K. (1999). Incidental word learning while reading: A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 69, 261–285
Views: 1290 LEADERSproject
Teaching Studies: Assessment 2 MMU
 
03:19
'How do ability groups affect children's sense of inclusion?' Posted and created by Michelle Mannion Sarah Beattie Hafsa Zahid Caoimhe Garland All assets are created and used under appropriate copyright and sharing licenses. References Gamoran, A. & Nystrand, M. (1995) ‘An Organisational Analysis of the Effects of Ability Grouping’. American Educational Research Journal. 32(4) pp 687-715. Hargreaves, D. (2001) Social Relations in a Secondary School. Oxfordshire: Routledge and Kegan Paul. Ireson, J. & Hallam, S. (2001) Ability grouping in education. London: Sage. Kulik, J. A. & Kulik, C-L. C. (1992) ‘Meta-analytic findings on grouping programs’ Gifted Child Quaterly. 36(2) pp 73-77. Lacey, C. (1974) ‘Destreaming in a ‘pressured’ academic environment’ In: J Eggleston (ed.) Contemporary Research in the sociology of Education. London: Methuen. Wertsch, J.V. (2008) ‘From Social Interaction to Higher Psychological Processes’. Human Development. 51(1) pp 66-79. Copyright Information for Footage and Audio All original footage filmed by the project group News jingle © Apple Busy high street footage © Shutterstock Four photographs of Tommy © Shutterstock Children hoola-hooping and white board stock footage © Coverr Child reading, stationary, work book photography © UnSplash All fair use music assets © Apple
Views: 111 Caoimhe Garland
Visible Learning Inside
 
27:03
Introduction to week 6 concepts of Effect Size and Meta-Analysis
Views: 1035 Michael Welch
MyTARGETplus
 
21:02
TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 304 TARGETplus
Compete with Yourself!
 
02:03
TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 86 TARGETplus
2010 Texas Tech Integrated Scholar Hansel Burley
 
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Hansel Burley - Education If you review Hansel Burley's record, you might find it difficult to determine where the elements of teaching, research, and service begin and end, because they are so tightly woven. Professor Burley's scholarly pursuits span the practical to the theoretical, from studies of developmental (some say remedial) education to diversity (particularly the success of African American students in higher education) to the concept and application of semantics in World Wide Web programs and learning. The scholarship guides his teaching (e.g., cultural foundations of education, introduction to education statistics, meta-analysis of education research) and informs his service roles—whether through his outreach to College of Education faculty members (through his contributions as associate dean), contributions to the American Educational Research Association and the Traditionally Black Colleges and Universities Association for Institutional Research (wherein he is president), or notable other campus and off-campus causes. Thus, he has become a prime example of an integrated scholar.
Views: 405 TTU Research
MyTARGETplus
 
00:30
TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 375 TARGETplus
What is Meta Analysis   Definition Meaning Explained  Teacher Education Terms | Usman Information
 
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What is Meta Analysis Definition Meaning Explained Teacher Education Terms | Usman Information Watch the video to learn about what is Meta Analysis and Meta Analysis definition, meaning and importance explained in a simple and easy way useful for teacher education, B ed. education and teaching skill development. Also useful for kids, students and children interested in exploring education terms and concepts. ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● My YouTube Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDbDgGVyL4hpo6ZuUQ8SPYQ/featured FB linker:http://www.fblinker.com ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● Find me on Social Media Twitter:https://twitter.com/usman01896 Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/tricksusman/ My Visit blogger:https://usmaninformationtechnologys1.blogspot.com/ Website:http://localhost/wordpress/ Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100023875894700 Like my Page:https://www.facebook.com/Usman-Tricks-1954223571502979/?ref=settings Join my Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/2001925306716822/?source=create_flow Google Plus:https://plus.google.com/u/0/ ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● DISCLAIMER: This Channel DOES NOT Promote or encourage Any illegal activities , all contents provided by This Channel is meant for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE only . Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. Subscribe for free technology advice, daily tech video updates Thanks M.Usman
Introduction to reviewing and synthesizing qualitative evidence
 
59:09
Qualitative Research Synthesis: Session 1. In this session, Karin Hannes, PhD, from the Methodology of Educational Sciences Research Group at KU Leuven, Belgium, introduces general concepts of evidence produced by qualitative research. The focus of this webinar is to define the general idea of a qualitative evidence review and the difference from a traditional quantitative review. For more information, please visit http://www.ktdrr.org/training/workshops/qual/session1/index.html
Views: 2560 KTDRR and KTER
MyTARGETplus
 
00:41
TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 418 TARGETplus
Target Plus Interview ICSE 2018
 
04:39
TARGETPlus is a education services organisation with focus on progress and preparation of students for the Boards and beyond. TARGETplus uses targeted interventions that save time and improve results. Improvement is not left to chance but evidence is collected throughout the processes used by the students and teachers. It is an intelligent system, an assessment for, as, and of learning, and a personalised learning program that guarantees results. Built on the principle of “Compete with Yourself”, it helps learners identify their learning gaps OBJECTIVELY and learn from their mistakes. TARGETplus is time-efficient and cost-effective solution for high performance in the Board Examinations and beyond. TARGETplus Mocks were first implemented for students of City Montessori School as online mocks at the end of December, 2004. They have been refined and improved since then. In November 2005, Dr Gandhi decided to do a research study of the Mocks in a new version. In this study, TARGETplus was given to roughly half the students in all decile groups (treatment group), and the other half in the same decile groups did not participate in TARGETplus (control group). The Board results in the Boards 2016 were then compared for all students in the treatment and control groups. Dr. Sunita Gandhi, PhD Cambridge University, UK, concetualized and developed TARGETplus based on her experience of going from being a ‘below average’ student in her school years, to qualifying for the toughest scholarships at Cambridge University: Trinity College Scholarship, The Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, The Overseas Student Award. She has developed this pedagogy through research and pilots over the last 17 years. She has fine-tuned the assessment, reports and interventions through rigorous work and research in over 3 counties: Iceland, United Kingdom and India. She believes: “We must have our ‘hunches’ but we must not prescribe to them till we have our ‘evidence’.” Besides creating her own evidence, her work is consistent with worldwide research and evidence as per John Hattie’s world’s largest meta analysis of educational research. The company has head-quarters in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, and has regional offices in Hyderabad and Bangalore. Overseas, it has offices in Singapore, UAE and the UK.
Views: 90 TARGETplus

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