Home
Search results “Oxygen molecule bonds”
Covalent Bonding of Hydrogen, Oxygen & Nitrogen | Chemistry for All | The Fuse School
 
03:25
Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as a part of the overall topic of properties of matter. The noble gas structure and covalent bonding is also discussed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Molecular Orbital (MO) Diagram of O2
 
03:38
Molecular Orbital Diagram for Oxygen Gas (O2). Fill from the bottom up, with 12 electrons total. Bonding Order is 2, and it is Paramagnetic. sigma2s(2),sigma2s*(2),sigma2p(2),pi2p(4),pi2p*(2) Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 97386 chemistNATE
FORMATION OF OXYGEN AND NITROGEN MOLECULE ! LEARN AND GROW
 
06:55
On this channel you can get education and knowledge for general issues and topics
Views: 4718 LEARN AND GROW
O2 Lewis Structure: How to Draw the Lewis Structure for Oxygen Gas (Dioxygen)
 
01:48
A step-by-step explanation of how to draw the Lewis Structure Oxygen Gas (Dioxygen). For the O2 Lewis structure, calculate the total number of valence electrons for the O2 molecule. After determining how many valence electrons there are in O2, place them around the central atom to complete the octets. Be sure to use the number of available valence electrons you found earlier. In order to make sure the outer shell of the Oxygen atoms are full you will need to form a double bond in this Lewis structure. By doing so each of the Oxygen atom in the Lewis structure for O2 will have octets. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding/
Views: 142260 Wayne Breslyn
Chemistry - Molecular Structure (29 of 45) Pi Bond - Example
 
03:41
Visit http://ilectureonline.com for more math and science lectures! In this video I will explain the Pi bond of the molecule oxygen, O2.
Views: 1790 Michel van Biezen
Orbital Hybridization of Oxygen - Mr. Causey's Chemistry
 
03:05
Orbital Hybridization of oxygen. Mr. Causey explains the orbital hybridization of oxygen. He shows you step by step from configuration to Lewis dot symbol to orbitals. http://www.mrcausey.com SUBSCRIBE for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl ABOUT MR. CAUSEY'S VIDEO ACADEMY Mr. Causey's Video Academy is an educational video series of short video lessons for chemistry, algebra and physics. You can get lessons on a variety of topics or homework helpers that show you how to solve certain problems. CONTACT ME: [email protected] FOLLOW ME: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544 https://plus.google.com/u/0/111105504415887392612 RESOURCES: Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 RELATED VIDEOS: Molecular Geometry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pq2wum1uDc Hybridization: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDREeV9nLEo Electron Configuration: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xHRV48oC80
Views: 15431 Mr. Causey
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
02:40
Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
17:51
This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 123335 AtomicSchool
Oxygen (O2) animated video
 
02:19
animation of Oxygen molecule.
Views: 4951 Khaled Selwaiea
Lewis Structure of O2
 
03:13
How to draw the Lewis Structure of Oxygen Gas - with explanation! Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 48925 chemistNATE
Oxygen covalent bonding
 
00:39
Slowmation illustrating the principles of intramolecular O2 covalent bonding.
Views: 295 Daniel Czech
FORMATION OF OXYGEN MOLECULE
 
01:17
FORMATION OF OXYGEN MOLECULE
Views: 100 lalitha parayatham
Formation of O2 molecule
 
10:00
Chemistry_c-9-10-che-bon-54.mp4
Views: 2519 Sabaq. Pk
MO Diagram for O2(2-)
 
02:55
It is sigma2s(2)sigma2s*(2)sigma2p(2)pi2p(4)pi2p*(4) Bond order 1. It is stable. In fact, it's the perioxide ion. Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 35726 chemistNATE
Molecular orbital Energy level diagram of Nitrogen,oxygen
 
07:59
This video give about what is energy level diagram We take examples of N,O,CO,NO..
Views: 101164 BEST CLASSES
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
03:54
Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Double Covalent Bond Formation in Oxygen | Chemistry | Grade 10
 
00:47
Double Covalent Bond Formation in Oxygen | Chemistry | Grade 10 Watch our other videos: English Stories for Kids: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1df0pCmadfRHdJ4Q1IYX58jTNFJL60o Double Covalent Bond Formation in Oxygen | Chemistry | Grade 10English Poems for Kids: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1df0pCmadfdUZWKOgzL_tvEE9gnrO8_ English Grammar for Kids: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1df0pCmadeOXsk1AGM6TgMrIkxLQIGP Hindi Stories: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1df0pCmade3ewXfVcrIdo0os76Epk1d Science Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1df0pCmadfv-D3JU1DiacOsAUhgWGwr For more such videos on English Stories, English Grammar, English Stories, Poem & Rhymes, Hindi Stories and Poems, Maths, Environmental Studies and Science @ https://www.youtube.com/PeriwinkleKids Don't forget to subscribe! Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PeriwinkleKids/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Periwinkle_Kids Follow us on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+PeriwinkleKids Website: http://www.e-periwinkle.in/
Views: 70 Periwinkle
Covalent Bonding   Oxygen Gas
 
04:57
Double covalent bonding - Oxygen gas
Views: 4156 Alex Chin
Molecular Orbital Diagram of Oxygen Molecule - Nature of Chemical Bond - Chemistry Class 11
 
13:50
Molecular Orbital Diagram of Oxygen Molecule Video Lecture from Chapter Nature of Chemical Bond of Subject Chemistry Class 11 for HSC, IIT JEE, CBSE & NEET. Watch Previous Videos of Chapter Nature of Chemical Bond:- 1) Molecular Orbital Diagram of Lithium Molecule - Nature of Chemical Bond - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/Jch40zLKW3E 2) Molecular Orbital Diagram of Beryllium Molecule - Nature of Chemical Bond - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/s1CK-LfhEic Watch Next Videos of Chapter Nature of Chemical Bond:- 1) Molecular Orbital Diagram of Fluorine Molecule - Nature of Chemical Bond - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/V2ylkSY35PI 2) Molecular Orbital Diagram of Neon Molecule - Nature of Chemical Bond - Chemistry Class 11 - https://youtu.be/wMTeAU-7YJw Access the Complete Playlist of Chapter Nature of Chemical Bond:- http://gg.gg/Nature-of-Chemical-Bond Access the Complete Playlist of Chemistry Class 11:- http://gg.gg/Chemistry-Class-11 Subscribe to Ekeeda Channel to access more videos:- http://gg.gg/Subscribe-Now #NatureofChemicalBond #ChemistryClass11 #ChemistryClass11JEE #ChemistryClass11Lectures #ChemistryClass11Tutorial #OnlineVideoLectures #EkeedaOnlineLectures #EkeedaVideoLectures #EkeedaVideoTutorial Nature of Chemical Bond Chemistry Class 11 Nature of Chemical Bond Class 11 Chemistry Class 11 Nature of Chemical Bond 11 Chemistry Nature of Chemical Bond Nature of Chemical Bond 11th Std Class 11 Nature of Chemical Bond Class 11 Chemistry Chemistry for Class 11 Thanks For Watching. You can follow and Like us on following social media. Website - http://ekeeda.com Parent Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/ekeeda Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ekeeda Twitter - https://twitter.com/Ekeeda_Video LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/13222723/ Instgram - https://www.instagram.com/ekeeda_/ Pinterest - https://in.pinterest.com/ekeedavideo You can reach us on [email protected] Happy Learning : )
Views: 101 Ekeeda
Why is water a polar molecule and a bent shape? High school chemistry
 
02:47
This video of water molecule is a revised version of the earlier video "Why is water a polar molecule". https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=6w9t20p51uc This version explains both the polar covalent bond and the bent shape of the molecule - which are the reasons for the polarity in water. =============== explaination ===========--- The water molecule is a polar molecule due to the (1) unequal sharing of electrons in the bonds and also the (2) bent shape of the molecule. ***** The shape of the molecule is an important factor why water is polar. If the bond angle is set to 180º (linear shape), the whole molecule will be non-polar. But the shape of water molecule is BENT with an angle of about 105°, so the forces are distributed unequally and the forces cannot cancel out ******** (Please note that this video is created to help you visualize the concept of why water is a polar molecule. It does not represent how electrons actually travel - please read Heisenberg's Uncertainty Theory. Also, the shape of a water molecule is a tetrahedral geometry and you have to visualize in 3d how the bonds are formed.) Why is water a polar molecule? Water is a polar molecule because one side is positively charged and one side is negatively charged. Oxygen has 6 valence electrons and hydrogen has 1. Oxygen combines with 2 hydrogens in order to make 1 water molecule. Thus, oxygen would have 8 valence electrons as a result of the bonding and hydrogen would have 2. The water molecule fulfills the octet rule. However, oxygen attracts electrons more strongly than hydrogen. This causes the electrons to move closer to oxygen. Because of this, the oxygen ends up having a slightly negative charge and the hydrogen atom ends up with a slightly positive charge. A water molecular has a polar covalent bond. This is called a separation of charges, one end of the molecule is slightly negatively charged and the other end is slightly positively charged. Polarity means having electricity charge and that's why the water molecular is said to be a polar molecule. chemistry, molecules, polar covalent bonds, visual learning, visual science, high school, college chemistry refresher, water molecule Website: https://viziscience.com ©Copyright Meerwebs LLC, Viziscience.com Chemistry concept videos for high school & secondary school students
Views: 4684 Viziscience
Molecular Orbital diagram for the molecule, oxygen, O2.
 
16:38
This video shows the construction of a molecular orbital (MO) diagram for the diatomic molecule, O2, using the valence electrons of each oxygen. The diagram consists of only the 2S and 2P atomic orbitals (valence shell) on each oxygen atom. Each pair of atomic orbitals used will create a Molecular Orbital: one lower in Energy (than the atomic orbitals), which is a Bonding Orbital, and stabilizes the molecule, and one higher in Energy, which is an Anti-bonding Orbital, and destabilizes the molecule. Oxygen's paramagnetism (unpaired electrons) is seen the MO diagram. FYI: I use the x axis as the horizontal axis (because I've always done that - it's what I call the number line), so my p orbital designation may vary from a textbook or another instructional video. The labeling of each axis is arbitrary and is of no consequence, except to keep each p orbital overlap consistent with each other in the diagram.
Views: 64167 Michele Berkey
Is O2 Polar or Non-polar?  (Oxygen Gas)
 
00:47
Learn to determine if O2 is polar or nonpolar based on the Lewis Structure and the molecular geometry (shape). We start with the Lewis Structure and then use VSEPR to determine the shape of the molecule. After that we’ll look at how the shape of the molecule, based on VSEPR, allows us to determine if the entire molecule is polar or nonpolar. If you look at the Lewis Structure for O2 it appears to be a symmetrical molecule. However, to determine if O2 is polar we consider the molecular geometry. A polar molecule results from an unequal/unsymmetrical sharing of valence electrons. While there may be unequal sharing of electrons in the individual bonds, in a nonpolar molecule like O2 these bonds are evenly distributed and cancel out. There is no net dipole and the O2 is non-polar. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding/ Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo). Molecular Shapes done with PhET's free online website: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/molecule-shapes/latest/molecule-shapes_en.html
Views: 956 Wayne Breslyn
Sigma & pi-bonds in Fluorine,Nitrogen & Oxygen - Dr.Amal K Kumar
 
05:20
A fine detailed animation of the sigma- & pi-bond formations in gaseous diatomic molecules like Hydrogen,Nitrogen,Oxygen & Fluorine are shown to strengthen the conceptual framework of the high school students.
Views: 18057 Dr. Amal K Kumar
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
07:21
Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 120099 AtomicSchool
Easiest way to find BOND ORDER
 
06:05
Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/?hl=en Friends do follow me on Instagram and you can ask any doubts if you have any :)
Views: 136761 Easy Minds
How to Draw Covalent Bonding Molecules
 
09:17
http://www.sciencetutorial4u.com This video explains how to draw covalent molecules and compounds. Contents: 0:08 Introduction 0:39 H2 1:25 HCl 2:23 Cl2 3:18 CH4 4:27 NH3 5:37 H2O 6:52 O2 7:57 N2 Thank you for watching. Please like, subscribe and share this video: https://youtu.be/_v8C1W0ChVM INTRODUCTION 0:08 Covalent bonding happens between non-metals. The electrons are shared between the non-metal atoms. This bonding allow atoms to have full outer shell of electrons. Only the electrons in the outer shell take part in the bonding. The number of electrons in the outer shell can be found out using the group in the periodic table. H2 0:39 Hydrogen is in group 1 so it has one electron in the outer shell. Hydrogen molecules have single bond which means they have two electrons in the overlap. HCl 1:25 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. HCl has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. Cl2 2:23 Chlorine is in group 7 so it has seven electrons in the outer shell. Cl2 (Chlorine molecule) has single bond so it has two electrons in the overlap. CH4 3:18 Carbon is in group 4 so it has four electrons in the outer shell. Methane has four single bonds. NH3 4:27 Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. The Nitrogen atom is surrounded by three Hydrogen atoms, each providing one electron in the sharing (overlap). So Ammonia has 3 single bonds. H2O 5:37 Oxygen is found in group 6 so it has 6 electrons in the outer shell. Water has 2 single bonds. O2 6:52 Oxygen molecules have double bonds. Oxygen atom is found in group 6 so it has 6 electron in the outer shell. Therefore, in the overlap there are 2 pairs of electrons (which is 4 electrons in the overlap). This leads O2 molecules to have one double bond. N2 7:57 Nitrogen molecules have triple bonds. Nitrogen is found in group 5 so it has 5 electrons in the outer-shell. In the overlap, there are 3 pairs of electrons which are 6 electrons in the overlap. This causes Nitrogen molecules to have one triple bond. How to draw Ionic Bonds Teaching Video: https://youtu.be/ek-AN5K3AlI Ionic and Covalent bonds Teaching video: https://youtu.be/wQ3NJUKKcTU How to draw electron shell Teaching video: https://youtu.be/vuVNkQwSggo
Views: 55686 sciencetutorial4u
Molecular Orbital Theory VI: Paramagnetism and Diamagnetism
 
06:00
Lesson on how MO theory is used to predict the magnetic properties of certain substances. A substance is paramagnetic (attracted to a magnetic field) if it contains unpaired electrons. A substance is diamagnetic (repelled by a magnetic field) if it lacks unpaired electrons.
Views: 237002 Ben's Chem Videos
Journey of an Oxygen Molecule
 
02:47
- created at http://animoto.com
Views: 4775 AllyOchs17
PGC lectures : Formation of O2 Molecule
 
11:57
PGC lectures : Chapter # 6 Formation of CaO Part # 37 38 Topics Formation of CaO Formation of O2 Molecule Chemistry F.Sc I
Views: 2360 Online Learners
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
06:11
Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1229285 It's AumSum Time
how to separate hydrogen and oxygen from water!!
 
04:38
i show you guys and girls how to separate hydrogen and oxygen from water!!! SUBSCRIBE!!!
Views: 148889 tutorials1028
Chemistry Tutorial: How to Balance Chemical Equations?
 
09:36
This chemistry tutorial video shows five steps to balance chemical equations. It uses the examples of three combustion chemical reactions- the burning of hydrogen, the burning of carbon and the burning of methane in oxygen. A challenge is also set to balance the equation for the combustion of propane, with clues given to help solve the challenge. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's try a different chemical reaction. Methane gas also explodes in oxygen gas, and you can see if we put one CH4 molecule and one O2 molecule into a box, we end up with two H2O molecules, but one C atom is left on its own with unused bonds. Let's put another O2 molecule in at the beginning. Boom! Yes, that's better, we now have product molecules with no unused bonds left over. Could we work these numbers out in advance without having to do the explosion? Methane is a compound that contains both hydrogen and carbon atoms. When the molecules bust apart, both the hydrogen and the carbon atoms get attached to oxygen atoms, to form new molecules. We know that when hydrogen bonds to oxygen, we get H2O, water. But what about when carbon attaches to oxygen? What is the molecules that we end up with then? If we bond one oxygen to one carbon, we can see that a double bond could form between carbon and oxygen atoms. But carbon still has 2 unused bonds, so we need another oxygen atom. We end up with the formula CO2, carbon dioxide. Whenever oxygen reacts with carbon, or compounds containing carbon, CO2 is the usual product. You can remember that. Let's write then balance the equation. First we can write the names of the reactants, methane and oxygen. Then we can write the names of the products, water and carbon dioxide. Then convert the names into formulas. Some formulas you will already know, and others you might be able to work out using the bonding rules. Methane is CH4, oxygen gas is O2, water is H2O and carbon dioxide is CO2. Carbon is already balanced, but hydrogen and oxygen are not. There are 4 H atoms on the LHS and only 2 on the RHS. What to do? We can double the number of H2O molecules
Views: 18109 AtomicSchool
Chemical Bonding looks at the double covalent bond forming in Oxygen.
 
00:31
Highly Recommended - Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry This brief flash video outlines what happens when two oxygen atoms form a molecule with a double covalent bond.
Views: 2496 FranklyChemistry
CHEM-XI-4-08 Molecular orbital theory (2017) Pradeep Kshetrapal Physics channel
 
40:39
Chemistry, Class XI Chapter: Chemical bonding and molecular structure Topic: Molecular orbital theory Classroom lecture by Shaillee Kaushal. Language : English mixed with Hindi.
Views: 65266 Pradeep Kshetrapal
Molecular Orbital Diagrams: Oxygen and Fluorine
 
05:37
In this video we will draw the molecular orbital diagrams for diatomic fluorine and oxygen. We will also calculate their bond order and determine if they are paramagnetic or diamagnetic. Fluorine and oxygen have a slightly different order of energies in their molecular orbital diagrams compared to nitrogen, boron, and carbon. For oxygen and fluorine, the two sigma orbital is lower in energy that the 1 pi orbital. In nitrogen, boron, and carbon, however, the two sigma orbital is higher in energy than the 1 pi orbital. To learn how to write the molecular orbital diagram for nitrogen, carbon and boron, see this video: https://youtu.be/eyebbF8x4Po For an introduction to molecular orbitals see the following video "What is a molecular orbital?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbdxKSp0NEA And also: "Building a molecular orbital" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWk1JfPlN80
Views: 1935 Real Chemistry
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
10:36
This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 108245 Crash Chemistry Academy
Double and Triple Bonds
 
13:08
This video shows chemical bonds inside human body respiration & breathing. Oxygen atoms can form double bonds, and nitrogen atoms can form triple bonds to make diatomic gaseous molecules. But carbon atoms can't form a quadruple bonds, instead bonding to make a network solid. The role of O2, N2 and CO2 in breathing and respiration is explored, and more complex molecules are introduced. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: The thought experiments from our last video showed that hydrogen atoms can make only one bond, oxygen atoms can make 2, nitrogen three and carbon 4 bonds with other atoms. This number of bonds that an atom can make is called its valency. Hydrogen has a valency of 1, oxygen 2, nitrogen 3 and carbon 4. In our next thought experiment, we'll put lots of oxygen atoms in a box. But no hydrogen atoms this time. Like hydrogen, oxygen atoms stick together in pairs. 3.1 When another oxygen atom hits this pair, it doesn’t stick. HC? How come? Don’t oxygen atoms like to bond to two other atoms? If it bond with hydrogen, which has only one bond, it will need two of them, and the new molecule will be H2O, water. But when it bonds with another oxygen, it has one bond left over. The other oxygen does too. If hydrogen atoms were available they could join with these bonds to make a complete molecule. But if there aren't any spare hydrogen atoms floating about, can you see another solution? The oxygens can bond to each other a second time. The 2 oxygens then form a double bond between them. Now both oxygen atoms are using both of their bonds, and are satisfying their valency of 2. The stick diagram for this molecule shows the 2 oxygen atoms joined by the double bond. The chemical formula for this molecule is O2. The 2 is showing us that there are 2 oxygen atoms in the molecule, not that there are 2 bonds between the atoms. That's just a coincidence. Oxygen is a colourless gas, and about 20% of the air is made of O2 molecules. When we breathe in, our bodies can absorb them into our blood steam and keep us alive.
Views: 67373 AtomicSchool
Oxy the oxygen molecule Ep.2: The Mucus Monster
 
00:55
Oxy's epic battle against the evil mucus monster!
Views: 209 Oxytheoxygen
Making Sense of Chemical Structures
 
08:59
Drawings and naming organic molecules leads to mass confusion for Biology students, most of whom have not yet taken Organic Chemistry. This video will introduce you to this strange world filled with chains and rings and help you to make sense of it. If you have watched my CHEMISTRY BASICS videos I and II (links below) you are ready for what comes next! By the end of the video you will be able to look at structures for aspirin and caffeine and figure out the chemical formula for each. YES YOU WILL!!! Links to CHEMISTRY BASICS VIDEOS Chemistry Basics Part I: http://youtu.be/MYuh5yErdfA Chemistry Basics Part II: http://youtu.be/Juw7HBg0zZs JOIN THE FUN all over the WEB: SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/user/ThePenguinProf FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ThePenguinProf GOOGLE+: https://plus.google.com/+Penguinprof/posts TWITTER: https://twitter.com/penguinprof WEB: http://www.penguinprof.com/ VIDEO DETAILS: Feel the Power of STRUCTURES Recall: Bonding Rules are based on valence electrons Hydrogen: happy with 1 covalent bond Carbon: happy with 4 covalent bonds Nitrogen: happy with 3 covalent bonds Oxygen: happy with 2 covalent bonds Organic chemistry codifies lots of things: How Many Carbons? Types of Carbon-Carbon Bonds Let's get drawing and understanding: Ethanol: (structure to formula: C2H6O Ethanol has two carbon atoms (eth-) with a single bond between them (-ane), and an attached -OH group (suffix "-ol") RULES: 1. Carbon lives at BENDS and ENDS 2. HYDROGENS bring carbon HAPPINESS Let's try another: Caffeine (structure to formula): C8H10N4O2 And finally: Aspirin: (structure to formula): C9H8O4
Views: 183720 ThePenguinProf
Oxygen Molecule 3D rotation view
 
00:49
Simple rotation of an oxygen molecule, if you would like to use this for your non profit organization email me at [email protected]
Sigma and Pi Bonds Explained, Basic Introduction, Chemistry
 
06:17
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into sigma and pi bonds. It explains how to calculate the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule given its lewis structure. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
A Brief Introduction to Molecular Orbitals - Hydrogen, Helium, NItrogen and Oxygen
 
09:27
Professor Davis demonstrates the energetics and geometries of molecular orbitals in simple diatomic gasses like hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. Bonding and anti-bonding orbitals and their relative energies are shown. The monatomic nature of helium is also addressed.
Views: 2079 ChemSurvival
Valence Bond Theory, Hybrid Orbitals, and Molecular Orbital Theory
 
07:54
Alright, let's be real. Nobody understands molecular orbitals when they first take chemistry. You just pretend you do, and then in your next course you learn them a little better. And then a little better than that. And five years later you sort of understand them. So don't get discouraged! Just watch this for a head start and do your best. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 468723 Professor Dave Explains
Chemical Bonds(Covalent) in Hydrogen,Nitrogen,Oxygen &Fluorine-Dr.Amal K Kumar
 
05:30
This is an Chemical Edutainment video.The animation in this video is designed to assist school students to learn chemistry easily through entertainment. I imposed the background song ( Indian classic 'Desh rag' ) to create an attention catching effect.
Views: 1003 Dr. Amal K Kumar
how to weigh the oxygen molecule
 
02:43
kguy in the lab shows an easy way to make a foam with a volume that correlates with the molecular weight of oxygen. what fun!
Views: 238 killarneyguy

Vet cover letters examples
Most effective cover letter template
Sample cover letters for employment gaps in resumes
Data analysis dissertation help free
Mcdonald's jobs applications