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Search results “Physical chemical methods of analysis”
Dimensional Analysis
 
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MIT RES.TLL-004 Concept Vignettes View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/RES-TLL-004F13 Instructor: Ken Kamrin This video leads students through the problem solving method of dimensional analysis. In one example, students use dimensional analysis to determine the diameter of a parachute needed to slow a rover to 90m/s in order to safely land on Mars. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 151242 MIT OpenCourseWare
Mod-11 Lec-29 Nano-particle Characterization: Bottom-Up Synthesis Methods
 
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Particle Characterization by Dr. R. Nagarajan, Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 23113 nptelhrd
Spectrophotometry introduction | Kinetics | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Spectrophotometry, transmittance, absorbance and the Beer-Lambert Law. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chem-kinetics/spectrophotometry-tutorial/v/spectrophotometry-example?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chem-kinetics/arrhenius-equation/v/catalysts?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 485224 Khan Academy
Lab Techniques & Safety: Crash Course Chemistry #21
 
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Hank takes a break from the desk to bring you to the lab in order to demonstrate some important points about the practical side of chemistry - experimentation in the laboratory. You'll learn what to wear in the lab, how to dispose of chemicals safely, how to avoid the most common accidents, how to pour solutions properly, what the HazMat diamond means, what an MSDS is, and how to use a fume hood. And as a reward for sticking with him through this maybe less-than-thrilling lecture, you'll see Hank subject himself to an exciting piece of safety apparatus. -- Table of Contents Proper Lab Attire 0:51 Disposing Chemicals Safely 6:30 Avoiding Common Lab Accidents 5:40 Proper Pouring 5:19 Hazmat Diamond 2:26 MSDS 3:05 How to use Fume Hoods 3:38 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1076352 CrashCourse
Converting Units With Conversion Factors
 
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This video focuses on converting units of measurement with conversion factors. It explains how to convert units of length, time, capacity, volume, area, mass, speed / velocity, and density which is useful for students taking chemistry, math, or physics. This video on converting units of measurement is also useful for kids in 4th grade, 5th grade, and 6th grade. This tutorial contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Metric System Made Easy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQMUHIyd-0g Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Significant Figures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2yuDvwYq5g Intro To Scientific Notation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BtzXojuM1o How To Win The Tic Tac Toe Game! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRlSJzBCPMM Here is a list of topics: 1. Common Conversion Factors of Length, Time, & Capacity / Volume 2. How to convert centimeters to meters - cm to m 3. Converting milliliters to Liters - mL to L 4. kilometers to centimeters - km to cm 5. Milliliters to Cubic Meters - mL to m^3 6. One step vs two step conversion practice problems 7. Multi-step dimensional analysis problems 8. meters per second to kilometers per hour - m/s to km/h 9. miles per hour to meters per second - mph to m/s or mi/hr to m/s 10. grams per milliliter to kilograms per cubic meter - g/ml to kg/m^3 11. how to convert square feet to square yards - ft^2 to yd^2 12. converting square centimeters to square meters - cm^2 to m^2 13. cubic yards to cubic feet - yd^3 to ft^3
The Scientific Method: Steps, Terms and Examples
 
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Visit Study.com for thousands more videos like this one. You'll get full access to our interactive quizzes and transcripts and can find out how to use our videos to earn real college credit. YouTube hosts only the first few lessons in each course. The rest are at Study.com. Take the next step in your educational future and graduate with less debt and in less time.
Views: 725836 Study.com
Chem 125. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 22. Retrosynthetic Analysis. Diels-Alder; Robinson Annulation.
 
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UCI Chem 125 Advanced Organic Chemistry (Spring 2016) Lec 22. Retrosynthetic Analysis. Diels-Alder; Robinson Annulation. View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_125_advanced_organic_chemistry.html Instructor: James S. Nowick, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: The course builds upon the concepts and skills learned in a typical yearlong sophomore-level organic chemistry class. Topics include: The Chemical Literature and Databases; Stereochemistry and Structural Organic Chemistry; Synthetic Organic Chemistry; Mechanistic and Physical Organic Chemistry; NMR Spectroscopy. Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem 125) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 28-lecture junior/senior-level undergraduate-level course titled "Advanced Organic Chemistry" taught at UC Irvine by Professor James S. Nowick. Index of Topics: 0:01:23 Retrosynthetic Analysis 0:05:17 Problem 8.7 0:11:18 Robinson Annulation 0:21:28 Proposed Synthesis for Problem 8.7 0:41:45 Danishefsky Synthesis Recorded May 18, 2016. Required attribution: Nowick, James S., Advanced Organic Chemistry 125 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_125_advanced_organic_chemistry.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 23273 UCI Open
Experimental Error Analysis
 
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In this video I introduce the most simple form of experimental error analysis (actual and percentage error). This is required for all laboratory experiments until perhaps second year in university. Therafter a technique of adding errors in quadrature is required.
Views: 27214 Adam Beatty
Finite Element Method (FEM) - Finite Element Analysis (FEA): Easy Explanation
 
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Finite Element Method (FEM) - Finite Element Analysis (FEA): Easy Explanation is awesome! Demonstrates its application to civil engineering problems. Excellent for engineering students. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0LHEYTEAyndlUqRJYtBZEg
Metallography Part II - Microscopic Techniques
 
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Metallography Part II - Microscopic Techniques - Sectioning of a sample - Wet grinding in several stages - Polishing in several stages - Etching - Observation with a metallographic microscope Responsible for this video: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Rainer Schwab, Hochschule Karlsruhe, University of Applied Sciences, Karlsruhe, Germany
Views: 139936 MaterialsScience2000
Precipitation Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #9
 
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A lot of ionic compounds dissolve in water, dissociating into individual ions. But when two ions find each other that form an insoluble compound, they suddenly fall out of solution in what's called a precipitation reaction. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we learn about precipitation, precipitates, anions, cations, and how to describe and discuss ionic reactions. Table of Contents Precipitate Reactions 0:34 Determining Precipitates 1:35 Writing Precipitate Reactions 6:31 Calculating Molar Mass Equation 8:52 Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1355908 CrashCourse
The Real Science of Forensics
 
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In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/04/fbi-plans-have-52-million-photos-its-ngi-face-recognition-database-next-year http://www.alternet.org/story/153664/5_things_you_should_know_about_the_fbi's_massive_new_biometric_database http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/13/us/facial-recognition-software-moves-from-overseas-wars-to-local-police.html http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/15/opinion/how-the-fbi-uses-facial-recognition-analysis.html?_r=2 http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/8/5982727/face-wreck-how-advanced-tech-comes-up-short-for-police http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/dna-evidence.htm http://www.scientific.org/tutorials/articles/riley/riley.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/20205874 http://www.mlo-online.com/articles/201404/str-typing-method-and-applications.php http://www.cstl.nist.gov/strbase/pub_pres/Butler_BiotechniquesSuppl_Oct2007.pdf http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/facial-recognition1.htm http://www.mitchpileggi.net/Deep_Background/resources/forensics/bodies.htm https://books.google.com/books?id=adKcM055ERoC&pg=PT265 http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f02/web2/wcarroll.html http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/43078/stop-believing-tvs-lies-the-real-truth-about-enhancing-images/ http://nzic.org.nz/ChemProcesses/biotech/12A.pdf
Views: 819068 SciShow
Titration introduction | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to acid-base titrations using example of titrating 20.0 mL of HCl of unknown concentration with 0.100 M NaOH. Covers indicators, endpoint, equivalence point, and calculating the unknown concentration. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/acid-base-equilibrium/titrations/v/titration-calculation-example?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/acid-base-equilibrium/buffer-solutions/v/ways-to-get-a-buffer-solution?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Determination of Physical & Chemical Properties of Soils
 
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Soil Science, Course Code:-ET 531, Block-III
Views: 10881 ignousoet
Webinar -- Water Quality Sampling and Analysis
 
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This webinar provides a review of water sampling methods and subsequent analysis for water operators, field sample technicians, and others. The presenter will be talking about equipment used, calibrating, cleaning, and maintaining instruments, common field measurements, sample collection and testing, and evaluating results. The presenter is Ernie Rector, Market Manager at the LaMotte Company in Chestertown, Maryland. Ernie began working as the Market Manager handling the Industrial, Water and Wastewater sections for the LaMotte Company in 2010. His previous experience was as a Water Operator and Laboratory Technician at a public drinking water utility for 25 years. He graduated from the Delaware Technical and Community College with an AAS in Chemistry Technology. Visit us at http://www.lamotte.com
Views: 38675 LaMotte Company
Unit Conversion & Significant Figures: Crash Course Chemistry #2
 
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A unit is the frequently arbitrary designation we have given to something to convey a definite magnitude of a physical quantity and every quantity can be expressed in terms of the seven base units that are contained in the international system of units. Hank thinks this is a thrilling subject, and while you may not agree, it is a subject that is very important if you want to be a scientist and communicate with accuracy and precision with other scientists. So listen up and learn something or Hank might have to kill you! (NOT REALLY!) Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Follow ThoughtCafe! http://www.twitter.com/ThoughtBubbler Tumbl Crash Course. http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Unit Conversion 02:27 Scientific Notation 03:26 Sig Figs 07:40 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2638356 CrashCourse
Weighing on an Analytical Balance, A Chemistry Lab Demo From Thinkwell
 
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http://www.thinkwell.com/student/product/chemistry?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=info&utm_campaign=weighing_on_an_analytical_balance Wish Professor Yee was your teacher or tutor? He can be! Click the link to learn more about Thinkwell's Online Video Chemistry Course.
Views: 52664 ThinkwellVids
Synthesis of Aspirin Lab
 
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Part of NCSSM CORE collection: This video shows the synthesis of aspirin. http://www.dlt.ncssm.edu Please attribute this work as being created by the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. This work is licensed under Creative Commons CC-BY http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GAf5/
HOW TO TEST DRINKING WATER QUALITY
 
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HOW TO TEST FOR LEAD, BACTERIA, PESTICIDES, ETC. A COST EFFECTIVE WAY TO TEST YOUR DRINKING WATER. TESTING COST ME $12.50 PER WATER SAMPLE. YOU SHOULD TEST ALL OF YOUR DRINKING WATER SOURCES TO BE SURE OF THE QUALITY.
Views: 378917 Fubar Protocol
Physical vs Chemical Properties Explained, Examples, Chemistry Video
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the concept of physical and chemical properties of matter. Examples of physical properties include density, boiling point, viscosity, mass, weight, solubility, ductility, and malleability. Examples of chemical properties include reactivity, acidity, flammability, and more. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Kinetics: Initial Rates and Integrated Rate Laws
 
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Who likes math! Oh, you don't? Maybe skip this one. Unless you have to answer this stuff for class. Then yeah, watch this. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 244690 Professor Dave Explains
Salt Analysis Preliminary Tests Edunovus Online Smart Practicals
 
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Systematic procedure for qualitative analysis. Check out more video on: http://www.edunovusonline.com Subscribe us on YT : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3DpOXGFQISBnEwaf0AejZw Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Edunovus-Online-1684890518448115/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Edunovusonline Mail us at : [email protected] Edunovus Online - Learning Made Easy Copyright © Edunovus Online. All rights reserved.
Views: 507268 Edunovus Online
Qualitative Analysis - Problem 2
 
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Qualitative Analysis - Problem 2 Watch More Videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Revathi Ramachandran, Tutorials Point India Private Limited.
Flow Chemistry: What is Continuous Flow Chemistry? – Application Introduction – METTLER TOLEDO – en
 
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Continuous flow chemistry has been used in the chemical and petrochemical markets for decades. Recently continuous flow chemistry production methodology has been gaining interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to the inherent increased safety, improved product quality, space savings and overall production capacity increase. https://www.mt.com/us/en/home/applications/L1_AutoChem_Applications/continuous.html?GLO_YT_Autochem_OTH_Youtube_Autochem In its simplest form, continuous flow chemistry begins with two or more streams of different materials for example starting material and reactants that are pumped at predetermine flow rates into a single chamber, a tube or in some cases a micro reactor which contains very small channels where the flowing material mixes and reacts with one another. At this point the materials mix together and react as they flow through the reaction chamber. Due to the very small size of the reaction tube or channels of the micro reactor only small amounts of materials are needed for the reaction. This dramatically reduces the amount needed for expensive compounds, lowers the solvent requirement, improves temperature control, and overall increases safety because of the lower quantity of material for potential exposure. Based on the reaction kinetics and flow rates of the material, a specific residence time within the micro reactor is needed to ensure that all starting material was converted to the desired product which in turn is then collected at the outlet of the micro reactor in a flask or container of some suitable type. Since the reaction is in a continuous flowing stream it is highly desirable to monitor the state of the reaction to note conditions such as steady state, dispersion characteristics, reactive intermediates and so forth. To do this requires technology that lends itself to identification of each individual reaction component all the while in a flowing stream. ReactIR fitted with a micro flow cell is such an appropriate technology. ReactIR is based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and when coupled with Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR), it is ideal for in situ measurement and trending of reaction components. FTIR by very nature is specific in that each functional group of a given material has a unique fingerprint spectrum. This allows easy differentiation in determination of reaction components and when measuring the intensity of the respective IR signal over time you are able to trend the relative or the absolute concentration over the course of the reaction. In other words, you can watch the trends changing and when a plateau is reached you can be sure the reaction is at steady state. The ReactIR micro flow cell is a miniature version of a reactor with a 10 to 50 micro liter volume whereby the flowing stream from the continuous flow reactor flows into the micro flow cell, across the top of the ATR sensor and then swiftly out of the micro flow cell. The harder the measurement happens at the interface of the ATR sensor in the flowing stream. Infrared radiation from the ReactIR instrument travels into the sensor portion of the micro flow cell where it is directed into the diamond or silicon ATR sensor. Once inside the sensor the IR beam is totally internally reflected and bounces through the ATR sensor until it reaches the end where it exits the sensor and returns to the detector of the ReactIR. The detector then measures the intensity of the IR beam. Infrared energy penetrates a very short distance into the liquid stream and a portion of the IR radiation is absorbed by the molecules in the reaction stream. The absorptions occur in very specific regions of the IR spectrum and are completely dependent upon the type of molecule or functional group absorbing the radiation. Measurement of the IR beam that makes its way back to the detector gives rise to an absorption spectrum. This spectrum contains a fingerprint of each molecules functional groups and/or absorption profile. This then allows scientists to identify, quantify and trend the concentration of these reaction components over time. All of this is accomplished in situ and without pertivation of the flowing reaction stream. Interfacing in situ ReactIR with continuous flow chemistry provides a real time video of the reaction chemistry as it takes place in the flowing stream. Instantaneous knowledge regarding the reaction parameters is inherent in this work flow. https://www.mt.com/us/en/home/products/L1_AutochemProducts/ReactIR.html
Views: 33387 MettlerToledoAC
IR spectroscopy principle basics
 
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IR spectroscopy principle basics - This lecture explains about the infrared spectroscopy also known as IR spectroscopy. IR spectroscopy is important to understand the structure of unknown molecules and chemical structures. Infrared Spectroscopy is the analysis of infrared light interacting with a molecule. This can be analyzed in three ways by measuring absorption, emission and reflection. This video lecture will help you to understand the IR spectroscopy mechanism and the use of infrared spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry. Advantages and disadvantages of IR spectroscopy is well explained in this video lecture. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Thank you for watching IR spectroscopy lecture by Suman Bhattacharjee This video is inspired by the work of YouTube video of Knowbee channel. You can watch it here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0S_bt3JI150
Views: 332318 Shomu's Biology
NMR spectroscopy
 
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NMR spectroscopy lecture by Suman Bhattacharjee - This lecture explains about the NMR spectroscopy basics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy, is a research technique that exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei. It determines the physical and chemical properties of atoms or the molecules in which they are contained. It relies on the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and can provide detailed information about the structure, dynamics, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules. The intramolecular magnetic field around an atom in a molecule changes the resonance frequency, thus giving access to details of the electronic structure of a molecule. Most frequently, NMR spectroscopy is used by chemists and biochemists to investigate the properties of organic molecules, although it is applicable to any kind of sample that contains nuclei possessing spin. Suitable samples range from small compounds analyzed with 1-dimensional proton or carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy to large proteins or nucleic acids using 3 or 4-dimensional techniques. The impact of NMR spectroscopy on the sciences has been substantial because of the range of information and the diversity of samples, including solutions and solids. NMR spectra are unique, well-resolved, analytically tractable and often highly predictable for small molecules. Thus, in organic chemistry practice, NMR analysis is used to confirm the identity of a substance. Different functional groups are obviously distinguishable, and identical functional groups with differing neighboring substituents still give distinguishable signals. NMR has largely replaced traditional wet chemistry tests such as color reagents for identification. A disadvantage is that a relatively large amount, 2–50 mg, of a purified substance is required, although it may be recovered. Preferably, the sample should be dissolved in a solvent, because NMR analysis of solids requires a dedicated MAS machine and may not give equally well-resolved spectra. The timescale of NMR is relatively long, and thus it is not suitable for observing fast phenomena, producing only an averaged spectrum. Although large amounts of impurities do show on an NMR spectrum, better methods exist for detecting impurities, as NMR is inherently not very sensitive. NMR spectrometers are relatively expensive; universities usually have them, but they are less common in private companies. Modern NMR spectrometers have a very strong, large and expensive liquid helium-cooled superconducting magnet, because resolution directly depends on magnetic field strength. Less expensive machines using permanent magnets and lower resolution are also available, which still give sufficient performance for certain application such as reaction monitoring and quick checking of samples. There are even benchtop NMR spectrometers. This important and well-established application of nuclear magnetic resonance will serve to illustrate some of the novel aspects of this method. To begin with, the nmr spectrometer must be tuned to a specific nucleus, in this case the proton. The actual procedure for obtaining the spectrum varies, but the simplest is referred to as the continuous wave (CW) method. A typical CW-spectrometer is shown in the following diagram. Article source - Wikipedia.org For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching NMR spectroscopy lecture by Suman Bhattacharjee.
Views: 338195 Shomu's Biology
Introduction to Electrochemistry
 
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Everything you need to know about Electrochemistry. Electrochemistry is the relationship between electricity and chemical reactions. There are two ways that electricity and chemical reactions interact: certain chemical reactions can create electricity, and electricity can force certain chemical reactions to happen that wouldn't happen otherwise. We'll look at two very common examples in electrochemistry. We'll see how a galvanic or voltaic cell uses a chemical reaction to create electricity, and we'll see how electrolysis uses electricity to cause water to decompose into hydrogen and oxygen gas. We'll also look at the list of Standard Reduction Potentials, to figure out what chemical reactions will happen on their own (are spontaneous) are can create electricity, and which will not happen on their own (are not spontaneous) and require electricity to happen.
Views: 540577 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Analysis & Physical Analysis of Textiles Realistic Interview, or Viva Voce
 
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Ignore text-bookish interview videos, where you are just a ring-side observer. Instead, engage yourself in realistic professional interviews at www.InterviewMax.com. These are the type of interviews you must face, and pass – if you want to ensure a successful career in line with your hard-earned qualifications. In InterviewMax professional interviews, you are a participant and involve yourselves. You feel the heat of the interview, and experience the consequences!!! This interview (Chemical & Physical Analysis of Textiles Interview) has been extracted from the ‘Textile Production Engineering Interview Simulator and Trainer’ that has 52 topics and over 5100 questions. Chemical analysis of textiles, Fibre Identification by using different chemical reagents, End group analysis of fibres. Determination of saponification value of PET, Melting point, molecular weight measurements, Refractive index and Bi refringes, etc.Determination of moisture related properties such as absorbency, Moisture retention and moisture regain, etc. Analysis of fibre blends: Various methods such as microscopic, mechanical, chemical, etc, Factors affecting accuracy of quantitative analysis of fibre blends, Correction factors, Methods of quantitative analysis. Determination of size content, Formaldehyde and resin textiles. Aim and scope of testing, Measurement of twist, length, fineness, crimp, count, Hairiness of yarn, Yarn numbering systems and conversions. Determinations of foreign matter, Maturity of fibres.Testing of Tensile Property of fibres, Yarns & fabrics, Fabric thickness, Compressibility, Resilience, Rigidity, Drape & other properties, Associated with the fabric handle, Cloth tear test & test for bursting strength & resistance to wear.Measurement of yarn & sliver irregularity, Test for air permeability & thermal transmission. The Interview Simulator & Trainer helps every Textile Production Engineering Professional to respond meaningfully on the spot – in job interviews, viva examinations, technical presentations, client interactions etc. Want to know how it can transform your life? Visit www.InterviewMax.com. Attend your next interview or viva examination with an undue advantage! This simulator gives you the realistic professional interview experience – any number of times, until you reach the level of interaction that is required by your dream job. It is customisable! You can choose the specific topics for each of your interview/viva examinations from: Scouring & Bleaching, Textile Design & Colour, Textile Fibres, Fibre Physics, Yarn Preparation & Weaving, Analytical Textile Chemistry, Chemical & Physical Analysis of Textiles, Chemistry of Intermediates & Dyes, Applications of Textile Auxiliaries, Technology of Dyeing, Technology of Finishing, Technology of Printing, Processing of Garments, Management of Dye House, New Technologies in Textile Processing, Textile Costing, Technical Textile, Modern Spinning Technology, Modern Weaving Technology, Process Control & Quality in Spinning, Process Control & Quality in Weaving, Fashion Art & Technology, Industrial Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Drives & Controls, Electrical Machines, Electronic Instrumentation, PLC & SCADA Applications, Chemical Process Safety, Corrosion Engineering, Mechanical Operations for Textile Engineers, Plastics in textile Packaging. Reliability Engineering, Project Management, Engineering Habits of Mind, Critical Thinking, 21st Century Skills, Product Design Methodology, Energy Conservation, Engineering Economics, Engineering Ethics, Ergonomics & Human Factors, Safety, Responsibility & Rights, Industrial Relations, Office/Factory Management, Operations Research, Production Management, Engineering Marketing, Behavioural Science, Finance for Engineers, Quality Assurance, World Class Manufacturing of textile production accessories. (Each of the above topics contains 80 to 110 questions.)
Views: 131 InterviewMax
Beer's Law Laboratory
 
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Check out http://www.mrayton.com/access.html for hundreds of AP Chemistry multiple choice and free response practice questions! Check out Learnerator for thousands of AP Chemistry and AP Physics practice questions! Enter the code AYTON10 for 10% off your order! Just click http://learnerator.com?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=bobayton
Views: 169456 Robert Ayton
Stoichiometry | Chemical reactions and stoichiometry | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to stoichiometry. Using the balanced reaction to find molar ratios. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/stoichiometry-ideal/v/stoichiometry-example-problem-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/balancing-chemical-equations/v/balancing-chemical-equation-with-substitution?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2367578 Khan Academy
What Is Analytical Chemistry - Mr. Wizard's Quick Quiz
 
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Learn about Analytical Chemistry with Mr. Wizard. Subscribe now for more science, nature and technology clips from the 1980's Nickelodeon show, Mr. Wizard's World, every week on #WizardWednesdays.
Views: 27444 MrWizardStudios
Examination of Urine, Physical Chemical,
 
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Subject: Physical Education Course Name: B.P.Ed Keyword: Swayamprabha
States of Matter | Physical Chemistry | Solved Questions | Target JEE Advanced | Chemistry
 
27:58
5 JEE Advanced Level solved questions and Chapter analysis with Ashish Sir. States of matter, as a topic usually tests gaseous state behaviour. Important topics like ideal gas equation, kinetic theory of gases, real gas equation and Dalton’s law are frequently tested. To dig a little deeper, one might also want to look at topics as mean free path and collision frequency. This chapter forms the basis of Physical Chemistry and is tested very often in tandem with various chapters. Question 1. All the basics of ideal gas equation can be used here. One needs to integrate the given relation and simplify it to solve this quickly. 10:32 Question 2. The graph shows molecular speeds marked. Basic idea of relating molecular velocities with mass and using simple mathematical ideas gives us all the answers here. 14:57 Question 3. Start this off by using Graham’s Law of diffusion and then relate densities with molar volume. Simply plugging in this value in Z = PV/RT we get the answer.19:04 Question 4. This question tests the ability to analyze the graphical data to estimate the deviation from ideality. At varying pressure and temperature conditions, the graph will show positive or negative deviation. Depending on this analysis, curve C can be estimated. 23:30 Question 5. Once the correct conditions have been estimated in the previous question, it becomes easy to simply plug in the temperature value in the calculation of Z. 25:32 👉 Subscribe to BYJU'S JEE - https://bit.ly/2FNnINs Preparing for the JEE Exam? Get access to engaging video lessons for concept clarity & tackle every problem in an easier way. With BYJU'S JEE, target CBSE board exams and entrance exams like IIT JEE Main & Advanced with equal ease. High definition visualization techniques help in exam preparation, revision and retention of concepts. Made by IITians, BYJU'S is everything you need to crack the JEE. 👉 Install the BYJU'S App - http://bit.ly/Playstore-Appstore 👉 Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ByjusJEE/
Views: 1013 BYJU'S JEE
Mass spectrometry part 3 : protein analysis (step by step process)
 
35:56
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 68963 Shomu's Biology
Mod-01 Lec-24 Potential Evaluation of Ground water Pollution; Physical/Chemical/Biological analysis
 
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Ground Water Hydrology by Dr. V.R. Desai & Dr. Anirban Dhar,Department of Civil Engineering,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 1224 nptelhrd
Acid-Base Reactions in Solution: Crash Course Chemistry #8
 
11:17
Last week, Hank talked about how stuff mixes together in solutions. Today, and for the next few weeks, he will talk about the actual reactions happening in those solutions - atoms reorganizing themselves to create whole new substances in the processes that make our world the one we know and love. This week, we focus on acids and bases and their proton-exchanging ways. Table of Contents Chemistry Can Cause Death 00:00 Acids and Bases are Complicated 02:25 Conjugate Bases 05:37 Conjugate Acids 04:48 Acid Base Stoichiometry 06:49 Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2123580 CrashCourse
Thermodynamics, PV Diagrams, Internal Energy, Heat, Work, Isothermal, Adiabatic, Isobaric, Physics
 
03:05:16
This physics video tutorial explains the concept of the first law of thermodynamics. It shows you how to solve problems associated with PV diagrams, internal energy, heat, and work. It addition, it provides plenty of examples and practice problems associated with isothermal, isochoric or isovolumetric, isobaric, and adiabatic processes. Here is a list of topics: 1. First Law of Thermodynamics - Energy Transfer 2. Internal Energy, Heat, and Mechanical Work 3. System vs Surroundings 4. Sign Conventions for Q, Heat Absorbed vs Heat Energy Released 5. Work done on the system vs work done by the system 6. Positive Work - Gas Expansion vs Negative Work - Compression 7. Open System, Closed System and Isolated System 8. Isobaric Process - Constant Pressure 9. Work Done at Constant Pressure Formula / Equation 10. Units of Pressure - Converting atm to Pa 11. Units of Volume - m^3 and L conversion 12. Converting L and atm into Joules 13. PV Diagrams - Work Done = Area Under the Curve or Area of the Shaded Region 14. Cyclic Process, Q=W, Work is Positive for Clockwise Rotation and Negative for Counter Clockwise Direction 15. Ideal Gas Law, PV=nRT 16. Charles Law - Temperature and Volume Relationship 17. Converting Celsius to Kelvin Temperature 18. Heat Transferred During Isobaric Process Formula 19. Isochoric Process - Work Done is Zero 20. Isovolumetric Process - Constant Volume, Internal Energy, and Heat Transferred Equation 21. Thermodynamics Formula Sheet Summary 22. Molar Heat Capacity at Constant Pressure and Constant Volume 23. Monatomic Gases - He, Ne, and Ar - Helium, Neon, and Argon 24. Diatomic Gases - N2, O2, and H2 25. Cv and Cp values for ideal monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases 26. Gamma Ratio, Cp/Cv formula 27. Isochoric Process - Pressure and Temperature Formula 28. Combined Gas Law Equation 29. Isothermal Process - Constant Temperature 30. Work Done During an Isothermal Process - Natural Logarithms Derivation - Area under Curve 31. Boyle's Law - Pressure and Volume Relationship 32. Adiabatic Process - No Heat Transferred - Q=0 33. Adiabatic Expansion - Cooling Effect of an Ideal Gas 34. Adiabatic Compression - Increase in Temperature - No spark plugs needed in an internal combustion engine of this type 35. Work, Pressure, Volume and integration Formula, Calculus - Isothermal Process 36. Pressure and Volume Formula With Gamma Ratio 37. Temperature and Volume Equation With Gamma Ratio - Adiabatic Process 38. Internal Energy - State Function - Independent of Path 39. Work and Heat - Not a State Function, Path Dependent 40. PV diagram problems, work, heat, and internal energy calculations
Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC)
 
10:17
Fundamentals of the TLC Method
Views: 565077 CapilanoUChemlab
Osman Bakr - Physical & Chemical Characterization of Nanoparticle Constructs ...
 
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Watch on LabRoots at http://labroots.com/user/webinars/details/id/313 Colloidal nanoparticles have become important materials in biomedicine, catalysis, and optoelectronics. Their unique nanoscale properties stem from their size (particularly of the inorganic particle core) and surface composition of their organic ligand-shell. Given the polydispersity of nanoparticles, and complex composition, no technique other than Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) has the potential to provide detailed information on the overall particle size, density, molecular weight and aggregation state in solution. While AUC has become a standard tool for bioscientists to quantitatively study the size, confirmation, and interaction of macromolecules and proteins in solution for many decades, it has not had the same success with nanoparticles. Unlike nanoparticles, most proteins have a well-known partial specific volume, and hence it’s straightforward to convert quantities measured from AUC, such as the sedimentation coefficients, into parameters that provide physical insights into the macromolecule, such as frictional ratio (i.e. shape) and molecular weight. Recent advancements in the mathematical modeling of the sedimentation boundaries have enabled the parameterization of the sedimentation and diffusion coefficients of all the species detected in solution during centrifugation in terms of their partial specific volume and molecular weight. This advancement opens the door to quantitative investigation of most nanoparticle systems by AUC - without a priori knowledge of their partial specific volume - since most nanoparticles have a constant shape which can be assessed by electron microscopy. In this tutorial webinar I will introduce some of the latest methods and procedures to analyze nanoparticles in solution with AUC. I will also provide insights on avoiding common experimental challenges that researchers face when studying nanoparticles with the AUC, which may lead to artifacts in the experimental data.
Views: 1902 LabRoots
Absorption and Adsorption - Definition, Difference, Examples
 
04:54
Absorption And Adsorption Adsorption is the adhesion of molecules of gas, liquid, or dissolved solids to a surface. This process creates a film of the adsorbate (the molecules or atoms being accumulated) on the surface of the adsorbent. It differs from absorption, in which a fluid permeates or is dissolved by a liquid or solid. The term sorption encompasses both processes, while desorption is the reverse of adsorption. Similar to surface tension, adsorption is a consequence of surface energy. In a bulk material, all the bonding requirements (be they ionic, covalent, or metallic) of the constituent atoms of the material are filled by other atoms in the material. However, atoms on the surface of the adsorbent are not wholly surrounded by other adsorbent atoms and therefore can attract adsorbates. The exact nature of the bonding depends on the details of the species involved, but the adsorption process is generally classified as physisorption (characteristic of weak van der Waals forces) or chemisorption (characteristic of covalent bonding). Adsorption is present in many natural physical, biological, and chemical systems, and is widely used in industrial applications such as activated charcoal, capturing and using waste heat to provide cold water for air conditioning and other process requirements (adsorption chillers), synthetic resins, increase storage capacity of carbide-derived carbons for tunable nanoporous carbon, and water purification. Adsorption, ion exchange, and chromatography are sorption processes in which certain adsorbates are selectively transferred from the fluid phase to the surface of insoluble, rigid particles suspended in a vessel or packed in a column. Check out for more info: http://www.tutorvista.com/content/biology/biology-iv/animal-nutrition/assimilation.php Follow us at: https://twitter.com/TutorVista https://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
Views: 511437 TutorVista
Dimensional-Analysis-Step-by-Step-Method
 
05:28
Finding the pi-groups for the drag force on a sphere.
Views: 166717 Donald Elger
Techniques & Solutions for Particle Size Characterization
 
05:14
Understanding the physical characteristics in particle size is important for various elements of research and development, quality control and assurance as well as production in the powder compaction or blending process of potential products. In order to determine which techniques and instruments are right for you, it is important to understand what these techniques are actually measuring and how that influences the determined particle size.
Views: 42537 Micromeritics
Problem Solving Technique of Chemical Equilibrium of Physical Chemistry for NEET by JH Sir
 
11:19
Problem Solving Technique of Chemical Equilibrium video Lecture of Chemistry for NEET by JH Sir. JH Sir is known for his focused and simplified NEET teaching to bring to students an easy and analytical methodology towards NEET. This course is designed and developed by the experienced faculty of KOTA. Now watch more Video Lectures please visit our website : goo.gl/ZuJgV6 Now Watch More Video Lectures Please Subscribe Our YouTube Channel & get notification of Latest Uploaded Video Lectures. Please Subscribe Our Channel : https://goo.gl/Xbvx7a Get More Information : Email : [email protected] Content : +91 9214233303 | 43 Website: http://www.etoosindia.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/etoosindia Twitter: https://twitter.com/EtoosIndia Etoosindia is an Online Education Channel for JEE, NEET, CBSE & Foundation Courses. Offer Video Lectures by Kota's Best Faculties.
Views: 4958 Etoos Education
Types of Reactions Part-1 I NEET/JEE
 
38:16
Helios Educore Pvt. Ltd. Sunshine Business Park, Plot - 5A, Sector-94, Noida (UP) INDIA-201301 Chemistry Video Lectures to prepare for JEE-Main, JEE-Advanced, NEET & and Board Exams. visit us : www.helioseducore.com Email : [email protected] Mob. : 08010000068 For Purchase : http://helioseducore.com/product-category/buy-book/ or Amazon Search Er Dushyant Kumar
Views: 702639 Helios Educore
Mass spectrometry part 1 : introduction
 
24:09
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 238714 Shomu's Biology
Qualitative Analysis - Problem 8
 
03:42
Qualitative Analysis - Problem 8 Watch More Videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Revathi Ramachandran, Tutorials Point India Private Limited.
Mole Ratio Practice Problems
 
21:01
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Lots and lots and lots of practice problems with mole ratios. This is the first step in learning stoichiometry, for using a chemical equation to get mole ratios and using conversion factors and dimensional analysis on products and reactants.
Views: 1076744 Tyler DeWitt