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Yield to Maturity Versus Rate of Return
 
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This video makes a clear distinction between two commonly conflated fixed income market concepts: yield to maturity and rate of return. Though often described as a measure of future returns and regularly used as a proxy for such, as ways of conceiving of yield to maturity those interpretations are respectively inaccurate and potentially problematic. The presentation illustrates the method for computing the two measures and identifies why they will likely never be the same for long-term coupon securities. InsidersGuideToFinance.com facebook.com/insidersguidetofinance
Total Return on a Bond
 
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More videos at http://facpub.stjohns.edu/~moyr/videoonyoutube.htm
Views: 7511 Ronald Moy
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 494270 Khan Academy
Lesson 3 video 2: Calculating return on a bond investment
 
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In this video I will explain how to calculate the rate of return on bond investment.
Views: 1194 F. Tayari
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 36730 tutor2u
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 277258 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 2537 Arnold Tutoring
Bond Pricing, Valuation, Formulas, and Functions in Excel
 
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Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt Excel Tutorials: https://www.teachexcel.com/src=yt This tutorial will show you how to calculate bond pricing and valuation in excel. This teaches you how to do so through using the NPER() PMT() FV() RATE() and PV() functions and formulas in excel. To follow along with this tutorial and download the spreadsheet used and or to get free excel macros, keyboard shortcuts, and forums, go to: http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
Views: 171249 TeachExcel
Bonds | Confused between the rates: Spot, Forward, Coupon, Current Yield, IRR, YTM, BEY
 
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CFA | FRM | SFM | Excel Live Classes | Videos Available Globally For Details: www.aswinibajaj.com WhatsApp: +91 9831149876 or https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=919830497377&text=Want%20to%20know%20more%20about%20classes & we shall get back to you. E-mail: [email protected] Hope you had a great learning experience! Do Like and Subscribe! And check our other videos on Finance (CFA, FRM, SFM), Resume making, Career options, etc. Click to access playlist. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyt8... Thank you.
Views: 9684 ASWINI BAJAJ
Real and nominal return | Inflation | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Inflation and real and nominal return. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/inflation-tutorial/real-nominal-return-tut/v/calculating-real-return-in-last-year-dollars?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/inflation-tutorial/inflation-scenarios-tutorial/v/hyperinflation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If the value of money is constantly changing, can we compare investment return in the future or past to that earned in the present? This tutorial focuses on how to do this (another good tutorial to watch is the one on "present value"). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 167987 Khan Academy
How to Price/Value Bonds - Formula, Annual, Semi-Annual, Market Value, Accrued Interest
 
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http://www.subjectmoney.com http://www.subjectmoney.com/definitiondisplay.php?word=Bond%20Pricing In this video we show you how to calculate the value or price of a bond. We teach you the present value formula and then use examples to discount the coupon payments and principle payment to their present value. We also show you how to solve the price of a semi-annual bond. In this case you would multiply the periods by two and divide the YTM and coupon payments by 2. We also show you how to solve the accrued interest of a bond to find out what it would sell for at a date that is not on the exact coupon payment date. https://www.youtube.com/user/Subjectmoney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zCqoED8MVk http://www.roofstampa.com hjttp://roofstampa.com http:/www.subjectmoney.com http://www.excelfornoobs.com
Views: 79670 Subjectmoney
IRR (Internal Rate of Return)
 
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This video explains the concept of IRR (the internal rate of return) and illustrates how to calculate the IRR via an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 581300 Edspira
What Is The Average Rate Of Return On Bonds?
 
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Over the long term, stocks do better. Since 1926, large stocks have returned an average of 10 % per year; long-term government bonds have returned between 5% and 6%, according to investment researcher Morningstar. 28 average interest rates on u. The average rate of return a bond. Sthe files listed below illustrate the average interest rates for marketable and non securities over a bond's annual rate of return, or coupon, describes percentage its principle that it pays each year in dividends. The finance base thefinancebase average rate return bond 5143. Fidelity floating rate high income fund (ffrhx), 5. Show to calculate the annual rate of return on a bond budgeting yield and historical returns stocks, bonds bills united states. The long term rate of return for bonds vs stocks in the period 1928 to 2010, earned an average 11. Continuing the example above, if average interest rate increases to 7 percent, investors aren't willing purchase a bond with substandard 6 percent return. How do bond returns compare with stock returns? Ultimate guide the average rate of return a how investopedia. Percent, while bonds earned just 5. Average annual returns can lead investors astray forbes. Html url? Q webcache. Since 1926, large stocks have returned an average of 10. Arithmetic average, stocks t. The coupon stream, usually paid semi annually, is the source of income a rate return can be applied to any investment vehicle, from real estate bonds, stocks and fine art, provided asset purchased at one point in time jul 1, 2017 comparison, domestic bond market, as gauged by barclays aggregate u. A typical yield curve is upward sloping, meaning that securities with longer jan 5, 2017 the raw data for treasury bond and bill returns obtained from federal it will not match rate each period. Average annual return, 5. Updated daily, get current rates for cds, muni bonds, money market funds, as of close 9 27 2017 yield to average life (. Consequently, the market price of bond falls to approximate prevailing rates so investors receive a 7 percent return on purchase over long term, stocks do better. Aug 7, 2012 when a treasury bond is issued, it pays fixed rate of interest, in interest rates as with an average duration five years return can be backfitted into your portfolio by using the latest estimates score recommends you build balanced 60 Bond investing. What rate of return can you expect from your portfolio? Kiplinger. Oct 30, 2010 the average rate of return a bond has two components. Long term performance data of stocks vsthe long rate return for bonds vs government average interest rates on u. If you can reinvest returns at the same rate, nov 17, 2014 this eye opening chart comes from jp morgan asset management. Bond index, had an average annual return of 4. Oct 17, 2016 yet, investors are ultimately aiming for an above average return on annual rates of returns can be used in stocks, mutual funds and bonds apr 19, 2011 there is a glaring error the math commonly inves
Views: 77 Shanell Kahl Tipz
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
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Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 51870 Fidelity Investments
What is the average rate of return on bonds
 
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What is the average rate of return on bonds - Find out more explanation for : 'What is the average rate of return on bonds' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Views: 7 atunakai10a
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Pricing a Bond with Yield To Maturity, Lecture 013, Securities Investment 101, Video 00015
 
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In this lecture, we price the same standard bond given three different ratings agency ratings, which has given us three different required overall yields to get from the bond, given the changing levels of risk. After explaining the theory of present valuing the different fixed cashflows, we then use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the three different bond prices. The lecture finishes with an Excel chart which displays the relationships between coupon rate, flat yield, and yield to maturity, as well as highlighting the most important concept in bond trading; when required interest rates go up, bond prices go down, and when required interest rates go down, bond prices go up. For those who wish to know how to calculate a yield to maturity given a market bond price, see the next lecture. Previous: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tN32FU3D_k Next: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHR_GSEisRs For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com/ This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
Views: 40613 MithrilMoney
Calculating the Total Return on a Stock
 
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This video shows how to calculate the total return on a stock. The total return of a stock is a function of two components: the dividend yield and the capital gain (increase in share price). This video uses a comprehensive example to demonstrate how the total return of a stock is calculated using a handy formula. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 34812 Edspira
Bonds - Par Value and more
 
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Bonds - Par Value and more
Views: 14760 Engineer Clearly
Bonds Effective Interest Method - Discount
 
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This video explains how to calculate a bond that sells at a discount. It shows the corresponding journal entries on the original sale and interest payments. It also shows how to prepare the amortization table and explains what the numbers represent.
Views: 23286 mattfisher64
FRM: TI BA II+ to compute bond yield (YTM)
 
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Given four inputs (price, term/maturity, coupon rate, and face/par value), we can use the calculator's I/Y to find the bond's yield (yield to maturity). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 114345 Bionic Turtle
Short Term High Yield Bonds
 
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The current low interest rate environment means that bond investors have to take more risk in order to gain an attractive return on their invested money. The current low interest rates also present a risk that if interest rates and inflation rise in the future, then bond prices may fall and portfolios could suffer losses.
Views: 7130 hubbis
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
7 Painful Ways to Lose Money Investing in Bonds
 
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Did you know that there are 7 different ways to lose money investing in bonds? That’s right, investing in bonds isn’t always a safe and low-risk investment. However, once you know and understand the risk associated with bond trading, then the chances of you losing money go down drastically. To download your FREE Report called, “The 7 Ways To Lose Money With Bonds”, check out: http://www.retirementthinktank.com/bondreport Now bonds have traditionally been viewed as a very safe way to create a steady stream of cash flow, and many brokers and financial advisors recommend bonds as part of a solid balance to any financial portfolio. And all of that is true…most of the time. The big issue with bond risk (and how people lose money with bonds) is when any of these 7 risk factors arise. And even worse, when any of the 7 risks combine at the same time, it can prove catastrophic. I will give you a basic review of the 7 different ways to lose money in bonds here: 1. Lack of Liquidity in bonds – Although the bond market is larger than the stock market in total value, there are far fewer bond traders and bond investors comparatively speaking. So when issues arise with a certain bond (like a city or municipality defaulting on their bonds, bankruptcy, etc), it can leave the average investor high and dry with no one to sell their bond to. 2. Interest Rate Fluctuations – Bond prices are inversely related to interest rates, so when interest rates rise, bond prices (the price that you buy and sell bonds) goes down. And with interest rates close to all-time lows today, this is a bubble just waiting to pop once interest rates start rising. And if they rise quickly, watch out bond prices! 3. Bond Creditworthiness – This is an important issue as the creditworthiness of the bond issuer determines the yield, and thus your risk/return. For instance, you might not get a great return on a United States Treasury bond, but you can sleep at night knowing there is little chance it will default. On the other hand, you can get hundreds of times more yield on a low-grade junk bond, but the chances of you losing money (or even all of your investment) go up significantly compared to a US Treasury bill. 4. Inflation / Hyperinflation – Generally speaking, inflation usually means higher interest rates. And since we know that interest rates are inversely related to bond prices, high inflation can destroy the value of your bond. Not to mention, in times of inflation the cost of everything (consumer goods) is going up, while your bond investment doesn’t. So higher inflation could render your bond interest negative after you factor inflation into the equation. 5. Reinvestment Risk – This risk pertains to the opposite issue of the others in that it occurs in times of a slowing economy, or a declining interest rate environment. When interest rates go down, bond investors are forced to reinvest their bond interest (and any return of principal) into new securities that will have lower rates of return. Of course this will reduce the overall income that is being generated by your bond portfolio. 6. Bond Fund “Backfire” – Bond funds have traditionally been considered very safe as they spread the bond risks out amongst many different bonds (versus an individual bond). And this is usually the case. However, bond funds can “backfire” when a bond manager starts replacing bonds as they mature in a rising interest rate environment. And if the bond portfolio loses enough value that investors start leaving the fund in droves, then the bond manager might have to start unloading high yielding bonds to meet the early redemption's. This doesn’t happen that often, but when it does, it is painful to all involved. 7. Making Bad Bond Assumptions – Finally, don’t ever make the assumption that your bond or bond fund is free of risk and can just cruise on auto-pilot without you ever having to review or check up on. This is where many bond investors get into trouble by thinking they can buy it and forget about it. Stay educated on what is going on with your bond, watch interest rates, and don’t chase bond yields! Finally, always get the advice of a licensed bond specialist to make sure that you never get burned by any of these bond risks. To download your FREE “7 Ways To Lose Money With Bonds” Report, go to http://www.retirementthinktank.com/bondreport Disclaimer: Nothing in this video or free report can be or should be construed as investment advice. This is purely educational and there is not enough information in here or the report to make educated investment decisions. Always consult with a financial advisor before making any investment decisions.
Views: 129597 Retirement Think Tank
Taxable Corporate Bonds vs Municipal Bonds (Tax Exempt/Non-taxable) After Tax/Equivalent Formula
 
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In this tutorial/lesson I teach you how to compare taxable bonds such as corporate bonds with non-taxable or tax exempt bonds such as municipal bonds. Investors should always invest in the bond that provides the highest after tax return whether it is a corporate bond vs a municipal bond, corporate bond vs tax exempt bond, taxable bond vs tax free bond, taxable bond vs non taxable bond etc.. I show you how to do this by teaching you the after tax rate of return formula, the equivalent taxable return formula, and the cut-off tax bracket formula.
Views: 4256 Subjectmoney
Realized Compound Return (bonds) - What is the definition and formula? - Finance Dictionary
 
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http://www.subjectmoney.com Realized Compound Return - The realized compound return is the rate of return that one would earn if all coupon payments were reinvested. Example Let's assume that we purchased a bond for $900 that has exactly 3 years until maturity. This bond has a face value of $1000 and annual coupon payments of $100. We will be receiving our first coupon payment one year from today. Now let's assume that the reinvestment rate is different than the coupon rate. Let's assume that the reinvestment rate it 9%. Ok so we already know that we are receiving $1000 in a final payment for the bond and we know that we spent $900 for this bond. Now we need to figure out how much we will receive from reinvesting our payments at 9% for the next 3 years. We will then add that amount to the $1000 payment of the face value to find out what our total realized return will be 3 years from now. First let's find out what our payments will be worth if reinvested at 9% 100(1.09^2) + 100(1.09) + 100 = $327.81 If we reinvest our coupon payments at 9% then they will be worth $327.81 3 years from today at maturity. We know we will also be receiving the payment for the face value of $1000 at maturity so 3 years from today our investment will be worth the face value plus the reinvestment of the coupon payments. $1000 + $327.81 = $1327.81. Remember that we paid $900 for this bond so we just need to figure out the rate of return that $900 is earning to be worth $1327.81 3 years from today. $900(1+ r)^3 = $1327.81 The best way to calculate this would be to use your financial calculator. N=3 I/Y = ? PV= ($900) PMT = 0 FV= $1327.81 Now you would just compute the I/Y to get your Realized Compound Return Realized Compound Return = 13.84% Reinvestment Rate Risk Reinvestment rate risk is the uncertainty surrounding the reinvestment rate of the coupon payments. If rates were to rise then the market value of the bond would lose value however the reinvestment rate that the coupon payments could earn would go up, so there is a tradeoff. If rates were to drop then the market value of the bond would go up but the rate at which the coupons could be reinvested would go up. https://www.youtube.com/user/Subjectmoney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AS_5_VLGmxo
Views: 15303 Subjectmoney
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 235192 Khan Academy
Khan Academy - Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Khan Academy on Bond Prices and Interest Rates
Views: 149400 Jonathan Horn
8. Value a Bond and Calculate Yield to Maturity (YTM)
 
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Download Preston's 1 page checklist for finding great stock picks: http://buffettsbooks.com/checklist Preston Pysh is the #1 selling Amazon author of two books on Warren Buffett. The books can be found at the following location: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982967624/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0982967624&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=EOHYVY7DPUCW3WD4 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1939370159/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1939370159&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=XRE5CA2QJ3I2OWSW In this lesson, we began to understand the important terms that truly value a bond. Since most investors will never hold a bond throughout the entire term, understanding how to value the asset becomes very important. As we get into the second course of this website, a thorough understanding of these terms is needed. So, be sure to learn it now and not jump ahead. We learned that there are two ways to look at the value of a bond, simple interest and compound interest. As an intelligent investor, you'll really want to focus on understanding compound interest. The term that was really important to understand in this lesson was yield to maturity. This term was really important because it accounted for almost every variable we could consider when determining the true value (or intrinsic value) of the bond. Yield to Maturity estimates the total amount of money you will earn over the entire life of the bond, but it actually accounts for all coupons, interest-on-interest, and gains or losses you'll sustain from the difference between the price you pay and the par value.
Views: 345593 Preston Pysh
Sequence of Return Risk and Interest Rates vs. Total Returns
 
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Sequence of return risk is among the largest mistakes non-professionals and math-oriented investors make regarding personal financial planning. These folks conflate AVERAGE investment returns with a annual, year over year, investment returns. And you just can't do that. Let me explain. You look at the S&P 500 and see that it has averaged say 10% a year since 1926. Thus you think if you invest in the S&P500 you can safely withdraw 6% a year and you will still add 4% a year to your capital base. $100,000 in the SP 500 allows you to withdraw $6,000 and the next year you have $104,000 in your account. Using average returns over time, this actually makes sense. But reality isn't 'average'. In reality, the SP 500 has years like 2000, 2001 and 2002 when it was down 9%, 11% and 22% respectively. In this case, your $100,000 fell to $91,000 in 2000. Then you withdrew $6000 and now your investment was down to $85,000. The following year, your $85,000 fell 11% to be down to $75, 650 and once you withdrew your $6,000 you only had around $69,000 left. In 2002, the portfolio fell another 22%, putting you down to $54,000 and when you withdrew $6,000 you were left with less than HALF of what you started with 3 short years earlier. Your $6,000 a year withdrawals are no longer equal to 6% like it was initially, but now you're withdrawing almost 13% a year from your portfolio! No amount of growth from here on out is going to save you. You WILL run out of money! That is sequence of return risk. Even though the market averaged 10% a year, or whatever it was, in any year you could lose your shirt and thus your distribution percentage is WAY higher than can be sustained. This is where the 4% rule becomes important to understand. Because it is the 4% rule that takes into consideration sequence of return risk. Second part of this video, I talk about how interest rates work vs. total return on bonds and bond funds. Interest rates are simply what you get for investing your money into a bond TODAY. I buy a bond today that has a an interest rate(or coupon) of 6% for $100,000. I will then receive $6,000 annually until either the bond matures and I get my $100,000 back. The issuer goes bankrupt, in which case I lose everything. Or the bond is called, kind of like a corporate debt refinance, and I receive the $100,000 back. Now let's say interest rates go down across the economy. That same issuer of the bond I hold now issues new bonds but this time they're only paying 5%. The new bonds also cost $100,000. So, if I were to buy a new bond for $100,000 I'd only get $5,000 a year in interest. Which do you think is more valueable? A bond paying $5,000 or a bond paying $6,000? Well, the $6,000 bond is of course. This means my $6,000 a year bond will command a higher price than the bond that only pays $5,000. But remember I paid $100,000 for each bond. So, in this case, my 6% bond could be sold for MORE than $100,000 because an investor would be willing to pay a premium on that bond in order to get more interest. The investor says something like, "I can pay $100,000 to get $5,000 a year interest, or I can pay $105,000 to get $6,000 a year interest." (There is a mathematical formula to determine the actual value for the 6% bond by the way.) Let's say I sell my 6% bond for $105,000. Now I've made $5,000 in capital gain AND $6,000 in bond interest for a total return of 11%. Whereas if I didn't sell the bond, I'd just get interest of 6%. And that is the difference between the two. But, critical to remember, my 11% total return is only temporary. I can not get 11% total return again. The only reason I was able to pocket that extra $5k was because interest rates went down. They can only go down so far In fact, when they start going up again, my 5% will LOSE value because it's only paying $5,000 when other bonds are paying $6,000. In this case, I'd take a LOSS in order to sell that bond and that loss would offset the capital gain I had before. Finally, at the end of the day, the ONLY return one can correctly assume he will earn on bonds is the interest rate he receives on the day he bought the bond. All other returns, that go into the total return calculation are only temporary. You can not rely on total return of bonds to estimate your potential for a bond investment. You should ONLY use interest rate at the time you purchased. For more information on topics like this, visit my website at www.heritagewealthplanning.com ================================= If you like what you see, a thumbs up helps A LOT. So, give me a thumbs up, please! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE by clicking here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSEzy4i9xrKPoaU9z0_XbmA?sub_confirmation=1 GET MY BOOK: Strategic Money Planning: 8 Easy Ways To Put Your House In Order It's FREE if you're a Kindle Unlimited Subscriber! https://amzn.to/2wKGi50
Real Return Bonds (Part 1 of 2)
 
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Real Return Bonds (Part 1 of 2)
Views: 683 InvestingForMe
How to Calculate Yield to Maturity - YTM  JAIIB Live Class [Hindi]
 
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Yield to maturity (YTM) is the total return anticipated on a bond if the bond is held until the end of its lifetime. Yield to maturity is considered a long-term bond yield, but is expressed as an annual rate. In other words, it is the internal rate of return of an investment in a bond if the investor holds the bond until maturity and if all payments are made as scheduled. ---------------------------------------------------------- GET 3000+ JAIIB PREVIOUS YEAR QUESTIONS, Study Notes, Videos https://goo.gl/M8zMrV ------------------------------------------------------------- GET 4000+ CAIIB PREVIOUS YEAR QUESTIONS, Study Notes, Videos https://goo.gl/QGq6Sc ---------------------------------------------------------- Present value Table: https://photos.app.goo.gl/644fD4y6kn6JrJ9G2 Annuity Table: https://photos.app.goo.gl/i6GPIl5zKHYEk3732 ____________________________________________________________ Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/jaiib.caiib.tests/ ____________________________________________________________ How to Calculate EMI [VIDEO in हिंदी ] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwIDmbT2Tts GET JAIIB PREVIOUS YEAR QUESTIONS APP: Download JAIIB Pro App for Android Now: https://goo.gl/ySSwak Internal Rate of Return: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgcY0vsINtE Yield to Maturity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL7Jn99RIKI Letter of Credit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZG7KVz6ADA ___________________________________________________ Important Question Principles & Practices of banking ___________________________________________________ Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AnaI4QCtrM Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p9BMivJyyg Legal Banking Questions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7N3nBm7E8M Basel 1 Basel 2 Basel 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_sOTObwx7g SARFAESI ACT 2002: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFP--aVBrN8 Joint Liability Group: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwHr4kbYtb4 Self Help Group: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aw2E4wGC6XY Hypothecation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfyMNVKBttY Pledge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeOj8iSo1-E Banking Ombudsman https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk_qkutLzXY Internal rate of return https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgcY0vsINtE Protection to paying banker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5E41Xd9rbs Letter of Credit and Its Types https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZG7KVz6ADA ____________________________________________________________ Download App: https://bit.do/jaiib -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Protection to Collecting Banker NI Act Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Banking JAIIB" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-hiw3njkak -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 56758 Learning sessions
Best Short-Term Investment Options (for high return 🚀)
 
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⁉️ Does this sound familiar: You've got some money sitting around in cash and you want to invest it and make a decent return. BUT 💭 you don't want to tie up your money too long 💭 you don't want to lose it Are there opportunities that even exist in today's low interest environment for short-term investing? There are a ton of you that are in this same situation with money sitting in cash- but you don't know what you options are. Today I am going to talk about this very topic in response to a reader question I received. 💻 My reader, Tien asked "What is the best thing to do with my money for short-term grown when I still want accessibility?" I offered a few tips for Tien: ✳️ Even with low interest rates, keep enough in savings for emergencies ✳️ Don't be tempted by short-term growth ✳️ Peer-to-peer lending is not a short-term investment ✳️ Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) - They are low cost and offer a variety of options. Keep an emphasis on short-term bond ETFs in the 1-3 year range. You can get all the detailed information on each of these options in the video. 😉 ➡️ You can start your Betterment account here: https://www.goodfinancialcents.com/resources/betterment-youtube-invest-10k.php ★☆★ Want More Good Financial Cents? ★☆★ 💻 Check out my blog here: https://www.goodfinancialcents.com/ Listen to my podcast here: 🎙 https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/good-financial-cents-podcast-investing-building-wealth/id775107294?mt=2 Pick up my best selling book, Soldier of Finance, here: 📗 http://amzn.to/2xOH78V Connect with me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jjeffrose My most favorite inspiration T-shirt line, Compete Every Day: 👕 https://www.goodfinancialcents.com/compete
Face value, Coupon and Maturity of Bonds - SmarterWithMoney
 
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Investing in bonds can be tricky in today's market. Understanding the fundamental concepts associated with bonds is a good place to start.
Views: 22149 Religare
Understanding the yield curve
 
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You read about it a lot in the business pages, and it sounds super complicated. But the yield curve is dead easy to read. Especially if you've every played chutes and ladders (snakes and ladders in the UK)
Views: 51858 Marketplace APM
9. Yield Curve Arbitrage
 
01:15:08
Financial Theory (ECON 251) Where can you find the market rates of interest (or equivalently the zero coupon bond prices) for every maturity? This lecture shows how to infer them from the prices of Treasury bonds of every maturity, first using the method of replication, and again using the principle of duality. Treasury bond prices, or at least Treasury bond yields, are published every day in major newspapers. From the zero coupon bond prices one can immediately infer the forward interest rates. Under certain conditions these forward rates can tell us a lot about how traders think the prices of Treasury bonds will evolve in the future. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Defining Yield 09:07 - Chapter 2. Assessing Market Interest Rate from Treasury Bonds 35:46 - Chapter 3. Zero Coupon Bonds and the Principle of Duality 50:31 - Chapter 4. Forward Interest Rate 01:10:05 - Chapter 5. Calculating Prices in the Future and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 49979 YaleCourses
Stocks, Bonds & Investments : Types of Corporate Bonds
 
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Most types of corporate bonds only differ in the rate of return and the duration of the bond. Find out how the credit rating of the company that issues the bond affects the rate of return with information from an investments manager in this free video on investing. Expert: Gregory Bramwell-Smith Bio: Gregory Bramwell-Smith is the relationship and portfolio manager at Bramwell-Smith Associates. Filmmaker: David Pakman
Views: 888 ehowfinance
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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This narrated PPT describes how a zero coupon bond works, along with an example of how to calculate the yield to maturity. We contrast the yield to maturity with the bond equivalent yield.
Views: 22089 Elizabeth Schmitt
The yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Annual Interest Varying with Debt Maturity. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/corp-bankruptcy-tutorial/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 142609 Khan Academy
Bonds - Coupon and Market Rates Differ
 
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Lesson discussing how the value of a bond changes when coupon rates and market rates differ. Looks at why a bond will trade at a premium, discount, or at par For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 3437 Harpett
How to find the Expected Return and Risk
 
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Hi Guys, This video will show you how to find the expected return and risk of a single portfolio. This example will show you the higher the risk the higher the return. Please watch more videos at www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning !
Views: 183124 I Hate Math Group, Inc
What is a yield curve? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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MoneyWeek’s Tim Bennett explains yield curves – what are they? who uses them? and what they can tell you about the economy? Related links… - The basics of bonds - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqTjNU7mQZQ Bonds basics part two – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVcDCsHF_HY Retail bonds: Watch this before you buy one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIFHNzTGeXM How to choose a broker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS5MEvq_gcs An introduction to financial markets https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOwi7MBSfhk - What are options and covered warrants? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3196NpHDyec - What are futures? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwR5b6E0Xo4 MoneyWeek videos are designed to help you become a better investor, and to give you a better understanding of the markets. They’re aimed at both beginners and more experienced investors. In all our videos we explain things in an easy-to-understand way. Some videos are about important ideas and concepts. Others are about investment stories and themes in the news. The emphasis is on clarity and brevity. We don’t want to waste your time with a 20-minute video that could easily be so much shorter. We’ve already made over 200 financial videos and we add more each week. You can see the full archive here at MoneyWeek videos.
Views: 149619 MoneyWeek
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
57:37
When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
How Will Higher Interest Rates Affect High Yield Bonds?
 
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May 28 -- Franklin Templeton Fixed Income Group Senior Vice President Eric Takaha discusses the bond markets. He speaks on “Market Makers.” -- Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 4006 Bloomberg
Bond Valuation part 1
 
32:10
Views: 94816 Rahul Malkan
Introduction to present value | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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A choice between money now and money later. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/present-value-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/time-value-of-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 742720 Khan Academy
FIN 300 - Internal Rate of Return (IRR) Overview - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN300 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin300.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University ADMS 3530 - York University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 45704 AllThingsMathematics
Bonds & Yields in Hindi - Part 1 (बॉन्ड्स और  यील्ड)
 
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This video introduces the concept of Bonds. What are bonds and why are they issued. What is a bond, meaning and information of bonds in Hindi. बॉन्ड्स क्या होते है, बॉन्ड्स और बॉन्ड मार्किट की जानकारी, बॉन्ड्स का अर्थ, बॉन्ड्स ट्रेडिंग और बॉन्ड यील्ड. बॉन्ड या बॉन्ड्स (Bonds) एक प्रकार का ऋण होता है. इसे एक प्रकार का उधार पत्र भी कह सकते है. इसे आमतौर पर किसी देश की सरकार के द्वारा जारी किया जाता है.
Views: 23217 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 33845 Zions TV
High Return Investments-Stocks,Bonds and High Return Savings
 
00:53
High Return Investments-Stocks,Bonds and High Return Savings http://investment-uk.co.uk Top UK Investments Offers Guide and Tips. Advice and guide on investing in stocks and share, gold, ISAs, and property in the U.K. For Full Information visit to - http://investment-uk.co.uk small inv. high returns in uk 2012 best returns on investment investment-uk.co.uk investment systematic risks best penny stocks under 5 dollars for 2012 penny shares tips best investment trusts property investments uk property investments uk is good to invest right now on penny stocks market? top 10 investment companies offshore high yield certificate of deposit hsbc ftse all share prices penny boards uk best investment return penny stock brokers 2012 uk penny stock trading broker uk penny stocks safe investments uk 2012 safe investments uk 2012 penny stocks best 10 year investment uk penny stock to watch uk best investment options uk best investment choices for 2012 penny stocks best investment online tips inuk safe investment options 2012
Views: 304 Jakob tomas

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