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Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Static Routing Overview (Floating, AD, Next-hop) .31
 
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Thirty-First Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In the previous video, we looked at our options and compared static routing and dynamic routing. In this video, we dive deeper into understanding static routing First, we go over a few essential elements of static routing. Such as understanding when you use next-hop IPs Vs. local interfaces within your IP Route statements. We discussed the difference between broadcast and non-broadcast networks and why this plays a big part in our static route creation. Then moved onto reviewing floating statics, where we can use the increase in AD to allow a static route to take over if a more preferred route is lost. We investigated recursion, what this is and how it can affect our routing decisions. We lastly jumped into packet tracer, reviewed a small network and added static routing to ensure end-to-end reachability, along with testing our some of the theory we went over i.e. understanding recursion Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 5628 Ryan Beney
6.0 Static Routing - CCNA 2 Chapter 6: Static Routing
 
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Lesson Objectives: Explain the advantages and disadvantages of static routing. Explain the purpose of different types of static routes. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 static routes by specifying a next-hop address. Configure an IPv4 and IPv6 default routes. Configure an IPv4 and IPv6 summary network address to reduce the number of routing table updates. Configure a floating static route to provide a backup connection. Explain how a router processes packets when a static route is configured. Troubleshoot common static and default route configuration issues.
Views: 46149 Astrit Krasniqi
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Static and Dynamic Routing .30
 
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Thirtieth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In the previous video, we discovered why routing was needed, in this video we look at the two options we have to achieve end-to-end reachability. First, we talk about Static routing, understanding when and why you’ll use it along with some examples of the configuration and verification commands. We said static routing is used in a small basic designs and can be used to achieve traffic engineering. After static routing we went into Dynamic routing, comparing this to static, understanding the different between IGP and EGP plus reviewing some basic RIP configuration We know now why routing is needed, what options we have and how they help us achieve connectivity. In this video we'll focus on implementing some of the basic routing then dive deeper into route selection Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6006 Ryan Beney
Juniper Firewall Config,  SRX firewall lab config,SRX firewall network configuration,EVE-NG firewall
 
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Juniper Firewall Config, SRX firewall lab config,SRX firewall network configuration,EVE-NG firewall | Step by Step Juniper Junos Firewall configuration on EVE-NG. In this video we are going to configure Untrust, Trust and DMZ network using Juniper SRX firewall. Juniper Firewall Config through EVE-NG is very convenient and robust. SRX firewall lab config through EVE-NG fis very simple so that any can configure Untrusted, Trusted and DMZ network using Junier JunOS SRX firewall through EVE-NG. SRX firewall network configuration the way I have shown so everyone will understand if they watch this video fully. EVE-NG firewall Inside, Outside and DMZ or Untrusted, Trusted and DMZ network configuration using Juniper SRX firewall. In this video I have shown step by step juniper junos firewall SRX network configuration and as welll as that juniper firewall configuration step by step. How to configure juniper srx firewall. Juniper SRX Initial Configuration Get Started through basic SRX interface configurations. Juniper SRX firewall up and running from factory default settings. Juniper SRX security appliance is a Next-Generation Firewall appliances that is focused on application inspection using Unified Threat Management services. We have a range of basic to advanced topics that will show you how to deploy the Juniper SRX appliance step by step in a simple and practical implementation. Steps are given below that how to configure juniper SRX firewall Untrusted, trusted and DMZ network: Untrust, Trust and DMZ Network Configuration Using Juniper SRX firewall: cli show interfaces terse configure set system root-authencation plain-text new password: root123 repeat : root123 commit set interface ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.139.3/24 set interface ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.50.1/24 set interface ge-0/0/2 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.60.1/24 commit set security zones security-zone untrust interfaces ge-0/0/0.0 host-inbound-traffic system-services ping set security zones security-zone trust interfaces ge-0/0/1.0 host-inbound-traffic system-services ping set security zones security-zone DMZ interfaces ge-0/0/2.0 host-inbound-traffic system-services ping NAT configuration: Create a source NAT rule set. [edit security nat source] set rule-set SRX from zone trust set rule-set SRX from zone DMZ set rule-set SRX to zone untrust Configure a rule that matches packets and translates the source address to the address of the egress interface. [edit security nat source] set rule-set SRX rule SRX match source-address 0.0.0.0/0 set rule-set SRX rule SRX match destination-address 0.0.0.0/0 set rule-set SRX rule SRX then source-nat interface Configure a security policy that allows traffic from the trust zone to the DMZ zone. [edit security policies from-zone trust to-zone DMZ] set policy SRX match source-address any destination-address any application any set policy SRX then permit Configure a security policy that allows traffic from the DMZ zone to the trust zone. [edit security policies from-zone DMZ to-zone trust] set policy SRX match source-address any destination-address any application any set policy SRX then permit Default route configuration to have internet connection: set routing-options static route 0.0.0.0/0 next-hop 192.168.139.2
JunOS Lap 9 Filter-Based Forwarding Eng.Haitham Elkot
 
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Filter-Based Forwarding set firewall family inet filter AAA term 1 from source-address 172.25.0.0/24 set firewall family inet filter AAA term 1 then routing-instance ISP_A set firewall family inet filter AAA term 2 from source-address 172.25.1.0/24 set firewall family inet filter AAA term 2 then routing-instance ISP_B set interfaces ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet filter input AAA set routing-instances ISP_A instance-type forwarding set routing-instances ISP_A routing-options static route 0.0.0.0/0 next-hop 172.20.0.2 set routing-instances ISP_B instance-type forwarding set routing-instances ISP_B routing-options static route 0.0.0.0/0 next-hop 172.20.1.2 set routing-options interface-routes rib-group inet DDD set routing-options rib-groups DDD import-rib inet.0 set routing-options rib-groups DDD import-rib ISP_A.inet.0 set routing-options rib-groups DDD import-rib ISP_B.inet.0
Views: 374 Haisam El Kot
Route Target Import and Export | Extending VRF's Across the Core | VRFs Part 3
 
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Route Target Import and Export | Extending VRF's Across the Core | VRFs Part 3 It's great that we can segregate our customers into virtual routing tables using VRF's. But how do we enable this across many routers? It would be difficult to manually configure VRFs on each router. Imagine the time and effort spent on this task! Instead, we can use MP-BGP (Multiprotocol BGP) to tag each route as they're shared. These tags are called route-targets. Now routes can be exported out of a VRF on one router, shared with another router through BGP, and then imported into the correct VRF. While we're on the topic, how do routes stay unique in the BGP database? VRF's can also be given a tag, called a route-distinguisher, which accomplishes this task. In this video, we'll see how to configure route distinguishers and route targets to keep customer routes unique. We'll also see how to share routes across a core network. Maybe we'll even see a little introduction to MPLS! This includes a lab you can follow along with. You can download the labs, and practice on your own if you want (Patreon). https://networkdirection.net/VRF+Lab+3 Part 1: VRF Lite - The Fundamentals of how VRF's work. This covers route separation, why you need it, and how it's configured https://youtu.be/D0IT6ZKY3tg Part 2: Dynamic Routing - Taking it a step further, we see how to add OSPF, EIGRP, and BGP routing, all while keeping it VRF-aware https://youtu.be/7RtoNTK-mgE Part 3: Route Targets - VRF's are local to each router. But, we can use route-targets and MP-BGP to share routes between VRF's on different routers. The ed result? VRF's are spanned across your network! https://youtu.be/dW8JjcINgDg Part 4: Route Leaking - VRF's keep routes separate, but what if you have some important services to share? How do you share the routes then? With Route Leaking! https://youtu.be/GeIfsVPs4o0 https://www.youtube.com/c/networkdirection https://twitter.com/NetwrkDirection https://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/NetworkDirection
Views: 2271 Network Direction
Static and Dynamic Routing - CompTIA Network+ N10-007 - 1.3
 
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Network+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/007course Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/007cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - A network administrator has many options for configuring and maintaining the routing table between layer 3 devices. In this video, you’ll learn about static routing, dynamic routing, and default routes. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 11382 Professor Messer
Source Routing 2.0. Why Now, Why Again?
 
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Nick Slabakov, Juniper Networks Traditional source routing using IP header options was never widely deployed due to security concerns. Recent buzz around Segment Routing (a.k.a. SPRING) has re-invigorated interest in source routing technologies and their potential benefits. For many operators however, moving to SPRING represents a significant change in their operating practices, so in a more incremental approach they are implementing SPRING-inspired designs using current technologies with minor augmentations. In this talk we will review SPRING/SR, but will mainly focus on using existing protocols for achieving similar benefits. We will discuss: - clever usage of static LSPs to achieve predictable label values in a data-center network - minor enhancements to BGP-LU for more resilient EPE (Egress Peer Engineering) - interoperability considerations between SPRING and non-SPRING domains - See more at: https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog64/agenda#sthash.m3U6Z3nz.dpuf
Views: 3118 TeamNANOG
Static and Dynamic Routing - CompTIA Network+ N10-006 - 1.9
 
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CompTIA has RETIRED the N10-006 exam series! See NEW CompTIA Network+ videos: http://professormesser.link/007course Network+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/n10006 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/n10006cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - Routing tables can be created automatically or through manual configurations. In this video, you’ll learn the differences between static and dynamic routing. - - - - - Download entire video course: http://professormesser.link/006vdyt Get the course on MP3 audio: http://professormesser.link/006adyt Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 47113 Professor Messer
How to Filter using Null Interface
 
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This demo show how to block network traffic without using Access Lists
Views: 2753 Networking Lab
Tutorial: Options for Blackhole and Discard Routing
 
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Speakers: Wayne Gustavus, Verizon Joe Soricelli, Juniper This intermediate-level tutorial offers attendees a view of some common practices for operating a blackhole service. As security concerns abound in the Internet, operators and providers are constantly exploring methods for protecting their networks and customers. During this intermediate-level tutorial we assume that attendees have basic IGP and BGP networking skills. We then build on this basic knowledge by discussing announcement methods for blackholing traffic across the network. In addition, some options for counting and logging the discarded traffic are discussed. Throughout the tutorial, operational and configuration commands from multiple vendors are used to illustrate the tutorial concepts. A brief outline of the material follows: Assumptions Discard options Static route to null Discard interface Mapping addresses to blackhole services BGP advertisements Communities Multihop options Altering next hop Injecting routes Dedicated server Accepting routes from customers Accepting routes from peers Accounting and Counting Options Filters ACLs Counters Syslog Logging Who to discard? Attacks from customers Attacks to customers Unallocated address space (bogons?) Attacks from peers See more at: https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog32/agenda
Views: 239 TeamNANOG
How VRFs Work (VRF Lite) | VRFs Part 1
 
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How VRFs Work (VRF Lite) | VRFs Part 1 VRFs, or Virtual Routing and Forwarding, are virtual routing tables. They enable separation of one part of the network from another. There could be many reasons to do this. It could be for security, to separate the inside network from the DMZ. Or, it could be to separate BU's, or separate customers from each other. This video explains VRF basics, what they are used for, when they are used, and how they work. This includes two labs you can follow along with. The first lab starts at the beginning and shows basic VRF configuration to separate two customers. The second lab shows how you can use VRFs to force traffic through a firewall for security purposes. You can download the labs, and practice on your own if you want (Patreon). https://networkdirection.net/VRF+Lab+1 Part 1: VRF Lite - The Fundamentals of how VRF's work. This covers route separation, why you need it, and how it's configured https://youtu.be/D0IT6ZKY3tg Part 2: Dynamic Routing - Taking it a step further, we see how to add OSPF, EIGRP, and BGP routing, all while keeping it VRF-aware https://youtu.be/7RtoNTK-mgE Part 3: Route Targets - VRF's are local to each router. But, we can use route-targets and MP-BGP to share routes between VRF's on different routers. The ed result? VRF's are spanned across your network! https://youtu.be/dW8JjcINgDg Part 4: Route Leaking - VRF's keep routes separate, but what if you have some important services to share? How do you share the routes then? With Route Leaking! https://youtu.be/GeIfsVPs4o0 For more information, have a look at https://networkdirection.net/VRF+Lite https://www.youtube.com/c/networkdirection https://twitter.com/NetwrkDirection https://www.patreon.com/NetworkDirection
Views: 7214 Network Direction
Extended ping & trace route command  (D-3)
 
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Using cisco Extended ping and trace route command
Views: 2432 Aditya Gaur
Large Scale BGP and route manipulation lab: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.6:  Answers Part 1: OSPF config AS 65000
 
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GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2JjtYh6 This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is a standardized exterior gateway protocol designed to exchange routing and reachability information among autonomous systems (AS) on the Internet. The protocol is classified as a path vector protocol. The Border Gateway Protocol makes routing decisions based on paths, network policies, or rule-sets configured by a network administrator and is involved in making core routing decisions. BGP may be used for routing within an autonomous system. In this application it is referred to as Interior Border Gateway Protocol, Internal BGP, or iBGP. In contrast, the Internet application of the protocol may be referred to as Exterior Border Gateway Protocol, External BGP, or eBGP. BGP neighbors, called peers, are established by manual configuration between routers to create a TCP session on port 179. A BGP speaker sends 19-byte keep-alive messages every 60 seconds to maintain the connection. Among routing protocols, BGP is unique in using TCP as its transport protocol. When BGP runs between two peers in the same autonomous system (AS), it is referred to as Internal BGP (iBGP or Interior Border Gateway Protocol). When it runs between different autonomous systems, it is called External BGP (eBGP or Exterior Border Gateway Protocol). Routers on the boundary of one AS exchanging information with another AS are called border or edge routers or simply eBGP peers and are typically connected directly, while iBGP peers can be interconnected through other intermediate routers. Other deployment topologies are also possible, such as running eBGP peering inside a VPN tunnel, allowing two remote sites to exchange routing information in a secure and isolated manner. The main difference between iBGP and eBGP peering is in the way routes that were received from one peer are propagated to other peers. For instance, new routes learned from an eBGP peer are typically redistributed to all iBGP peers as well as all other eBGP peers (if transit mode is enabled on the router). However, if new routes are learned on an iBGP peering, then they are re-advertised only to all eBGP peers. These route-propagation rules effectively require that all iBGP peers inside an AS are interconnected in a full mesh. How routes are propagated can be controlled in detail via the route-maps mechanism. This mechanism consists of a set of rules. Each rule describes, for routes matching some given criteria, what action should be taken. The action could be to drop the route, or it could be to modify some attributes of the route before inserting it in the routing table.
Views: 736 David Bombal
Intro to JunOS: Routing (RIP, OSPF, BGP)
 
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In this video we'll look at basic Juniper JunOS commands and routing using rip, ospf and bgp. Hope you enjoy,
Views: 10934 Victor
EdgeRouter Configuration - Black Hole Routes
 
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This video will show you how to configure Black Hole routes on your EdgeRouter. What is a blackhole route? It is kinda what it sounds like. When you create a blackhole route your router will stop packets destined for that network from leaving and drop them. To create a blackhole route log into your EdgeRouter. Click the Routing tab. On the Routes page click the + Add Static Route. On the Select Route Type select Black Hole. Fill in the destination network you want to Black Hole. Here we will block 8.0.0.0/8 and see if we can resolve dns using 8.8.8.8. Hmm... Looks like the traffic isn't getting there. Let's ping it! Nothing! Ok, let's remove the route and see what happens. That is how Black Hole routes work! Also, this is the first video with my new video format, tell me what you think!
Views: 3489 Willie Howe
CCNA 200-125 R&S - Module 3 - Lesson 3 - Routing Fundamentals - COMPLETE VIDEO COURSE.
 
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CCNA 200-125 R&S - Module 3 - Lesson 3 - Routing Fundamentals - COMPLETE VIDEO COURSE. BY KEVIN WALLACE. Module 3 - IP Routing. Lesson 3 - Routing Fundamentals. TO BUY CCNA 200-125 LAB WORKBOOK PLEASE CLICK BELOW LINK: https://amzn.to/2t0qfe4. TO BUY CCNA Routing and Switching ICND-I Exam 100-105 BY CISCO PRESS PLEASE CLICK BELOW LINK: https://amzn.to/2K1qAI2 TO BUY CCNA Routing and Switching ICND-II Exam 200-105 BY CISCO PRESS PLEASE CLICK BELOW LINK: https://amzn.to/2lfue36 TO BUY CCNA Routing and Switching Exam 200-125 STUDY GUIDE BY CISCO PRESS PLEASE CLICK BELOW LINK: https://amzn.to/2tmMQSg In this Lesson we will learn about the following: - ROUTING FUNDAMENTALS: INTRODUCTION - CONFIGURING STATIC ROUTES FOR IPv4 - CONFIGURING STATIC ROUTES FOR IPv6 - OVERVIEW OF ROUTING PROTOCOLS - ADMINISTRATIVE DISTANCE - SPLIT HORIZON - METRIC - NEXT HOP ADDRESS - PASSIVE INTERFACES
CCIE R&S: Routing with ISIS : Redistribution into IS-IS
 
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CCIE R&S: Routing with ISIS : Redistribution into IS-IS In the world of IP Routing Protocols much attention is given to RIP, EIGRP, OSPF and BGP. But often, a fifth option, IS-IS, is overlooked and remains a shadowy protocol that intimidates network engineers. This course goes into the details of how IS-IS (Intermediate System to Intermediate System) operates and will remove any trepidation you may feel about it. By drawing frequent comparisons between IS-IS and OSPF, you will learn such topics as; the differences between Level-1 and Level-2 Intermediate Systems, types of IS-IS Link State Packets, how they differ, and what they are used for, LSP Leaking, Pseudonodes, the usage of IS-IS areas, Filtering and Summarization with IS-IS and much, much more. By the time you are finished with this course you will be well-prepared to answer any questions about IS-IS you may encounter on certification exams. If you would like to view the entire course, visit www.ine.com to sign up for an All Access Pass! http://streaming.ine.com/c/ccie-rs-routing-with-isis
Views: 3310 INEtraining
Hop Vs TTL,  2 Routers  = 3 Hops
 
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2 Routers means 3 Hops router ttl hop relation record 17 59 5220 08 2016
Views: 387 Nitin Ahuja
Routing & Switching Essentials -  Lecture 07 - Part 1 (Chapter 06)
 
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Chapter 6: Static Routing 00:10 Review 02:04 6.2.2.4 PT - Configuring IPv4 Static and Default Routes 6.2.2 Configure IPv4 Default Routes 16:30 6.2.2.1 Default Static Route 6.2.3 Configure IPv6 Static Routes 26:20 6.2.3.1 The ipv6 route Command 28:19 6.2.3.2 Next-Hop Options 28:46 6.2.3.3 Configure a Next-Hop Static IPv6 Route 30:04 6.2.3.4 Configure a Directly Connected Static IPv6 Route 30:25 6.2.3.5 Configure a Fully Specified Static IPv6 Route 32:43 6.2.3.6 Verify IPv6 Static Routes 6.2.4 Configure IPv6 Default Routes 33:04 6.2.4.1 Default Static IPv6 Route 33:36 6.2.4.2 Configure a Default Static IPv6 Route 33:44 6.2.4.3 Verify a Default Static Route 34:05 6.2.4.4 PT - Configuring IPv6 Static and Default Routes 6.3.1 Classful Addressing 40:45 6.3.1.1 Classful Network Addressing 42:07 6.3.1.4 Classful Addressing Waste 6.3.2 CIDR 42:45 6.3.2.1 Classless Inter-Domain Routing 01:19:18 6.3.2.2 CIDR and Route Summarization 01:20:10 6.3.2.3 Static Routing CIDR Example 01:21:10 6.3.3.3 VLSM in Action 6.4.1 Configure IPv4 Summary Routes 01:23:58 6.4.1.1 Route Summarization 01:24:07 6.4.1.2 Calculate a Summary Route 01:25:04 6.4.1.3 Summary Static Route Example 01:28:12 6.4.1.4 Activity - Compute the Summary Network Address
Views: 536 Mohamed Haggag
Junos Understanding Route Filters
 
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Junos Understanding Route Filters
Views: 1300 Simon Bingham
Windows command line networking: route
 
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This is a video on two common uses of the command route. Route allows you to see your computers routing table. That's the table that your computer uses to decide if information on the network is addressed to it. The route command can also help your computer decide how to route packets when there are two directions that it can go to connect to other networks. commands used route print route add 10.0.0.0 mask 255.0.0.0 192.168.0.110 route delete 10.0.0.0 mask 255.0.0.0 192.168.0.110 Providing training videos since last Tuesday. http://www.technoblogical.com Thanks for watching.
Views: 115361 Chris Walker
Routing Metrics - CompTIA Network+ N10-006 - 1.9
 
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CompTIA has RETIRED the N10-006 exam series! See NEW CompTIA Network+ videos: http://professormesser.link/007course Network+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/n10006 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/n10006cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - The calculation of a routing metric is different across operating systems and routing protocols. In this video, you’ll learn some of the characteristics that our routing protocols use to prioritize one route over another. - - - - - Download entire video course: http://professormesser.link/006vdyt Get the course on MP3 audio: http://professormesser.link/006adyt Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 39347 Professor Messer
Two-way redistribution using tags: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.5: ROUTE Exam: Answers Part 1
 
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GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2LznpFx This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? If you configure two-way redistribution at multiple points in your network, you can introduce routing loops. One way to stop the redistribution of already redistributed routes is to use route tags. In two-way multipoint redistribution labs, route tags should be applied and filtered in both direction and on al routers performing redistribution. For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com The use of a routing protocol to advertise routes that are learned by some other means, such as by another routing protocol, static routes, or directly connected routes, is called redistribution. While running a single routing protocol throughout your entire IP internetwork is desirable, multi-protocol routing is common for a number of reasons, such as company mergers, multiple departments managed by multiple network administrators, and multi-vendor environments. Running different routing protocols is often part of a network design. In any case, having a multiple protocol environment makes redistribution a necessity. Differences in routing protocol characteristics, such as metrics, administrative distance, classful and classless capabilities can effect redistribution. Consideration must be given to these differences for redistribution to succeed When you redistribute one protocol into another, remember that the metrics of each protocol play an important role in redistribution. Each protocol uses different metrics. For example, the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) metric is based on hop count, but Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) use a composite metric based on bandwidth, delay, reliability, load, and maximum transmission unit (MTU), where bandwidth and delay are the only parameters used by default. When routes are redistributed, you must define a metric that is understandable to the receiving protocol. There are two methods to define metrics when redistributing routes. If a router is running more than one routing protocol and learns a route to the same destination using both routing protocols, then which route should be selected as the best route? Each protocol uses its own metric type to determine the best route. Comparing routes with different metric types cannot be done. Administrative distances take care of this problem. Administrative distances are assigned to route sources so that the route from the most preferred source will be chosen as the best path.
Views: 823 David Bombal
Static Routing And Debug Lab For CCNA And CCNP Candidates (Part 3)
 
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In the third and final part of our look at static routing, we'll configure a static host route and test our connectivity with pings and debugs. We'll also remove a static route and demonstrate options for these routes. Excellent troubleshooting and debug demos for CCNA and CCNP candidates. When you're done here, visit http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/Tutorials.htm for over 250 free Cisco certification tutorials, videos, practice exams, and more! To your success, Chris Bryant CCIE #12933 http://www.thebryantadvantage.com
Views: 9876 Chris Bryant
Two-way redistribution using tags: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.5: ROUTE Exam: Answers Part 2
 
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GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2LznpFx This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? If you configure two-way redistribution at multiple points in your network, you can introduce routing loops. One way to stop the redistribution of already redistributed routes is to use route tags. In two-way multipoint redistribution labs, route tags should be applied and filtered in both direction and on al routers performing redistribution. For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com The use of a routing protocol to advertise routes that are learned by some other means, such as by another routing protocol, static routes, or directly connected routes, is called redistribution. While running a single routing protocol throughout your entire IP internetwork is desirable, multi-protocol routing is common for a number of reasons, such as company mergers, multiple departments managed by multiple network administrators, and multi-vendor environments. Running different routing protocols is often part of a network design. In any case, having a multiple protocol environment makes redistribution a necessity. Differences in routing protocol characteristics, such as metrics, administrative distance, classful and classless capabilities can effect redistribution. Consideration must be given to these differences for redistribution to succeed When you redistribute one protocol into another, remember that the metrics of each protocol play an important role in redistribution. Each protocol uses different metrics. For example, the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) metric is based on hop count, but Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) use a composite metric based on bandwidth, delay, reliability, load, and maximum transmission unit (MTU), where bandwidth and delay are the only parameters used by default. When routes are redistributed, you must define a metric that is understandable to the receiving protocol. There are two methods to define metrics when redistributing routes. If a router is running more than one routing protocol and learns a route to the same destination using both routing protocols, then which route should be selected as the best route? Each protocol uses its own metric type to determine the best route. Comparing routes with different metric types cannot be done. Administrative distances take care of this problem. Administrative distances are assigned to route sources so that the route from the most preferred source will be chosen as the best path.
Views: 799 David Bombal
Two-way redistribution using tags: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.5: ROUTE Exam: Answers Part 3
 
08:12
GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2LznpFx This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? If you configure two-way redistribution at multiple points in your network, you can introduce routing loops. One way to stop the redistribution of already redistributed routes is to use route tags. In two-way multipoint redistribution labs, route tags should be applied and filtered in both direction and on al routers performing redistribution. For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com The use of a routing protocol to advertise routes that are learned by some other means, such as by another routing protocol, static routes, or directly connected routes, is called redistribution. While running a single routing protocol throughout your entire IP internetwork is desirable, multi-protocol routing is common for a number of reasons, such as company mergers, multiple departments managed by multiple network administrators, and multi-vendor environments. Running different routing protocols is often part of a network design. In any case, having a multiple protocol environment makes redistribution a necessity. Differences in routing protocol characteristics, such as metrics, administrative distance, classful and classless capabilities can effect redistribution. Consideration must be given to these differences for redistribution to succeed When you redistribute one protocol into another, remember that the metrics of each protocol play an important role in redistribution. Each protocol uses different metrics. For example, the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) metric is based on hop count, but Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) use a composite metric based on bandwidth, delay, reliability, load, and maximum transmission unit (MTU), where bandwidth and delay are the only parameters used by default. When routes are redistributed, you must define a metric that is understandable to the receiving protocol. There are two methods to define metrics when redistributing routes. If a router is running more than one routing protocol and learns a route to the same destination using both routing protocols, then which route should be selected as the best route? Each protocol uses its own metric type to determine the best route. Comparing routes with different metric types cannot be done. Administrative distances take care of this problem. Administrative distances are assigned to route sources so that the route from the most preferred source will be chosen as the best path.
Views: 582 David Bombal
RIP & routing table basics using Packet Tracer - Part 1
 
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http://danscourses.com - The basics of RIP and routing tables, demonstrated using Packet Tracer for the Cisco CCNA
Views: 211737 danscourses
Routing & Switching Essentials -  Lecture 06 - Part 2 (Chapter 06)
 
01:23:35
Chapter 6: Static Routing 00:10 6.1.1.2 Why Use Static Routing? 16:15 6.1.1.3 When to Use Static Routes 19:19 6.1.1.4 Identify the Advantages and Disadvantages of Static Routing 6.1.2 Types of Static Routes 25:30 6.1.2.1 Static Route Applications 27:31 6.1.2.2 Standard Static Route 28:15 6.1.2.3 Default Static Route 30:17 6.1.2.4 Summary Static Route 23:57 6.1.2.5 Floating Static Route 6.2.1 Configure IPv4 Static Routes 35:41 6.2.1.1 ip route Command 57:06 6.2.1.2 Next-Hop Options 59:44 6.2.1.3 Configure a Next-Hop Static Route 01:02:02 6.2.1.4 Configure a Directly Connected Static Route 01:08:27 6.2.1.5 Configure a Fully Specified Static Route 01:11:26 6.2.1.6 Verify a Static Route
Views: 521 Mohamed Haggag
EdgeSwitch Configuration - VLANs, VLAN Routing, Routing - Part 2 - EdgeRouter Configuration
 
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EdgeSwitch Configuration - VLANs, VLAN Routing, Routing Between Networks - Part 2 - EdgeRouter Configuration. In this video you will see how create the interface and routes to be able to get the networks on your EdgeSwitch out to the Internet.
Views: 16844 Willie Howe
Large Scale BGP and route manipulation lab: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.6:  Can you complete the lab?
 
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GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2JjtYh6 This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is a standardized exterior gateway protocol designed to exchange routing and reachability information among autonomous systems (AS) on the Internet. The protocol is classified as a path vector protocol. The Border Gateway Protocol makes routing decisions based on paths, network policies, or rule-sets configured by a network administrator and is involved in making core routing decisions. BGP may be used for routing within an autonomous system. In this application it is referred to as Interior Border Gateway Protocol, Internal BGP, or iBGP. In contrast, the Internet application of the protocol may be referred to as Exterior Border Gateway Protocol, External BGP, or eBGP. BGP neighbors, called peers, are established by manual configuration between routers to create a TCP session on port 179. A BGP speaker sends 19-byte keep-alive messages every 60 seconds to maintain the connection. Among routing protocols, BGP is unique in using TCP as its transport protocol. When BGP runs between two peers in the same autonomous system (AS), it is referred to as Internal BGP (iBGP or Interior Border Gateway Protocol). When it runs between different autonomous systems, it is called External BGP (eBGP or Exterior Border Gateway Protocol). Routers on the boundary of one AS exchanging information with another AS are called border or edge routers or simply eBGP peers and are typically connected directly, while iBGP peers can be interconnected through other intermediate routers. Other deployment topologies are also possible, such as running eBGP peering inside a VPN tunnel, allowing two remote sites to exchange routing information in a secure and isolated manner. The main difference between iBGP and eBGP peering is in the way routes that were received from one peer are propagated to other peers. For instance, new routes learned from an eBGP peer are typically redistributed to all iBGP peers as well as all other eBGP peers (if transit mode is enabled on the router). However, if new routes are learned on an iBGP peering, then they are re-advertised only to all eBGP peers. These route-propagation rules effectively require that all iBGP peers inside an AS are interconnected in a full mesh. How routes are propagated can be controlled in detail via the route-maps mechanism. This mechanism consists of a set of rules. Each rule describes, for routes matching some given criteria, what action should be taken. The action could be to drop the route, or it could be to modify some attributes of the route before inserting it in the routing table.
Views: 1185 David Bombal
Two-way redistribution using tags: GNS3 CCNP Lab 1.5: ROUTE Exam: Can you complete the lab?
 
02:38
GNS3 Portable Project File: https://bit.ly/2LznpFx This is one of multiple Cisco CCNP GNS3 Labs. Are you ready to pass your CCNP exam? If you configure two-way redistribution at multiple points in your network, you can introduce routing loops. One way to stop the redistribution of already redistributed routes is to use route tags. In two-way multipoint redistribution labs, route tags should be applied and filtered in both direction and on al routers performing redistribution. For lots more content, visit http://www.davidbombal.com - learn about GNS3, CCNA, Packet Tracer, Python, Ansible and much, much more. 300-101 ROUTE Exam information: https://bit.ly/2GkcFXQ 300-115 SWITCH Exam information: https://bit.ly/2KrSWIe 300-135 TSHOOT Exam information: https://bit.ly/2IlHpgY Training: http://www.davidbombal.com The use of a routing protocol to advertise routes that are learned by some other means, such as by another routing protocol, static routes, or directly connected routes, is called redistribution. While running a single routing protocol throughout your entire IP internetwork is desirable, multi-protocol routing is common for a number of reasons, such as company mergers, multiple departments managed by multiple network administrators, and multi-vendor environments. Running different routing protocols is often part of a network design. In any case, having a multiple protocol environment makes redistribution a necessity. Differences in routing protocol characteristics, such as metrics, administrative distance, classful and classless capabilities can effect redistribution. Consideration must be given to these differences for redistribution to succeed When you redistribute one protocol into another, remember that the metrics of each protocol play an important role in redistribution. Each protocol uses different metrics. For example, the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) metric is based on hop count, but Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) use a composite metric based on bandwidth, delay, reliability, load, and maximum transmission unit (MTU), where bandwidth and delay are the only parameters used by default. When routes are redistributed, you must define a metric that is understandable to the receiving protocol. There are two methods to define metrics when redistributing routes. If a router is running more than one routing protocol and learns a route to the same destination using both routing protocols, then which route should be selected as the best route? Each protocol uses its own metric type to determine the best route. Comparing routes with different metric types cannot be done. Administrative distances take care of this problem. Administrative distances are assigned to route sources so that the route from the most preferred source will be chosen as the best path.
Views: 1046 David Bombal
MikroTik Static Route
 
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การทำ Static แบบง่ายๆ บนเราท์เตอร์โอเอส (RouterOS)
Views: 21931 amnuay pintong
Quick Configs - BGP Aggregate Advertise-Map (as-filter list)
 
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This CCIE oriented episode of quick configs goes into configuring an Advertise-Map for BGP aggregation. See http://bit.ly/1VZYkFi for all CCIE notes.
Views: 501 Ben Pin
CCNPv7 ROUTE - Lab 2-2: EIGRP Stub Routing (Leak Maps, TLVs, Route Maps, and Stubs)
 
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***AUDIO ISSUE FIXED - THANK YOU DUANE @ FT. GORDON*** In this video tutorial on EIGRP stub routing we dive into the deep end of how to configure the "stub" feature on a Cisco router. We start with the base EIGRP configuration and then progress through each and every "stub" option (connected, leak-map, receive-only, redistributed, static, and summary) with an in-depth look at the debug output of the HELLO packets to see the Type Length Value (TLV) settings for each. We then explore the use of Leak Maps and wrap up the tutorial with a reconfiguration of our stub router using EIGRP named mode with the same settings. Hope you enjoy!
Views: 1616 Travis Bonfigli
CCNP ROUTEv7 Lab 7-1: Configuring BGP Default Gateways & Distribute Lists - 05.23.2015
 
01:36:15
The following video tutorial walks you through a real-world scenario with the International Travel Agency (ITA) and their BGP configuration between two different Service Providers (SPs). This tutorial is based on Lab 7-1 of the CCNPv7 ROUTE course material. An in-depth look of the default-originate, distribute-list, and floating static configuration for the ITA enterprise is taken with a focus on the different use cases for a small-to-medium enterprise connecting to two different SPs. Enjoy!
Views: 2616 Travis Bonfigli
4. Static IPv6 Address Assignments
 
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CCNA BOOST Chap 12. All About IPv6
Views: 614 System Engineer
Juniper BGP Lab 2
 
45:52
Views: 1882 Sam Akinwande
Demo 4.3 - PIM Sparse Mode on Junos Routers Part 1
 
01:22:12
In this CCIE and JNCIE IP Multicast demo we cover PIM Sparse Mode on Junos routers in detail, using detailed packet captures. Please download the topology file from https://www.dropbox.com/sh/124zmocrwp26fyv/AAAFJD5ueH6AIdjJF9SiZv79a?dl=0 to follow along with the videos. The scenarios covered include: - IGMP signaling Multicast Receivers present without any Multicast Sources (PIM Sparse Mode (*,G) Joins for the Rendezvous Point Tree (RPT) terminating at the RP (Rendezvous Point) - Source signaling by the Multicast Source (MC message reception by the FHR) but no Multicast Receivers present ((S,G) states on the FHR and the RP via the PIM Sparse Mode (PIM-SM) Register message) PIM Sparse-Mode topics relevant to CCIE and JNCIE candidates include: - PIM Sparse Mode(Protocol Independent Multicast Sparse-mode) neighbor discovery mechanism - How does PIM-SM (PIM Sparse Mode) use Hello messages to exchange TLV options - PIM-SM (Protocol Independent Multicast Sparse Mode) Hello message format and options important to CCIE and JNCIE candidates: -- Hold Time for dead neighbor discovery -- Generation ID (GenID) for PIM Sparse Mode (PIM-SM) Graceful Restart -- DR Priority for PIM Sparse Mode (PIM-SM) Designated Router (DR election) - How PIM-SM (PIM Sparse Mode) Designated Router (DR) election process - Why is the DR (Designated Router) election important to PIM-SM (PIM Sparse Mode) - How do the RP and the LHRs signal (S,G) and (*,G) states (SPT, RPT) using PIM Join/Prune messages - In depth analysis of the PIM Join/Prune message with packet captures - Structure of the PIM Join/Prune message - How does the LHR signal the (*,G) (Rendezvous Point Tree or RPT) towards the Rendezvous Point (RP) - The contents of the PIM Join message containing the (*,G) or RPT signaling - How does the LHR populate the various fields of the PIM Join/Prune (*,G) message - What are the Wildcard (WC) and RPT bits and what is their meaning in a PIM (*,G) Join message - How does PIM leverage the same basic Join/Prune message in PIM Sparse Mode to signal both (S, G) and (*,G) trees - How do the Middle Hop Routers (MHRs) process the PIM Join/Prune messages) - The final state of the (*,G) tree on all the routers along with the identification of IIF (Incoming Interface) and the OIL (Outgoing Interface List) - How an FHR communicates to the Rendezvous Point about an active (S,G) multicast source - The PIM (Protocol Independent Message) Registration process - The contents of the PIM Register message - The concept of the PIM Null-Register message in PIM Sparse Mode - The contents of the PIM Null-Register message in PIM Sparse Mode - The concept of the PIM Register-Stop message in PIM Sparse Mode - The contents of the PIM Register-Stop message in PIM Sparse Mode - PIM Register message packet format deep dive - PIM Register tunnel concept in PIM Sparse Mode - How the PIM Register Tunnel is a Multipoint-to-Point tunnel in PIM Sparse Mode - How the Rendezvous Point (RP) react to the receipt of a PIM Register Message in PIM Sparse Mode
Views: 1731 Decoding Packets
MPLS Filtering (advertised, received, host-routes, prefix-suppression)
 
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This CCIE oriented episode of quick configs goes into configuring filtering for MPLS. See http://bit.ly/1VZYkFi for all CCIE notes.
Views: 360 Ben Pin
Lecture -7 Internet Routing Protocol Part -I
 
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Lecture Series on Internet Technologies by Prof.I.Sengupta, Department of Computer Science & Engineering ,IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 150947 nptelhrd
Understanding BGP Regular Expressions
 
27:53
REGEX Examples _100_ - Passes/passed through AS 100 ^100$ - Directly connected to AS 100 (begins and ends in AS 100 _100$ - Originated in AS 100 ^100_ - Networks behind AS 100 ^[0-9]+$ - AS Paths that is one AS long ^([0-9]+)(_\1)*$ - Networks originating in neighboring AS, with possible prependings ^$ - Networks originating in LOCAL AS .* - Matches everything
Quick Configs - eBGP Peering (multihop, ttl-security, connected-check)
 
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This CCIE oriented episode of quick configs goes into configuring different peering options for BGP. See http://bit.ly/1VZYkFi for all CCIE notes.
Views: 480 Ben Pin
Configure Routing for Windows Server 2008
 
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Windows Server 2008 R2 can operate as a fully functional router. If you are planning to use Window Server 2008 R2 as a VPN server understanding the routing component will help you set up your server. Otherwise windows server 2008 can work as a router saving you the cost of having to purchase a router for your network.
Views: 120067 itfreetraining
CCNP ROUTE Bulldog DVD Preview 1:  IP Fundamentals
 
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Get immediate access to every video on my CCNP ROUTE DVD - over 22 hours of world-class instruction - when you get your DVD at http://bit.ly/oOfXWj! That course includes my famous BGP videos - the clearest explanation of BGP you'll ever see! No 3-minute samples here - I've posted an entire hour of my CCNP ROUTE DVD right here for you to watch! Here's part 1, where we'll cover the fundamentals of IP routing, split horizon, administrative distance, and more! This particular section is not heavy on lab work, since we need to cover the fundamentals before we dive in to the labs - and there are plenty of those in the next two videos! Thanks for making TBA part of your CCNP success story! Chris Bryant CCIE #12933 "The Computer Certification Bulldog" [email protected] Website: http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ccie12933 Facebook: http://on.fb.me/gPq52d Blog: http://thebryantadvantage.blogspot.com/ YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/ccie12933
Views: 678 Chris Bryant
Juniper Routing Information Protocol RIPv2 Lab 1
 
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Instant Download now available at the following link for Juniper Series 1: http://bowlercbtlabs.fetchapp.com/sell/amohrish In this video I configure and explain the following: -The basic principles RIPv2 -How to manipulate the RIP metric for proper traffic flow -Use show commands to verify proper RIPv2 operation -How to advertise networks into RIPv To purchase this video and many more like it go to: http://stores.ebay.com/Bowler-CBT-Labs http://www.bowlercbtlabs.com
Views: 2026 bowlersp