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ch. 14 Resource Demand
 
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This screencast has been created with Explain Everything™ Interactive Whiteboard for iPad PowerPoints by McConnell, Brue and Flynn
Views: 1107 Maria Papapavlou
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 445539 CrashCourse
Resource Demand - an Introduction & Brief Analysis
 
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Captured by [email protected] The first of a two-parter devoted to an analysis of demand in resource markets.
Views: 2852 Kyle Purpura
Introduction to Resource Markets and Marginal Revenue Product
 
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Demand for a factor of production by a firm reflects the same inverse relationship with the factor's price as demand for a good or service. But there's a bit more to the theory of resource demand. This lesson introduces resource markets and "marginal revenue product", which determines how much of a resource a firm will demand at every quantity. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 3228 Jason Welker
Supply and Demand: Crash Course Economics #4
 
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In which Adriene Hill and Jacob Clifford teach you about one of the fundamental economic ideas, supply and demand. What is supply and demand? Well, you’ll have to watch the video to really understand it, but it’s kind of important for everything economically. Supply and demand sets prices, and indicates to manufacturers how much to produce. Also, it has a lot to do with strawberries. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1431796 CrashCourse
BBI - Economic Resources, Supply & Demand
 
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Created with TechSmith Snagit for Google Chrome™ http://goo.gl/ySDBPJ
Views: 552 R Sharma Lakhan
Changes in Resource Demand and Individual versus Market Demand for Labor
 
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This lesson introduces the factors that can cause demand for a resource to change and explains how the market demand for a resource is the sum of all the demands of the individual firms hiring that resource. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 938 Jason Welker
Factors Affecting Demand.
 
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Transcript: Let’s imagine we are all consumers. What makes us want to buy more apples or fewer apples? Prices. At $2, we’ll say, nah, it’s too expensive. Let’s just get 1. But if the price drops to $1, we’ll say, cool, let’s get 3 apples now. Tastes and preferences. Hey, I saw an advert today. Apples are good for health. All of a sudden, I want to buy more apples. When tastes shift towards apples, demand for apples increases. Price of complements. We say goods are complements of each other when they are normally bought together. For example, printer and ink cartridges. Or bread and jam. If bread gets cheaper, what happens to our demand for jam? Well, bread gets cheaper, we buy more bread, so we’ll buy more jam. Price of substitutes. Substitutes are goods that are bought for the same purpose. For instance, Pepsi and Coke are substitutes. When price of Pepsi drops, we’ll start to think, hey, let’s buy fewer cans of Coke and switch to Pepsi. They are the same thing anyway. So when price of Pepsi drops, demand for coke decreases. Income. You know, we all have this lust for material stuff? And we think that when we make more money, we are going to buy more of this and this and that? These type of goods are called normal goods. When our income increases, we want to get more normal goods like cars. There’s another category of goods called inferior goods. For example, food from roadside stalls. Perhaps your income increases and think, this food is inferior! You have more money, you want to eat in a restaurant now. When our income increases, we demand fewer inferior goods. Expectation of prices. “There’s a drought going on in Thailand. Shortage of rice in the near future is expected”. Crap, no rice? Man, I think price of rice is going to increase. Better go buy and stock up some rice now. So if we think future prices of rice will increase, our demand for rice today increases. Population. When the number of people on an island increases, the demand for houses increases. When population increases, demand for something will increase. So this is the summary. But hey, there are so many factors affecting demand. I’m getting confused. How do I graph the demand curve? If you like this video, remember to like and subscribe. Next up: The demand curve. _____________________________________________________
Views: 36062 Economics Mafia
The Demand Curve
 
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Transcript: In the demand curve, we are trying to find out what’s the relationship between price and the quantity that is demanded. Let’s make it really simple by keeping everything else constant. That means ceteris paribus, given everything else constant. Let’s freeze them! Wow, only price and quantity left. With these 2 variables, we can draw 2 axes. The convention is to put the price on the vertical axis and quantity on the horizontal axis. Remember, as consumers, we want to stretch our dollar. At $2, eww, apples are expensive, we’ll only get 1 apple. (pause) But at $1, woah, apples are cheaper now, we’ll get 3 apples. Then we connect the dots. Tada, the demand curve! Note-- it’s downward sloping. When price increases, quantity demanded decreases. When price decreases, quantity increases. The arrows are always in opposite directions. This is the law of demand: there’s an inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded, ceteris paribus, given everything else constant. Why? First, it’s because of substitution effect. When apples get more expensive, we substitute apples with something else, like oranges. So we buy fewer apples. There’s also the income effect. Given the same income, when apples get more expensive, our purchasing power erodes. We feel our wallets shrinking. Remember the summary from the previous video? Why did I state quantity demanded here and demand here? What’s the difference? If you like this video, remember to like and subscribe. Next up: Change in quantity demanded vs change in demand _____________________________________________________ Why is the demand curve downward sloping? Because there's an inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded. Why is there an inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded? Why does price and quantity demanded change in opposite directions? Why price increases, why does quantity demanded decrease? Well, it's because of the substitution effect and income effect. When the price of apple increases, for example, we tend to substitute apples with some other similar goods like oranges. In addition, when price increases, our purchasing power drops. With the same amount of money, we can now buy fewer goods. So our real income decreases and we purchase fewer goods. This is called the income effect. The law of demand states that there is an inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded. The higher the price, the fewer the number of people willing and able to buy a good. Hence, the demand curve slopes downwards. The gradient of the curve is negative.
Views: 14227 Economics Mafia
Demand and Supply Explained- Econ 2.1
 
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Thanks for watching. In this video I explain the law of demand, the substitution effect, the income effect, the law of diminishing marginal utility, and the shifters of demand. Make sure that you understand the difference between a change in quantity demanded and a change in demand. This is the first video in the unit Playlist. Make sure that you watch the the next two videos about supply and equilibrium so you can put it all together. I hope that you like this video. Please like, leave a comment, and subscribe. *Note* never drink a whole gallon of milk Get the Ultimate Review Packet- http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Supply Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewPNugIqCUM Video Explaining Shifting the Curves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0tIOqU7m-c Unit playlists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQkVO2PsxFw Learn it by watching Indiana Jones https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RP0j3Lnlazs
Views: 1394409 Jacob Clifford
8. Economics of Energy Demand
 
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MIT 15.031J Energy Decisions, Markets, and Policies, Spring 2012 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/15-031JS12 Instructor: Richard Schmalensee License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 10265 MIT OpenCourseWare
AP Micro: Unit 7 Screencast 2 - MRP is the Demand Curve for a Resource
 
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Main Topics: MRP as the demand for a resource, the impact of different types of product markets on resource markets, the determinants of resource demand, the Marginal Productivity Theory of Income Distribution, and the Lorenz curve. To download a copy of the screencast notes click https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1jooazFI9pHkj03_V86kObtTHkY2b3RVWFEM0VPaAL4Y/edit?usp=sharing.
The Income and Substitution Effect - WHY does Demand Slope Downwards?
 
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So the law of demand tells us that there's an inverse relationship between a good's price and the quantity demanded. In this video we learn WHY this relationship exists. More resources for economics students and teachers at econclassroom.com
Views: 911 Jason Welker
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 273613 CrashCourse
Allocative efficiency and marginal benefit | Microeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Marginal Utility and maximization Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/microeconomics/choices-opp-cost-tutorial/production-possibilities/v/economic-growth-through-investment?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=microeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/microeconomics/choices-opp-cost-tutorial/production-possibilities/v/increasing-opportunity-cost?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=microeconomics Microeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory microeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Microeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_6zQ54DjQJdLodwsxAsdZg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 315841 Khan Academy
Resource Demand
 
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Microeconomics-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 217 Arian Ramaj
Lecture 2 (Economics of Natural Resources)
 
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Moving from preferences/tastes to utility to demand. Elasticities (water v. gold), shifts and slides in demand. The conundrum of taxing an essential good (economically efficient but politically unpopular).
Views: 6758 David Zetland
Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: Everyone FROM: Martin To gild refined gold is just silly. TO: Dana FROM: Cameron Still holding out. We're going to make it! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Raymond Cason, Marcel Pogorzelski, Cowgirlgem, Chua Chen Wei, Catherine Emond, Victoria Uney, Robin Uney, Damian Shaw, Sverre Rabbelier Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1441513 CrashCourse
Micro Economics - Natural Resource Supply and Demand - Question 13
 
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Follow the link below for the question in this video: http://www.csun.edu/bus302/Lab/SampleExams/microsample1.htm Follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn: https://twitter.com/devonpscoombs https://www.linkedin.com/in/devoncoombs Tutor of the video: Julius Loredo https://www.linkedin.com/in/julius-loredo-45b637b6 Like Our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/businesscoretutoring Please subscribe to my channel :)
Public vs. Private Goods
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will be introduced to the difference between public and private goods and how this applies to environmental conservation. Concepts include excludability, rivalry, public goods, private goods, collective goods, and common goods/common pool resources. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
The Circular Flow Model of a Market Economy
 
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By this point in your course you may have learned the definition of a market: A place where buyers and sellers meet to engage in mutually beneficial exchanges. But what is a market economy? Two basic types of markets exist in any market economy: resource markets and product markets. The exchanges that take place in these markets benefit both the households and the firms that engage in exchanges. This lesson will introduce the circular flow of money, resources and goods and services in a market economy. We will examine how resources flow from households to firms, and goods and services from firms to households. We will also seek to explain why individuals are willing to engage in the exchanges that characterize the market system. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 298766 Jason Welker
Resource Demand - Shifts in the Resource Demand Curve
 
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Captured by [email protected] Second in a two-part video devoted to an analysis of demand in resource (factor) markets.
Views: 452 Kyle Purpura
The Law of Demand
 
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Our study of market economies requires us to examine both the demand-side and the supply-side of product and resources markets. Buyers and sellers interact with one another to engage in mutually beneficial exchanges in a market economy, and prices are set based on the demand and supply for a particular good, service or resource. This video lesson presents the law of demand, and explains how the demand curve can illustrate this fundamental economic concept. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 21941 Jason Welker
Introduction to economics | Supply, demand, and market equilibrium | Microeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Basic introduction to what microeconomics and macroeconomics study. A bit on Adam Smith. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/microeconomics/supply-demand-equilibrium/demand-curve-tutorial/v/law-of-demand?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=microeconomics Microeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory microeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Microeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_6zQ54DjQJdLodwsxAsdZg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1771843 Khan Academy
supply demand in equilibrium
 
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How markets resolve surpluses and shortages through price changes (slides along the demand and supply curves). See more videos and economics learning resources at www.dirkmateer.com!
Views: 173539 dmateer
Demand exceeds supply by 20% in “explosive” vanadium market
 
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March 27, 2017 -- Mark Smith, President, CEO, and Director of Largo Resources Ltd. (TSX: LGO | OTCQB: LGORF) in an interview with InvestorIntel’s CEO Tracy Weslosky to discuss the economics and applications of vanadium. The supply of vanadium is 20% lower than the demand for it - “We are virtually on the edge of something very explosive”, says Mark about the metal’s price in response to a rise in demand. Vanadium is a reinforcing super metal and steel is the largest market for it. But because of their top tier product, Largo can tap into the higher end applications (aeronautics for example) at a premium price. Mark can be seen as the keynote speaker at the Cleantech and Technology Metals Summit on May 15-16, in Toronto. Tracy Weslosky: For everybody out there, the reason we’re talking to Mark today is because he’s the CEO of one of the only vanadium producers in the world. Today we’re going to talk to you about vanadium. Mark Smith: Perfect. I love to talk about vanadium. Tracy Weslosky: Well, Mark I actually love vanadium myself. If you could just start real quickly with an introduction to vanadium for those out there that are new to this super metal. Mark Smith: Vanadium is a super metal. Bottom line is it makes steel stronger. Over 50% of the vanadium in the world is used in rebar. I always like to say that cause I think people need to be able to, kind of, touch and feel in their own minds what vanadium actually does. It’s primarily used in rebar and it is used to strengthen steel. It’s in a lot of the car bodies and chassis. It’s in tools because you have to have a very strong tool to do chipping or chiseling or something like that or a hammer. Those are the primary uses and it’s got all kinds of specialty applications as well. A lot of it depends on purity levels of your vanadium. That’s the story right now I think is purity levels. Tracy Weslosky: I think the story would also be the increase in the price for vanadium. Yes? Mark Smith: Yeah. It’s more than doubled in less than 12 months. If you take a look at the supply and demand fundamentals in the world right now it would appear as if supply is about 20% below the demand level. That’s making very conservative assumptions on the demand level. If there’s any little uptick in demand at all, that spread just becomes worse and worse. You couple that supply and demand information with inventory information, which we’ve been plotting for 10 to 15 years now, and the inventory information suggests that we’ve been digging into inventory to meet the difference between supply and demand for over 6 years now, it’s our opinion that there’s very little inventory in the world…to access the full interview, click here Disclaimer: Largo Resources Ltd. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel
Views: 2391 InvestorIntel
Costs of Production- Microeconomics 3.3 (Part 1)
 
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In this video I explain the costs of production including fixed costs, variable costs, total cost, and marginal cost. Make sure that you know how to calculate the per unit costs: AVC, AFC, and ATC. Let me know what you think and please subscribe. Get the Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Next video-drawing the cost curves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYKJdooEnwU Watch Episodes of Econmovies- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH More videos about the costs of production- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE70CA726102FB294
Views: 727758 Jacob Clifford
Derived Factor Demand without math
 
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Notes for Economics www.saseassociates.com A short animation of deriving a market equilibrium to find the constant taken competitive price. Setting Marginal Cost equal to competitive price of the firm solves for profit-maximizing quantity*. Using a production function for labor the Total Product and Marginal Product are determined for quantity* at N*, the optimal input of labor. In the competitive factor market for labor, a constant Wage is found. Calculating the Marginal Revenue of Product for labor as the Marginal Physical Product times the Marginal Revenue and setting is against the labor supply at fixed wage, the Marginal Factor Cost of Labor, the optimal input of Labor, N*, is determined.
Views: 265 Video Economist
The Law of Demand - HD
 
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Our study of market economies requires us to examine both the demand-side and the supply-side of product and resources markets. Buyers and sellers interact with one another to engage in mutually beneficial exchanges in a market economy, and prices are set based on the demand and supply for a particular good, service or resource. This video lesson presents the law of demand, and explains how the demand curve can illustrate this fundamental economic concept. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 42086 Jason Welker
production theory: cost-minimizing input choice (optimal input mix)
 
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This videos describes how to produce a given level of output by choosing the cost-minimizing quantities of labor and capital inputs.
Views: 77416 1sportingclays
Fiscal Policy and Stimulus: Crash Course Economics #8
 
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In which Jacob and Adriene teach you about the evils of fiscal policy and stimulus. Well, maybe the policies aren't evil, but there is an evil lair involved. In this episode we learn how government use taxes and spending influence the economy. Sometimes the government gives, and sometimes it takes. And the giving and the taking can have a profound effect on how economies behave. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 807143 CrashCourse
Factors Market Demand Curve
 
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Explains why the Demand for Labor or MRP looks the way it does
Views: 233 Tamra Carl
Derived Factor Demand with math
 
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Notes for Economics www.saseassociates.com A short animation of deriving a market equilibrium to find the constant taken competitive price. Setting Marginal Cost equal to competitive price of the firm solves for profit-maximizing quantity*. Using a production function for labor the Total Product and Marginal Product are determined for quantity* at N*, the optimal input of labor. In the competitive factor market for labor, a constant Wage is found. Calculating the Marginal Revenue of Product for labor as the Marginal Physical Product times the Marginal Revenue and setting is against the labor supply at fixed wage, the Marginal Factor Cost of Labor, the optimal input of Labor, N*, is determined.
Views: 431 Video Economist
Episode 11 - Demand
 
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The basics of the buyers' side of the market - what motivates the buyer to purchase (or not)? "Episode 11: Demand" by Dr. Mary J. McGlasson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Views: 227329 mjmfoodie
Economics: Deriving the Factor Demand Curve
 
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http://www.mindbites.com/lesson/7737 for full video. For a full video Economics course, you'll want to click through to http://www.mindbites.com/series/1078-economics-full-course. Also be sure to check out http://www.mindbites.com/category/46-economics for other video lessons on Economics topics and concepts.
Views: 3527 Mindbitesdotcom
Scarcity, Opportunity Cost and the PPC
 
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The basic economic problem is one rooted in both the natural world and in human greed. We live in a world of limited resources, but we seem to have unlimited wants. This results in scarcity, which gives rise to the very field of Economics, which deals with how to allocate scarce resources between the competing wants and needs of society. This lesson will introduce these basic economic concepts, along with the first (and perhaps the most useful) graph an Economics student will learn, the Production Possibilities Curve. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 190620 Jason Welker
The Invisible Hand - Supply & Demand
 
01:27
How does the baker know what we want to eat? How many of each product to make? What to charge for things? Educators can also get a free DVD version of the video, as well as access a full teacher’s guide and other teaching resources by creating a free account at http://www.izzit.org. Subject Areas: ■ Business/Family & Consumer Science ■ Economics ■ World History/Geography ■ Science & Technology Topics: ■ Adam Smith ■ Central Planning ■ eBay ■ Economic Principles ■ Free Market ■ Invisible Hand ■ Prices ■ Scottish Enlightenment ■ Supply & Demand Want more great FREE educational stuff to go with this video? Head over to http://www.izzit.org and grab the full teacher’s guide, use the online quizzes, find additional educational resources and more! Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/izzit Visit our other educational programs here: http://www.izzit.org/products/index.php Make sure you enroll as an izzit.org member to receive your FREE teacher resources, click here to sign up now: http://www.izzit.org/join/index.php You can Tweet at us here: https://twitter.com/izzit_org Find us on Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/izzitorg
Views: 1036 izzitEDU
Film Theory: Black Panther's Economic CRISIS!
 
17:38
2:35 - 2:44: Special shout out to OnlyLeigh (https://www.youtube.com/user/OnlyLeigh) for the use of her avatar! Superman FAILED US! ► http://bit.ly/2FCtH3s SUBSCRIBE for More Film Theories! ► http://bit.ly/1dI8VBH Wakanda's choke hold on Vibranium will be it's downfall! The country refuses to communicate and trade with the the rest of the world and history shows that is a BAD IDEA. How can T'Challa save his people from economic destruction? Well, loyal Theorists, that's what I'm here to solve. MORE FILM THEORIES Jurassic World Was An INSIDE JOB! ► http://bit.ly/2CaTGl1 Is The Emoji Movie ILLEGAL? ►► http://bit.ly/2C900Jw Is Thor STRONGER Than The Hulk? ►► http://bit.ly/2ERwLvH The Tide Pod Challenge - EXPOSED! ►► http://bit.ly/2sEhxFD Disney LIED to You! ►► http://bit.ly/2C8BGaM How Star Wars Theories KILLED Star Wars! ► http://bit.ly/2ocnqVQ Like the theme song and remix for this episode? Thanks to CARF! https://www.youtube.com/user/carfmobile SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @MatPatGT Facebook: facebook.com/GameTheorists Instagram: instagram.com/matpatgt
Views: 4961087 The Film Theorists
Pearl Exchange Activity Full - Demand and Supply
 
33:34
This is a supply and demand activity that explain how the equalibrium price is created and changed. There is also another video introducing the activity. It gives some of the details on how to run it in your classroom: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yd-jCFDhGQ DOWNLOAD the worksheet and Powerpoint for this activity: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3Dwdvkp10uSdDU5UWliQk1OSUk
Views: 13203 Jacob Clifford
The Invisible Hand - Full Video
 
14:37
The Invisible Hand isn’t so invisible after all! The entire global economy boils down to two people: a buyer and a seller. And the system works best when the seller has the buyer’s best interests at heart. But even if the seller is acting strictly in his own interest, good things happen – we get what we want! Over 200 years ago, a Scottish philosopher named Adam Smith came up with revolutionary ideas about how things work. Those ideas are easy to see in the world around us. Visit a bakery in Scotland to witness supply and demand, and to learn how businesses know the prices at which they can sell their products and what they should offer customers. Then go to eBay to see the Invisible Hand in action, showing how economic systems can self-regulate without a “Man of Systems” micro-managing every transaction, and how trust and reputation are critical to sellers. Educators can also get a free DVD version of the video, as well as access a full teacher’s guide and other teaching resources by creating a free account at http://www.izzit.org. Subject Areas: ■ Business/Family & Consumer Science ■ Economics ■ World History/Geography ■ Science & Technology Topics: ■ Adam Smith ■ Central Planning ■ eBay ■ Economic Principles ■ Free Market ■ Invisible Hand ■ Prices ■ Scottish Enlightenment ■ Supply & Demand Want more great FREE educational stuff to go with this video? Head over to http://www.izzit.org and grab the full teacher’s guide, use the online quizzes, find additional educational resources and more! Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/izzit Visit our other educational programs here: http://www.izzit.org/products/index.php Make sure you enroll as an izzit.org member to receive your FREE teacher resources, click here to sign up now: http://www.izzit.org/join/index.php You can Tweet at us here: https://twitter.com/izzit_org Find us on Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/izzitorg
Views: 24329 izzitEDU
Population and Resources - Demand for Resources
 
01:35
A summary of the demand for resources topic. Useful for revising physical geography.
Views: 32 Alana Wheat
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 526373 CrashCourse
Types of Market Failure
 
06:08
This video goes over four types of market failure including externalities, public goods, common resources, and imperfect information. Allowing the market to allocate resources with these characteristics will result in deadweight loss. More information is available on this topic at http://www.freeeconhelp.com/2014/06/types-of-market-failure.html
Views: 10204 Free Econ Help
Supply and Demand (Economics Cartoon for Kids) Educational Video for Students (CN)
 
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Understanding economics is hard for one of the kids from the neighborhood. Watch this educational video for students about supply and demand as a way to introduce young learners to the world of economics. Website: http://www.fresbergcartoon.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fresbergcartoon Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/fresbergcartoon Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/fresbergcartoon -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "U.S. Constitution for Kids (19th Amendment): 19th Amendment/Women's Suffrage Movement (Crash Course)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zD4e1myEOU -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-