Home
Search results “The new englishes journal articles”
Why Did English Become the International Language?
 
07:25
This video explores how English became the global lingua franca. Support Langfocus on Patreon http://patreon.com/langfocus My current Patrons include these fantastic people: Brandon Gonzalez, Pomax, Eric Garland, Andres Resendez Borgia, Adam Fitch, ShadowCrossZero, Zhiyuan 'George' Shi, Michael Arbagi, Trevor Lawrence, Felix, Felixx Ravestein, John Moffat, Auguste Fields, Guillermo Jimenez, Bennett Seacrist, Sidney Frattini Jr, Ruben Sanchez, Michael Cuomo, Brian Michalowski, Sebastian Langshaw, Lorraine Inez Lil, Don Sawyer, Scott Russell, Florian Breitwieser, Fiona de Visser, Raymond Thomas, divad, Justin Faist, Adam Vanderpluym, , Theosophagous, Rui Rizzi, Mike Forster, Christian Langreiter, Shawn MacIntyre, Dmitry Stillerman, Kristoffer Karlsson, Henri Saussure, James Lillis, Edmund McFarlane, Steely Dan Rather, Jens Aksel Takle, yasmine jaafar, Tryggurhavn, Benham Esfahbod, JC Edwards, Ashley Dieroff, Steve Decina, Thomas Mitchell, Mahmoud Hashemi, fatimahl, Kevin Law, David LeCount, Carl saloga, Edward Wilson, Mohammed A. Abahussain, Peter Nikitin, Fred, JL Bumgarner, Rob Hoskins, Thomas McCloud, Ian Smith, Nicholas Gentry, Brent Warner, Kevin J. Baron, Maurice Chou, Matthew C, Caio Fernandes, Suzanne Jacobs, Johann Goergen, Leo Barudi, Piotr Chmielowski, Rich Gerritzen, Mark Kemp, Éric Martin, Marco Antonio Barcellos Junior, Simon Blanchet, Sergios Tsakatikas, Bruno Filippi, Jeff Miller, Ulrike Baumann, Joel Mills, Alex Hanselka, Panot, Don Ross, Carl Bergquist, James and Amanda Sodering, and Robert (Bob) Dobbin. Music: "Marxist Arrow" by Twin Musicom. Outro music: "Gimme Five" by Twin Musicom.
Views: 367408 Langfocus
World Englishes
 
24:00
World Englishes World Englishes is a term for emerging localized or indigenized varieties of English, especially varieties that have developed in territories influenced by the United Kingdom or the United States The study of World Englishes consists of identifying varieties of English used in diverse sociolinguistic contexts globally and analyzing how sociolinguistic histories, multicultural backgrounds and contexts of function influence the use of English in different regions of the world The issue of World Englishes was first raised in 1978 to examine concepts of regional Englishes globally Pragmatic factors such as appropriateness, comprehensibility and interpretability justified the use of English as an international and intra-national language In 1988, at a Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL conference in Honolulu, Hawaii, the International Committee of the Study of World Englishes ICWE was formed In 1992, the ICWE formally launched the International Association for World Englishes IAWE at a conference of "World Englishes Today", at the University of Illinois, USA1 Thereworld englishes, world englishes journal, world englishes by kachru, world englishes pdf, world englishes conference, world englishes articles World Englishes
Views: 14 Speaking Videos
History of the English Language Presentation_1.wmv
 
03:07
References: Tompkins, G.E. (2009). Language Arts: Patterns of Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Moussu, L. & Llurda, E. (2008). Non-native English-speaking English Language Teachers: History and Research. Cambridge University Press, Volume 41:3, pages 315 -- 348.   Putatunda, R. (2012). History of the English Language. Buzzle.com. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com/articles/history-of-the-english-language.html   Hawes, D. (2009). Hawes reviews A Companion to the History of the English Language. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture, Volume No. 54.   Fujimoto-Adamson, N. (2006). Globalization and History of English Education in Japan. Asian EFL Journal, Volume 8(Issue 3), Article 13. Lockerby, P. (2009). A Brief History of The English Language. The Chatter Box. Retrieved from http://www.science20.com/chatter_box/brief_history_english_language   History of the English Language. (2003). In the Danshort.com. Retrieved from http://www.danshort.com/ie/timeline.htm. History of the English Language. (2012). In the EnglishClub.com. Retrieved from http://www.englishclub.com/english-language-history.htm. History of the English Language. (2012). Retrieved June 1, 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_english_language.
Views: 456 Marie O'Connor
What is LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE? What does LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE mean? LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE meaning
 
06:39
What is LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE? What does LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE mean? LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE meaning - LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE definition - LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Linguistic landscape is the "visibility and salience of languages on public and commercial signs in a given territory or region" (Landry and Bourhis 1997:23). Linguistic landscape has been described as being "somewhere at the junction of sociolinguistics, sociology, social psychology, geography, and media studies". It is a concept used in sociolinguistics as scholars study how languages are visually used in multilingual societies. For example, some public signs in Jerusalem are in Hebrew, English, and Arabic (Spolsky and Cooper 1991, Ben-Rafael, Shohamy, Amara, and Trumper-Hecht 2006). Studies of the linguistic landscape have been published from research done around the world. The field of study is relatively recent; "the linguistic landscapes paradigm has evolved rapidly and while it has a number of key names associated with it, it currently has no clear orthodoxy or theoretical core" (Sebba 2010:73). A special issue of the International Journal of Multilingualism (3.1 in 2006) was devoted to the subject. Also, the journal World Englishes published a themed issue of five papers as a "Symposium on World Englishes and Linguistic Landscapes: Five Perspectives" (2012, vol. 31.1). Similarly, an entire issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language (228 in 2014) was devoted to the subject, including looking at signs that show influences from one language on another language. In 2015 an academic journal devoted to this topic was launched, titled Linguistic Landscape: An International Journal, from John Benjamins. There is also a series of academic conferences on the study of linguistic landscape. A comprehensive, searchable Linguistic Landscape Bibliography is available. A 2016 special issue of Manusya (22, 2016) begins with a history and summary of the field. Because "the methodologies employed in the collection and categorisation of written signs is still controversial", basic research questions are still being discussed, such as: "do small, hand-made signs count as much as large, commercially made signs?". The original technical scope of "linguistic landscape" involved plural languages, and almost all writers use it in that sense, but Papen has applied the term to the way public writing is used in a monolingual way in a German city and Heyd has applied the term to the ways that English is written, and people's reactions to these ways. The languages used in public signs indicate what languages are locally relevant, or give evidence of what languages are becoming locally relevant (Kasanga 2012). In many multilingual countries, multilingual signs and packaging are taken for granted, especially as merchants try to attract as many customers as possible or people realize that they serve a multilingual community. In other places, it is a matter of law, as in Quebec, where signs cannot be in English only, but must include French (Bill 101, Charte de la langue française). In Texas, some signs are required to be in English and Spanish, such as warning signs about consuming alcohol while pregnant. In some cases, the signs themselves are multilingual signs, reflecting an expected multilingual readership. In other cases, there are monolingual signs in different languages, written in relevant languages found within a multilingual community. Backhaus even points out that some signs are not meant to be understood so much as to appeal to readers via a more prestigious language (2007:58).....
Views: 1973 The Audiopedia
06 tips to learn and remember a new English Vocabulary daily -- Free English Lessons
 
07:46
06 tips to learn and remember a new English Vocabulary daily -- Free English Lessons The most important thing about learning vocabulary is to use new words and just reading a list of new words would not help. It is essential to remember the new word learnt so here are some tips that will help you to do so. 1) Use the new word in a sentence: After you have read the word and understood its meaning, use the new word in your own sentence. Try to create sentences in context with your daily life. 2) Look for grammatical Variations: Look for various grammatical forms of the new word that u learns. For example the word entice is a verb where as the adjective form is enticing and the adverb is enticingly. Enticed would be the past and past participle of the word entice. Once you have the different grammatical forms you would end up learning many words just with one word. 3) Learn Associations and Connections: Try to associate and connect the word more with the help of the search engines like Google. Look for its synonyms and antonyms. Again this will help you to learn more words connected to the original word you have learnt. 4) Always carry a notepad with you: Write the word, its meaning and a sentence in a small notepad or your smart phone that you can carry it around. Go though these words in your spare time. This will help you to remember it well. 5) Make Flash Cards: Make little flash cards with each new word on one side and the meaning on the other. Put them on the ground and if the meaning is face up try to think of the word or vice versa. 6) Learn the word again before you forget: Don't just learn or practice a word a day and then forget about it. Its important to remember it. Therefore to remember it reuse the word, keep practicing it till it sticks in your long term memory. These six tips would help you to learn and remember new words and therefore increase your vocabulary which eventually would excel your communication skills.
English, a pretext for seeking new ways of seeing policies
 
12:17
The following video is a final research product from English subject called, Content Area Conditions & Nature II, from the School of Education and Pedagogy, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. 2017. Citation: Loaiza-Monsalve, J. & Zapata-Bte, J.D (2017) English, a pretext for seeking new ways of seeing policies [Podcast]. Content Area Conditions & Nature II. School of Education and Pedagogy. Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Medellín (Col.) Podcast References: 1. Canagarajah, A. S. (1999). Resisting linguistic imperialism in English teaching. Oxford University Press. 2. Colombia. Ministerio de Educación Nacional [MEN]. (1994). Ley General de Educación (Ley 115 del 8 de Febrero de 1994) Retrieved from http://www.mineducacion.gov.co/1621/articles-85906_archivo_pdf.pdf 3. Colombia, Ministerio de Educación Nacional [MEN]. (1999). Lineamientos Curriculares de Idiomas extranjeros. Retrieved From. http://www.mineducacion.gov.co/1759/articles-339975_recurso_7.pdf 4. Colombiaaprende.edu.co. (2002). Productos del portal - Revolución Educativa 2002 – 2005. [Online]. Retrieved From: http://www.colombiaaprende.edu.co/html/home/1592/article-91697.html 5. Council, O. E. (2001). Common European framework of reference for languages. 6. Colombiaaprende.edu.co. (2017). Productos del portal - Programa Nacional de Bilingüismo. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.colombiaaprende.edu.co/html/productos/1685/article-158720.html 7. De Colombia, C. P. (1991). Bogotá. DC Editorial Legis SA. 8. Gómez Rodríguez, L.F. (2010). English Textbooks for Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language: Do They Really Help to Develop Communicative Competence? Retrieved from: http://www.scielo.org.co/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0123-12942010000300002 9. Guerrero Nieto, C.E & Quintero Polo, A.H.(2009). English as a Neutral Language in the Colombian National Standards: A Constituent of Dominance in English Language Education. retrieved from: http://revistas.unal.edu.co/index.php/profile/article/view/11447/36800 10. Oxford, R. L. (1990). Language learning strategies (Vol. 210). New York: Newbury House. 11. Pennycook, A. (1994). Incommensurable discourses?. Applied linguistics, 15(2), 115-138. 12. Valencia Giraldo, S. (2006). Literacy practices, texts, and talk around texts: English language teaching developments in Colombia. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, (8), 7-37. 13. Velez–Rendon, G. (2003). English in Colombia: A sociolinguistic profile. World Englishes, 22(2), 185-198.
Views: 12 David Bustamante
Mod-01 Lec-06 World Englishes
 
54:05
English Language and Literature by Dr. Liza Das & Dr. Krishna Barua,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Guwahati.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 1495 nptelhrd
English as a lingua franca
 
25:41
English as a lingua franca is the use of the English language as a Koiné language, "a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages". ELF is also "defined functionally by its use in intercultural communication rather than formally by its reference to native-speaker norms" whereas English as a foreign language aims at meeting native speaker norms and gives prominence to native speaker cultural aspects. While lingua francas have been used for centuries, what makes ELF a novel phenomenon is the extent to which it is used – both functionally and geographically. A typical ELF conversation might involve an Italian and a Dane chatting at a coffee break of an international conference held in Brussels, a Spanish tourist asking a local for the way in Berlin, or a Punjabi Indian negotiating with a Tamil Indian salesperson at Chennai. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1007 Audiopedia
What is SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS? What does SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS mean?
 
04:04
What is SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS? What does SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS mean? SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS meaning - SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS definition - SOCIOHISTORICAL LINGUISTICS explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Sociohistorical linguistics, or historical sociolinguistics, is the study of the relationship between language and society in its historical dimension. A typical question in this field would, for instance, be: "How were the verb endings -s and -th (he loves vs. he loveth) distributed in Middle English society" or "When did people use French, when did they use English in 14th-century England?" Sociohistorical linguistics is a relatively new field of linguistic research which represents a merger of two distinct sub-disciplines of linguistics; sociolinguistics and historical (or diachronic) linguistics. Researchers in this field use sociolinguistic methods to explain historical change. This approach is particularly useful when language-internal data alone is unable to account for some seemingly inexplicable developments. Instead of relying solely upon intra-linguistic evidence and data to explain language change, socio-historical linguists search for extra-linguistic causes of change. One of the seminal works in the field is Romaine (1982)'s Socio-Historical Linguistics. Other studies such as John McWhorter's work, The Missing Spanish Creoles, are more specific in this case examining the extra-linguistic reasons why there are no creoles with Spanish as a lexifier language (as opposed to English, French, Dutch, Portuguese, etc.). Not all linguists believe that sociolinguistic methods can be applied to historical situations. They argue that the sociolinguistic means at our disposal today (e.g. face-to-face interviews, recording of data, large and diverse sampling, etc.) are necessarily unavailable to sociolinguists working on historical developments. They therefore argue that it is exceedingly difficult to do socio-historical linguistics, and that the results will always be suspect due to lack of data and access to native speakers in real-world situations. For those who question the validity of socio-historical linguistics, it is a field of conjecture rather than solid conclusions. Those arguing for the validity of socio-historical linguistics reply that it is better to use what remaining textual evidence is available to begin to posit likely scenarios rather than leave some questions completely unanswered. Methods such as social network theory (cf. Lesley Milroy) that look at human interactions and their effects on the larger society are particularly well-suited to socio-historical research. The first monograph in sociohistorical linguistics, Socio-historical Linguistics; Its Status and Methodology was published by Suzanne Romaine in 1982. The field became established in linguistics in the 1990s. Since 2000 there has also been an internet journal Historical Sociolinguistics and Sociohistorical Linguistics. In 2005 the Historical Sociolinguistics Network (HiSoN) was founded which now is the main scholarly network in the domain, organizing annual summer schools and conferences. Due to the lack of recordings of spoken language, sociohistorical linguistics has to rely exclusively on written corpora.
Views: 86 The Audiopedia
Honors Social Justice Capstone
 
21:58
Critical Race Theory: Stefancic, Jean. Critical Race Theory : The Cutting Edge, edited by Richard Delgado, Temple University Press, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/umkc/detail.action?docID=1210896. Race and genetics: Leroi, Armand Marie, et al. Confusions About Human Races, 7 June 2006, raceandgenomics.ssrc.org/Lewontin/. Race is how others define you/Dalton Conly quote: Conley, Dalton, et al. “Ask The Experts: What Our Experts Say.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-experts-03-02.htm. AAA statement on Race: “AAA Statement on Race.” AAA Statement on Race - Connect with AAA, www.americananthro.org/ConnectWithAAA/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2583. Early “science” of race: “Early Classification of Nature.” RACE - History - Early Classification of Nature, www.understandingrace.org/history/science/early_class.html. Polygenism: “One Race or Several Species.” RACE - History - One Race or Several Species, www.understandingrace.org/history/science/one_race.html. And Kneel, Terence D. “Religion, Polygenism and the Early Science of Human Origins.” Religion, Polygenism and the Early Science of Human OriginsHistory of the Human Sciences - Terence D. Keel, 2013, 2013, journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0952695113482916.http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0952695113482916 Racial Essentialism: Zack, Naomi. “The Philosophical Roots of Racial Essentialism and Its Legacy.” Confluence: Journal of World Philosophies, 2014, scholarworks.iu.edu/iupjournals/index.php/confluence/article/view/522. PBS quote on colonialism, slavery, and popularization of race: “ From Indentured Servitude to Racial Slavery.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part1/1narr3.html. End of Reconstruction Era: “Rebuilding the Old Order.” Ushistory.org, Independence Hall Association, www.ushistory.org/us/35d.asp. Political Ideology switch: Gelman, Andrew. “The Twentieth-Century Reversal: How Did the Republican States Switch to Democrats and Vice Versa?” Columbia University, Department of Statistics, 2014, pp. 1–5. Jim Crow Law: “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States: Jim Crow Era.” Guides, guides.ll.georgetown.edu/c.php?g=592919&p=4172697. Some Of My Best Friends Are Black by Tanner Colby- source for redlining and blockbusting: https://www.amazon.com/Some-Best-Friends-Are-Black/dp/0143123637 Race, Real Estate, Uneven Development by Kevin Fox Gotham-additional source for redlining and blockbusting: https://www.amazon.com/Race-Estate-Uneven-Development-Second/dp/1438449429/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1512443565&sr=1-1&keywords=kevin+fox+gotham American Civil Rights Movement: History.com Staff. “Civil Rights Movement.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 2009, www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-movement. Institutional Racism and other definitions: https://assets.aspeninstitute.org/content/uploads/files/content/docs/rcc/RCC-Structural-Racism-Glossary.pdf Institutional Racism In Public Schools: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nfwb0T1wfyfG-vewuAsQLx0ghcwjw51_/view?usp=sharing War on drugs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJUXLqNHCaI thumbnail taken from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Crow_laws
Views: 45 Maddy Lewis
Interview with Ilona Leki and Rosa Manchon, Editors of the Journal of Second Language Writing
 
04:13
In this interview at the 2010 American Association for Applied Linguistics conference in Atlanta, Rosa and Ilona tell us about focus of the Journal of Second Language Writing and what they feel has contributed to its success. They then discuss their visions for the development of the field and also the journal over the next five years.
Views: 2169 Elsevier Journals
PhD Career Skills: Social Media for Conference Organisers with Scott Midson (artsmethods@manchester)
 
03:50
PhD Career Skills video about using social media when organising an academic conference or event, with Scott Midson ([email protected]). Filming and editing by Dejan Levi
Crime, Language & Forensics Decoded with Jim Fitzgerald & Dr. Natalie Schilling
 
39:27
Explore how language is used in forensic investigations from the anthrax mailings, to voice line-ups, and the investigation of the murder of Daniel Pearl, with Dr. Natalie Schilling and James Fitzgerald. We break down the rape case against Eric Frimpong, and examine how witnesses can misinterpret language to shocking ends, as well as shed light on the misunderstood science of linguistics and the very real impact that it has on crime investigation, in this Crime Time episode hosted by Allison Hope Weiner. GUEST BIO: Dr. Natalie Schilling is an internationally-renowned linguist and an Associate Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University. She is recognized for her research on language variation across cultural groups and is especially well-known for her work on individual language style and stylistic variation. She is an expert on American English dialect variation, has extensive knowledge of variation in World Englishes, and also conducts research on variation in Spanish. Dr. Schilling is currently conducting research on authorial attribution and author profiling. She teaches Forensic Linguistics and Sociolinguistics (Language and Society) at Georgetown University and was a regular instructor in the FBI’s Forensic Linguistic Workshop for Law Enforcement Practitioners, designed and led by AGI Practitioner James R. Fitzgerald. Dr. Schilling also presents on and teaches Forensic Linguistics in various venues in Spain. She has given more than 100 presentations at U.S. and international academic conferences, universities, and training workshops, and has authored numerous academic articles and book chapters. She is co-author of a definitive textbook, American English, and co-editor of the authoritative Handbook of Language Variation and Change. James R. Fitzgerald was the Program Manager of Threat Assessment/Forensic Linguistics at the Behavioral Analysis Unit 1 of the FBI. Fitzgerald knew little about profiling or linguistics when he joined the FBI in 1987. But, while assigned to the field office in New York City, he worked cases involving stalking or threatening letters sent to Jane Pauley, Bryant Gumbel, Don Imus, Donald Trump, and Rush Limbaugh, among others. In 1995, Fitzgerald became a profiler at the FBI Academy at Quantico, Va. As part of Fitzgerald’s profiler training, he learned about analyzing communications. He later obtained a Master’s degree in linguistics from Georgetown University. (This was his second MS. His first was in Organizational Psychology at Villanova University.) As he has at his present company, The Academy Group, Fitzgerald created a linguistic-oriented database of threatening and/or suspicious letters, similar to one the Secret Service maintains.Fitzgerald now works for the Academy Group in Manassas, Va., which provides profiling services for private industry as well as a university instructor, author, and technical advisor for television programs (Criminal Minds) involving the Federal Bureau of Investigation. ADD’L LINKS: http://thelip.tv http://thelip.tv/show/crime-time/ Crime Time Full Episodes Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKVPX6aglvE&list=PLjk3H0GXhhGfIvJXM3emqDXkZ02SXgfgT&index=1 Crime Time Shorts Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnhI_zUHnvs&index=1&list=PLjk3H0GXhhGeC9DbpSnIvd2i9BHh2dBvv https://www.facebook.com/CrimeTimeWithAllisonHopeWeiner?directed_target_id=0 https://www.facebook.com/thelip.tv EPISODE BREAKDOWN: 00:01 Welcoming Jim Fitzgerald and Natalie Schilling to Crime Time. 02:35 2001 Anthrax attacks at the White House recap. 05:17 Profiling the anthrax attacker. 06:36 9/11’s influence on homegrown terror. 07:34 Daniel Pearl, The Wall Street Journal and FBI jurisdiction. 08:54 Eric Frimpong rape case recap. 09:50 Forensic linguistics and the issues with “ear witness” testimony. 14:14 Police voice lineups and factors to skew auditory reliability. 18:42 Examining the other forensic analysis of the crime. 19:26 Bite marks, tooth patterns and forensic odontology. 22:53 Race and keeping with the science. 24:18 Why forensic linguistics matters. 29:57 Linguistic profiling, dialect features and speech patterns. 37:38 Sociolinguistics and dialect regions in the US. 38:30 Thank you and goodbye.
Views: 9032 TheLipTV
Code-mixing
 
09:54
Code-mixing refers to the mixing of two or more languages or language varieties in speech. Some scholars use the terms "code-mixing" and "code-switching" interchangeably, especially in studies of syntax, morphology, and other formal aspects of language. Others assume more specific definitions of code-mixing, but these specific definitions may be different in different subfields of linguistics, education theory, communications etc. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 7087 Audiopedia
Manhattan Night Official Trailer #1 (2016) - Adrien Brody, Jennifer Beals Movie HD
 
02:06
Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn Like us on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/1QyRMsE Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt Manhattan Night Official Trailer #1 (2016) - Adrien Brody, Jennifer Beals Movie HD Based on Colin Harrison's acclaimed novel Manhattan Nocturne (a New York Times Notable Book of the Year), MANHATTAN NIGHT tells the story of Porter Wren (Adrien Brody), a New York City tabloid writer with an appetite for scandal. On the beat he sells murder, tragedy and anything that passes for the truth. At home he is a model family man, devoted to his loving wife (Jennifer Beals). But when a seductive stranger (Yvonne Strahovski) asks him to dig into the unsolved murder of her filmmaker husband Simon (Campbell Scott), he can't resist. In this modern version of a classic film noir, we follow Porter as he is drawn into a very nasty case of sexual obsession and blackmail - one that threatens his job, his marriage, and his life. MANHATTAN NIGHT will be released by Lionsgate Premiere in theaters and On Demand May 20, 2016. Lionsgate Premiere, Grindstone Entertainment Group and 13 Films present in association with Sparkle Roll Media Corporation and Big Indie Pictures a production of Fable House, Untravelled Worlds and DeCubellis Films. The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers channel is your destination for the hottest new trailers the second they drop. Whether it's the latest studio release, an indie horror flick, an evocative documentary, or that new RomCom you've been waiting for, the Fandango MOVIECLIPS team is here day and night to make sure all the best new movie trailers are here for you the moment they're released. In addition to being the #1 Movie Trailers Channel on YouTube, we deliver amazing and engaging original videos each week. Watch our exclusive Ultimate Trailers, Showdowns, Instant Trailer Reviews, Monthly MashUps, Movie News, and so much more to keep you in the know. Here at Fandango MOVIECLIPS, we love movies as much as you!
Views: 14950132 Movieclips Trailers
International English
 
20:38
International English is the concept of the English language as a global means of communication in numerous dialects, and also the movement towards an international standard for the language. It is also referred to as Global English, World English, Common English, Continental English, General English, Engas, or Globish. Sometimes, these terms refer simply to the array of varieties of English spoken throughout the world. Sometimes, "international English" and the related terms above refer to a desired standardisation, i.e. Standard English; however, there is no consensus on the path to this goal. There have been many proposals for making International English more accessible to people from different nationalities. Basic English is an example, but it failed to make progress. More recently, there have been proposals for English as a lingua franca. It has also been argued that International English is held back by its traditional spelling. There has been slow progress in adopting alternate spellings. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 579 Audiopedia
Australia Group- Academic Summary Jocular Mockery
 
05:29
In the article Mock impoliteness, jocular mockery and jocular abuse in Australian and British English (Haugh & Bousfield, 2012), the authors begin by establishing some definitions. While on the surface, social interactions can be understood as either polite, impolite, or neutral, they can be pragmatically understood on a spectrum. This spectrum includes mock impoliteness, non-politeness, jocular mockery, and jocular abuse, as well as understandings that are completely consistent with their surface meanings. Mock impoliteness can be defined as “the exploitation of jocular/humorous insults or ‘banter’ to display or create solidarity and refer to instances where a speaker says something which is obviously ‘‘untrue’’ and ‘‘impolite’’ in order to convey by implicature something which is true” (Leech, 1983). In other words, mock impoliteness has the curious ability of hurting the esteem of a group member, while somehow improving group unity and the member’s status within the community. This is not to be confuse with ironic politeness, as the “mock” impoliteness is a still a force that can cause discomfort for the subject and imply that he is “taking himself too seriously”, a grievous social more in Australia and Northwest England. Jocular mockery and jocular abuse are both subcategories of mock impoliteness. Jocular mockery involves insulting an activity or action of a group member, while jocular abuse involves directly attacking an individual’s character. This article includes several examples of both jocular abuse and jocular mockery. In one example reenacted in the video, two Australian housemates are talking about a recent experience one of them had with a flirtatious bartender. The storyteller explains how the bartender was flirting instead of working hard. He adds unnecessary emphasis by claiming it’s “poor work ethic”. His friend then says that he should “threaten his life”. This is impolite, as it implies that the narrator is a murderous person without morals. However, both understand that he would never kill someone, and they laugh it off as jocular mockery. This has strengthened their relationship and reminded the storyteller that he needs to “not take himself too seriously”. While the subjects were different between the two cultures did differ, the overall goal of non-impoliteness was the same. It reinforced the relationship, and it caused a slight amount of pain for the person being “mocked”, bringing him back into line with acceptable social standards. The paper mentioned that this occurs in the United States as well, and indeed, we as a group could think of several different instances in which we’ve seen this non-impoliteness in our own lives. We therefore agree with this paper in its broad claim, that jocular mockery is an important and widespread part of Anglocentric culture. It’s not uncommon for Americans to joke and tease each other in such a way that maintains the social order. However, the paper had a masculine focus. While this does seem to be a more common phenomenon in men, it would hardly be a waste of time to collect data from women as well. Our culture is currently undergoing a major redefinition of gender and what it means to be “masculine” or “feminine”. It’s possible that non-impoliteness may be a primarily masculine thing, but that it’s diffusing into popular use among both genders. It could say a lot about how American culture is currently changing. It’s also interesting that the paper focused on Australia and Northwest England. As we’ve already mentioned, it seems like this phenomenon is much more widespread than the paper’s scope. It would be an interesting analysis to expand the focus to include other inner circle Englishes. In fact, it would be very interesting to research whether or not non-impoliteness is also present in outer and expanding circle Englishes, perhaps including some analyses of whether use goes up or down between English and the native language. What we might be observing here may actually be common to all speakers of English worldwide, and could provide some interesting discoveries in the diffusion of English pragmatics along with the language. References Goddard, C. (2006). Ethnopragmatics : Understanding Discourse in Cultural Context. Berlin: De Gruyter. Griffith PhD candidate studies the art of offending well. (2015, September 18). Retrieved from OzTrekk: http://www.oztrekk.com/blog/tag/jocular-mockery/ Haugh, M., & Bousfield, D. (2012). Mock impoliteness, jocular mockery and jocular abuse in Australian and British English. Journal of Pragmatics, 44(9), 1099-1114. Leech, G. N. (1983). Principles of pragmatics. London, England: Longman.
Views: 125 LING 3220 Australia
Inventing Freedom: English Speaking Countries
 
07:04
Daniel Hannum, a Conservative Member of the European Parliament, warned America 5years ago not to adopt Obamacare or we would destroy our health care like the U.K. Now, his predictions are coming true but he claims that as free citizens we can reclaim our culture that is slipping away. Those English speaking countries like Singapore, Hong Kong and Bermuda are not China, Indinesia, and Haiti.
Views: 180 borisgaydos
Claude Hagège at MIT, 2001 - English as Global Language: Real or Imagined Threat?
 
01:45:48
Professor Claude Hagège, French linguist and renowned polyglot, presents the second of two lectures at MIT, sponsored by the Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures and the Center for Bilingual/Bicultural Studies at MIT. In his talk titled “English as Global Language: Real or Imagined Threat?”, Hagège reviews the processes in recent history by which English has taken hold as a major international language, and considers its localized evolutions and influences along the way. Prof. Hagège holds the Chair of Linguistic Theory at the Collège de France and is the director at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes. He was elected to the Collège de France in 1988 and received several awards for his work, including the Prix de l'Académie Française and the CNRS Gold Medal. Please Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/c/MITVideoProductions?sub_confirmation=1
Literacy and Technology: Where We've Been and Where We're Heading
 
01:13:49
Richard Kern is Associate Professor of French and Director of the Berkeley Language Center. In addition to teaching in the language program, Professor Kern also teaches courses in applied linguistics and foreign language pedagogy. His research interests include second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, reading, writing, and linkages between technology and literacy.
Views: 2325 COERLL
Mod-01 Lec-07 The Rise of Cultural Studies
 
53:53
English Language and Literature by Dr. Liza Das & Dr. Krishna Barua,Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,IIT Guwahati.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 1344 nptelhrd
Canagarajah's AAAL Lecture for Distinguished Scholarship
 
01:03:00
Lecture for the Distinguished Scholarship and Service Award of the American Association of Applied Linguistics, March 26, 2018, Chicago. Abstract: "Another Fucking Cancer Diary." Those were the words of British novelist Jenny Diski when she received her cancer diagnosis. The profusion of disability narratives filled her with an "anxiety of influence." This evolving genre has critiqued the ideology of ableism dominant in social and academic discourses. It conveys that all of us are anomalous, and that our capacity to act goes beyond cognitive or individual agency. It has drawn attention to the epistemological value of the body, generative role of social and material networks, and the place of ethics in interactions. In applied linguistics, there is a readiness to acknowledge that one can never be competent or self-reliant for communication in contemporary contexts of unpredictability and diversity. Disability studies helps us redefine language "competence" along embodiment, prosthetic semiotic resources, distributed practice, and ethics. It also informs intersectionality, reframing identity politics towards addressing materiality, relationality, and vulnerability. I illustrate from my ongoing research with international STEM scholars to demonstrate how their communicative success transcends self-acknowledged incompetence in English. I theorize from my personal investment in writing and studying cancer narratives.
Views: 682 Suresh Canagarajah
Outline of globalization | Wikipedia audio article
 
17:45
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_globalization 00:00:48 1 Global studies 00:01:42 2 History 00:02:39 3 Globalization concepts 00:02:55 3.1 Globalization-related theories 00:03:29 3.2 Globalization-related indices 00:04:01 4 Aspects of globalization 00:04:12 4.1 Global business organization 00:05:07 4.2 Economic globalization 00:06:23 4.3 Sociocultural globalization 00:09:10 4.4 Workforce globalization 00:10:43 4.5 Global natural environment 00:12:35 5 Globalization issues 00:14:00 6 By location 00:14:30 7 Categories about globalization-related organizations 00:15:19 8 Globalization-related lists 00:16:45 9 Works about globalization 00:17:16 10 Persons influential in globalization Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7842392028115586 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the broad, interdisciplinary subject of globalization: Globalization (or globalisation) – processes of international integration arising from the interchange of world views, products, ideas, and other aspects of culture. Advances in transportation and telecommunications infrastructure, including the rise of the Internet, are major factors in globalization, generating further interdependence of economic and cultural activities. Globalizing processes affect and are affected by business and work organization, economics, socio-cultural resources, and the natural environment.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Literacy Crisis, Then and Now /  Part1
 
30:17
Literacy Crises, Then and Now: The Multimodal, Multilingual Past, Present, and Future of English Studies Working to historicize contemporary conversations about multimodality and globalization in English studies, Palmeri revisits past moments in the field (such as the turn of the 70s) when English scholars and teachers confronted profound shifts in communication technologies and college student demographics. On the one hand, a look back at previous "literacy crises" can remind us to be wary of how hyperbolic narratives of technological and cultural change can be employed to reinforce oppressive power structures and to sediment narrowly alphabetic and Eurocentric epistemologies. On the other hand, a look back at past times of "crisis" can also uncover transformative moments of possibility—moments when English scholars and teachers embraced and began to enact a radically multimodal, multilingual vision of the field. By reclaiming and remixing our field's past engagements with multimodal and linguistic diversity, Palmeri ultimately seeks to outline a capacious, activist vision for the Department of Englishes in the twenty-first century. Jason Palmeri is Assistant Professor of English and affiliate faculty in Interactive Media Studies at Miami University, where he also serves as the Director of the Composition Program and Co-Coordinator of Digital Writing Collaborative. Palmeri is author of Remixing Composition: A History of Multimodal Writing Pedagogy (SIUP 2012) as well as numerous articles on digital pedagogy in journals such as Computers and Composition and Technical Communication Quarterly.
Views: 107 Entisar E
Literacy Crisis, Then and Now Part2
 
25:08
Literacy Crises, Then and Now: The Multimodal, Multilingual Past, Present, and Future of English Studies Working to historicize contemporary conversations about multimodality and globalization in English studies, Palmeri revisits past moments in the field (such as the turn of the 70s) when English scholars and teachers confronted profound shifts in communication technologies and college student demographics. On the one hand, a look back at previous "literacy crises" can remind us to be wary of how hyperbolic narratives of technological and cultural change can be employed to reinforce oppressive power structures and to sediment narrowly alphabetic and Eurocentric epistemologies. On the other hand, a look back at past times of "crisis" can also uncover transformative moments of possibility—moments when English scholars and teachers embraced and began to enact a radically multimodal, multilingual vision of the field. By reclaiming and remixing our field's past engagements with multimodal and linguistic diversity, Palmeri ultimately seeks to outline a capacious, activist vision for the Department of Englishes in the twenty-first century. Jason Palmeri is Assistant Professor of English and affiliate faculty in Interactive Media Studies at Miami University, where he also serves as the Director of the Composition Program and Co-Coordinator of Digital Writing Collaborative. Palmeri is author of Remixing Composition: A History of Multimodal Writing Pedagogy (SIUP 2012) as well as numerous articles on digital pedagogy in journals such as Computers and Composition and Technical Communication Quarterly.
Views: 63 Entisar E
Oxford English Dictionary | Wikipedia audio article
 
47:55
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oxford English Dictionary Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world. The second edition, comprising 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, was published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was only in 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society. In 1895, the title The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) was first used unofficially on the covers of the series, and in 1928 the full dictionary was republished in ten bound volumes. In 1933, the title The Oxford English Dictionary fully replaced the former name in all occurrences in its reprinting as twelve volumes with a one-volume supplement. More supplements came over the years until 1989, when the second edition was published. Since 2000, compilation of a third edition of the dictionary has been underway, approximately half of which is complete.The first electronic version of the dictionary was made available in 1988. The online version has been available since 2000, and as of April 2014 was receiving over two million hits per month. The third edition of the dictionary will most likely only appear in electronic form: the Chief Executive of Oxford University Press has stated that it is unlikely that it will ever be printed.
Views: 40 wikipedia tts
English orthography | Wikipedia audio article
 
36:59
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: English orthography 00:01:19 1 Function of the letters 00:01:46 1.1 Phonemic representation 00:03:26 1.2 Word origin 00:04:32 1.3 Homophone differentiation 00:05:49 1.4 Marking sound changes in other letters 00:07:15 1.5 Multiple functionality 00:07:18 1.6 Underlying representation 00:07:28 2 Diacritics 00:07:47 3 Ligatures 00:12:40 4 Phonic irregularities 00:15:37 5 Spelling irregularities 00:16:21 5.1 History 00:17:54 5.2 "Ough" words 00:23:33 6 Spelling patterns 00:27:56 6.1 Spelling-to-sound correspondences 00:29:31 6.1.1 Vowels 00:29:40 6.1.2 Combinations of vowel letters 00:29:50 6.1.3 Consonants 00:32:09 6.1.4 Combinations of vowel letters and "r" 00:33:08 6.1.5 Combinations of other consonant and vowel letters 00:34:18 6.2 Sound-to-spelling correspondences 00:34:28 6.2.1 Consonants 00:34:53 6.2.2 Vowels 00:35:27 7 See also 00:36:13 7.1 Orthographies of English-related languages 00:36:31 8 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= English orthography is the system of writing conventions used to represent spoken English in written form that allows readers to connect spelling to sound to meaning.Like the orthography of most world languages, English orthography has a broad degree of standardization. However, unlike with most languages, there are multiple ways to spell nearly every phoneme (sound), and most letters also have multiple pronunciations depending on their position in a word and the context. Several orthographic mistakes are common even among native speakers. This is mainly due to the large number of words that have been borrowed from a large number of other languages throughout the history of the English language, without successful attempts at complete spelling reforms. Most of the spelling conventions in Modern English were derived from the phonetic spelling of a variety of Middle English, and generally do not reflect the sound changes that have occurred since the late 15th century (such as the Great Vowel Shift).Despite the various English dialects spoken from country to country and within different regions of the same country, there are only slight regional variations in English orthography, the two most recognized variations being British and American spelling, and its overall uniformity helps facilitate international communication. On the other hand, it also adds to the discrepancy between the way English is written and spoken in any given location.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts
Philippine English | Wikipedia audio article
 
13:55
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Philippine English Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog). Code-switching is prevalent in informal situations.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Dr Michael Walrod
 
50:34
Mike Walrod has authored two books on discourse analysis, as well as other articles and magazine columns on linguistics, translation, and cross-cultural work. He served as Associate Director for Academic Affairs of SIL Philippines, on the Board of Directors of Wycliffe Bible Translators of Canada and of Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (GIAL), and as Chair of the linguistics department at TWU. Mike was founder and President of the Canada Institute of Linguistics until May 2014. Mike and Verna did translation work for two decades in the Ga'dang language, Philippines.
Views: 53 NOBTS Events
Greater India | Wikipedia audio article
 
57:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Greater India Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The term Greater India is most commonly used to encompass the historical and geographic extent of all political entities of the Indian subcontinent, and the regions which are culturally linked to India or received significant Indian cultural influence. These countries have to varying degrees been transformed by the acceptance and induction of cultural and institutional elements of India. Since around 500 BCE, Asia's expanding land and maritime trade had resulted in prolonged socio-economic and cultural stimulation and diffusion of Hindu and Buddhist beliefs into the region's cosmology, in particular in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka. In Central Asia, transmission of ideas were predominantly of a religious nature.By the early centuries of the common era most of the principalities of Southeast Asia had effectively absorbed defining aspects of Hindu culture, religion and administration. The notion of divine god-kingship was introduced by the concept of Harihara, Sanskrit and other Indian epigraphic systems were declared official, like those of the south Indian Pallava dynasty and Chalukya dynasty. These Indianized Kingdoms, a term coined by George Cœdès in his work Histoire ancienne des états hindouisés d'Extrême-Orient, were characterized by surprising resilience, political integrity and administrative stability.To the north, Indian religious ideas were accepted into the cosmology of Himalayan peoples, most profoundly in Tibet and Bhutan. Buddhist monasticism extended into Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and other parts of Central Asia, and Buddhist texts and ideas were readily accepted in China and Japan in the east. To the west, Indian culture converged with Greater Persia via the Hindukush and the Pamir Mountains.
Views: 156 wikipedia tts
Oxford English Dictionary | Wikipedia audio article
 
47:55
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oxford English Dictionary Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world. The second edition, comprising 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, was published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was only in 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society. In 1895, the title The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) was first used unofficially on the covers of the series, and in 1928 the full dictionary was republished in ten bound volumes. In 1933, the title The Oxford English Dictionary fully replaced the former name in all occurrences in its reprinting as twelve volumes with a one-volume supplement. More supplements came over the years until 1989, when the second edition was published. Since 2000, compilation of a third edition of the dictionary has been underway, approximately half of which is complete.The first electronic version of the dictionary was made available in 1988. The online version has been available since 2000, and as of April 2014 was receiving over two million hits per month. The third edition of the dictionary will most likely only appear in electronic form: the Chief Executive of Oxford University Press has stated that it is unlikely that it will ever be printed.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Indianized kingdom | Wikipedia audio article
 
57:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Indianized kingdom Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The term Greater India is most commonly used to encompass the historical and geographic extent of all political entities of the Indian subcontinent, and the regions which are culturally linked to India or received significant Indian cultural influence. These countries have to varying degrees been transformed by the acceptance and induction of cultural and institutional elements of India. Since around 500 BCE, Asia's expanding land and maritime trade had resulted in prolonged socio-economic and cultural stimulation and diffusion of Hindu and Buddhist beliefs into the region's cosmology, in particular in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka. In Central Asia, transmission of ideas were predominantly of a religious nature.By the early centuries of the common era most of the principalities of Southeast Asia had effectively absorbed defining aspects of Hindu culture, religion and administration. The notion of divine god-kingship was introduced by the concept of Harihara, Sanskrit and other Indian epigraphic systems were declared official, like those of the south Indian Pallava dynasty and Chalukya dynasty. These Indianized Kingdoms, a term coined by George Cœdès in his work Histoire ancienne des états hindouisés d'Extrême-Orient, were characterized by surprising resilience, political integrity and administrative stability.To the north, Indian religious ideas were accepted into the cosmology of Himalayan peoples, most profoundly in Tibet and Bhutan. Buddhist monasticism extended into Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and other parts of Central Asia, and Buddhist texts and ideas were readily accepted in China and Japan in the east. To the west, Indian culture converged with Greater Persia via the Hindukush and the Pamir Mountains.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
Denise Cruz on Global Fashion and Filipino Nationalism in the Postwar Moment
 
42:10
From the 1940s to the 1960s, the modern runway show emerged in Manila alongside developments in postwar Filipino nationalism, as the Philippines, newly independent from the United States and Japan, sought to articulate its relationships to Asia and the United States. Given that the label "made in the Philippines" has long been synonymous with inexpensive, outsourced labor, what did—and does—it mean to view couture as centered not in the global North, but from the vantage of the global South? How can Filipino couture—as art form, product, and performance—reconfigure the gendered categories that have shaped our understanding of postcolonialism and global exchange? Denise Cruz addresses these topics and questions. Denise Cruz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. March 9, 2016 Brown University Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) For more information: https://www.brown.edu/academics/race-ethnicity/events/2016/03/denise-cruz-university-toronto-runway-global-fashion-and-filipino-nationalism-postwar
Views: 745 Brown University
New Orleans | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:39:24
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: New Orleans Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= New Orleans (, locally ; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] (listen)) is a consolidated city-parish located along the Mississippi River in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Louisiana. With an estimated population of 393,292 in 2017, it is the most populous city in Louisiana. A major port, New Orleans is considered an economic and commercial hub for the broader Gulf Coast region of the United States. New Orleans is world-renowned for its distinct music, Creole cuisine, unique dialect, and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The historic heart of the city is the French Quarter, known for its French and Spanish Creole architecture and vibrant nightlife along Bourbon Street. The city has been described as the "most unique" in the United States, owing in large part to its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. Founded in 1718 by French colonists, New Orleans was once the territorial capital of French Louisiana before being traded to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. New Orleans was once the third-most populous city in the United States, and it was the largest city in the American South from the Antebellum era until after World War II. The city's location and low elevation have historically made it very vulnerable to flooding, leading to the installation of a complex system of levees and drainage pumps.New Orleans was severely affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, flooding over 80% of the city and causing a population decline of over 50%. Since Katrina, major redevelopment efforts have led to a rebound in the city's population. Although, concerns about gentrification, new residents buying property in closely knit communities, and displacement of longtime residents have been voiced .The city and Orleans Parish (French: paroisse d'Orléans) are coterminous. As of 2017, Orleans Parish is the third most-populous parish in Louisiana, behind East Baton Rouge Parish and neighboring Jefferson Parish. The city and parish are bounded by St. Tammany Parish and Lake Pontchartrain to the north, St. Bernard Parish and Lake Borgne to the east, Plaquemines Parish to the south, and Jefferson Parish to the south and west. The city anchors the larger New Orleans metropolitan area which had an estimated population of 1,275,762 in 2017, making it the most populous metropolitan area in Louisiana and the 46th-most populated in the United States.
Views: 61 wikipedia tts
Re-Creating Narrative Therapy Elsewhere
 
17:17
Jehanzeb Baldiwala, David Epston, André Grégoire, Sumie Ishikawa and marcela polanco talk together with the help of video conferencing about their experiences re-creating narrative therapy in different contexts. Filmed at Narrative Educators Camp, Charlotte, Vermont, June 2017. (English subtitles available)
New Orleans | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:39:24
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: New Orleans Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= New Orleans (, locally ; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] (listen)) is a consolidated city-parish located along the Mississippi River in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Louisiana. With an estimated population of 393,292 in 2017, it is the most populous city in Louisiana. A major port, New Orleans is considered an economic and commercial hub for the broader Gulf Coast region of the United States. New Orleans is world-renowned for its distinct music, Creole cuisine, unique dialect, and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The historic heart of the city is the French Quarter, known for its French and Spanish Creole architecture and vibrant nightlife along Bourbon Street. The city has been described as the "most unique" in the United States, owing in large part to its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. Founded in 1718 by French colonists, New Orleans was once the territorial capital of French Louisiana before being traded to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. New Orleans was once the third-most populous city in the United States, and it was the largest city in the American South from the Antebellum era until after World War II. The city's location and low elevation have historically made it very vulnerable to flooding, leading to the installation of a complex system of levees and drainage pumps.New Orleans was severely affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, flooding over 80% of the city and causing a population decline of over 50%. Since Katrina, major redevelopment efforts have led to a rebound in the city's population. Although, concerns about gentrification, new residents buying property in closely knit communities, and displacement of longtime residents have been voiced .The city and Orleans Parish (French: paroisse d'Orléans) are coterminous. As of 2017, Orleans Parish is the third most-populous parish in Louisiana, behind East Baton Rouge Parish and neighboring Jefferson Parish. The city and parish are bounded by St. Tammany Parish and Lake Pontchartrain to the north, St. Bernard Parish and Lake Borgne to the east, Plaquemines Parish to the south, and Jefferson Parish to the south and west. The city anchors the larger New Orleans metropolitan area which had an estimated population of 1,275,762 in 2017, making it the most populous metropolitan area in Louisiana and the 46th-most populated in the United States.
Views: 31 wikipedia tts
Standardization
 
19:21
Standardization or standardisation is the process of developing and implementing technical standards. Standardization can help to maximize compatibility, interoperability, safety, repeatability, or quality. It can also facilitate commoditization of formerly custom processes. In social sciences, including economics, the idea of standardization is close to the solution for a coordination problem, a situation in which all parties can realize mutual gains, but only by making mutually consistent decisions. Standardization is defined as best technical application consentual wisdom inclusive of processes for selection in making appropriate choices for ratification coupled with consistent decisions for maintaining obtained standards. This view includes the case of "spontaneous standardization processes", to produce de facto standards. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 940 Audiopedia
Expression écrite - 300 mots - Le rappel de cours - ANGLAIS - Terminale - Les Bons Profs
 
03:31
Une vidéo d'Anglais pour maîtriser la méthode des sujets d'expression écrite en 300 mots. Plus de vidéos d'Anglais sur http://www.lesbonsprofs.com/terminale#!anglais/comprehension-ecrite
Views: 176809 Les Bons Profs
Tonal language | Wikipedia audio article
 
52:01
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Tonal language Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Tone is the use of pitch in language to distinguish lexical or grammatical meaning – that is, to distinguish or to inflect words. All verbal languages use pitch to express emotional and other paralinguistic information and to convey emphasis, contrast, and other such features in what is called intonation, but not all languages use tones to distinguish words or their inflections, analogously to consonants and vowels. Languages that do have this feature are called tonal languages; the distinctive tone patterns of such a language are sometimes called tonemes, by analogy with phoneme. Tonal languages are common in East and Southeast Asia, the Pacific, Africa, and the Americas; as many as seventy percent of world languages may be tonal.In many tonal African languages, such as most Bantu languages, tones are distinguished by their pitch level relative to each other, known as a register tone system. In multisyllable words, a single tone may be carried by the entire word rather than a different tone on each syllable. Often, grammatical information, such as past versus present, "I" versus "you", or positive versus negative, is conveyed solely by tone. In the most widely spoken tonal language, Mandarin Chinese, tones are distinguished by their distinctive shape, known as contour, with each tone having a different internal pattern of rising and falling pitch. Many words, especially monosyllabic ones, are differentiated solely by tone. In a multisyllabic word, each syllable often carries its own tone. Unlike in Bantu systems, tone plays little role in the grammar of modern standard Chinese, though the tones descend from features in Old Chinese that had morphological significance (such as changing a verb to a noun or vice versa). Contour systems are typical of languages of the Mainland Southeast Asia linguistic area, including Kra–Dai, Vietic and Sino-Tibetan languages. The Afroasiatic, Khoisan, Niger-Congo and Nilo-Saharan languages spoken in Africa are dominated by register systems. Some languages combine both systems, such as Cantonese, which produces three varieties of contour tone at three different pitch levels, and the Omotic (Afroasiatic) language Bench, which employs five level tones and one or two rising tones across levels.Many languages use tone in a more limited way. In Japanese, fewer than half of the words have a drop in pitch; words contrast according to which syllable this drop follows. Such minimal systems are sometimes called pitch accent since they are reminiscent of stress accent languages, which typically allow one principal stressed syllable per word. However, there is debate over the definition of pitch accent and whether a coherent definition is even possible.
Views: 29 wikipedia tts
4-10 Engaging International Students through CLAC
 
49:55
CAS Event Tuesday, April 10, 2018; 5 p.m. HUMN 1B80, CU Boulder The increase in international student enrollments on U.S. campuses during the last decade challenges faculty, staff and administrators to think about strategies for developing welcoming environments for this diverse population. A logical place to begin thinking about international student well-being and academic success is to consider ways faculty can leverage students' language and cultural knowledge to support their academic goals and increase a sense of belonging and contribution in the classroom. After a brief overview of CLAC's philosophical approach to learning, Gonzalez will provide an in-depth case study of international students' experiences in Binghamton University's CLAC program, which she directed for more than 15 years. Currently she is chair of the CLAC Consortium, and also Director of the University of Rochester ONCAMPUS Center.
Views: 12 CUBoulderCAS
Mauritian Writer Shenaz Patel
 
01:14:11
Shenaz Patel read selections of her work and participated in a discussion with Library staff. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7775
Views: 353 LibraryOfCongress
Philippine English | Wikipedia audio article
 
14:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Philippine English Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog). Code-switching is prevalent in informal situations.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts