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Debt Crisis of United States of America 2018 Explained in a Simplified Way
 
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Debt Crisis in United States of America, A Simplified way of understanding the whole scenario of the debt crisis, the inevitable collapse of the american Economy. A must watch simple explanation video for understanding the scenario of US Economy, inflation, stagflation, recession etc. for all those who are considering to shift their jobs and businesses to US in coming future, Sorry for the outdated data figures in the video but it will give you a straight and simple idea about the thing. Debt Crisis: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debt_crisis US Debt Crisis 2013: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_debt-ceiling_crisis_of_2013 US debt crisis 2011: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_debt-ceiling_crisis_of_2011 Stagflation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stagflation Some Featured Thoughts by viewers: David Hung: In order not to pay their debt , The evil U.S government will start wars all over the wold , like they always do in the past , in north Africa , Mid-East , South America & wish to overthrow their biggest creditor China . When U.S government use their borrow-money to build army , weapons & missile to kill human life , they even say they believe in God ,how would God answer this BS ! The most bad thing in the world is that you borrow money and you do not pay back , so you kill the person you borrow money from. Cassio VA : Solutions: 1- Make the bigs companies pay taxes 2- Stop burning money whit military things 3- Turn Communism Emperor Tikacuti : The preparation will be, WWIII and the collapse of the American imperial economy, because the American Empire owes more than 20 trillion dollars, both to the nations of the world and the government. If they continue to borrow money from other nations, other nations will feel threatened and will rise as anti-Americans, because they don't want their money to be stolen and borrowing money from the bank will lead to serious problems, for internal debt, whether banking, IRS, companies, insurances and even health care and whatever they're doing against nations and itself and citizens refuse to pay but spend on materials and products, the fault will not be the government but the people as well, because the American Empire isn't ruled by the government but by the people, who caused the collapse and starting a war against nations for resource like Nazi Germany. WWIII will lead the collapse of the American Empire and Capitalism, ending the Cold War and other problems and that time will come, when the bomb hits. Goler Soft 7: how does the government pay back the us debt by putting the fed printed money in banks all around america? and plus the fed charges interest witch puts the government in more debt. so basicly dats paying debt wit debt. also, how does paying back the debt with the federal reserve money cause inflation when the governments not putting the loaned fed money in the economy just using it on the debt? or mabey the government isnt using it to pay the debt. mabye there just putting it in the ecconomy causing inflation claiming there paying off the debt, but really causing inflation. but why? kalatapie: there are two easy steps in fixing the debt crisis: step 1: increce the taxes on the wealthy people. why? because it is not normal for a man to make more money a day than an american makes a lifetime! stem 2: reduce military spending. because, seriously, the cold war is over. you do not need to spend 20% of your GDP in the military considering that there is no major threat for your country. Demogorgon47 : And when the global financial collapse happens revolution will most likely begin. Millions will die from lack of resources and warfare. People will be calling for the heads of the douchebags that enacted the ridiculous federal reserves that corrupted the whole fucking system to begin with. Reserve banks are the cancer in the system. Loaning the people the nation's currency at interest in a huge fucking mistake. A robbery of the worst kind and it'll bring the whole system crashing down because a few greedy fucks decided to rob EVERYONE world wide. It's a broken system. Either replace it with a resource based economy or hold the greedy fucks accountable. Oh that's right they've got everyone in their pocket so they're untouchable. Fucking bullshit. Why is it no one listens to voice of reason? If people did so maybe we wouldn't be heading towards extinction by greed! My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/AkashVedi.Page My Twitter Page: http://twitter.com/AkashVedi Video : Tequs http://tequs.com Like, Comment and Subscribe to the channel for more interactive updates.
Views: 1835452 Akash Vedi
The Industrial Economy: Crash Course US History #23
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Industrial Economy that arose in the United States after the Civil War. You know how when you're studying history, and you're reading along and everything seems safely in the past, and then BOOM you think, "Man, this suddenly seems very modern." For me, that moment in US History is the post-Reconstruction expansion of industrialism in America. After the Civil War, many of the changes in technology and ideas gave rise to this new industrialism. You'll learn about the rise of Captains of Industry (or Robber Barons) like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, John D Rockefeller, and JP Morgan. You'll learn about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices. All this, plus John will cover how workers reacted to the changes in society and the early days of the labor movement. You'll learn about the Knights of Labor and Terence Powderly, and Samuel Gompers and the AFL. As a special bonus, someone gets beaten with a cane. AGAIN. What is it with American History and people getting beaten with canes? Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 1892513 CrashCourse
Resources: Welcome to the Neighborhood - Crash Course Kids #2.1
 
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Welcome to the Neighborhood! Humans need a lot of things to survive (I'm sure you've noticed). We need food, water, and shelter and it takes a lot of resources to get all of those things. What are resources? In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina talks about what resources are and how we use them. And you might be surprised where all of it starts. This first series is based on 5th grade science. We're super excited and hope you enjoy Crash Course Kids! ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/CrashCourseKids Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Producer: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Ben Kessler Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 232509 Crash Course Kids
WW2: The Resource War - Arsenal of Democracy - Extra History - #1
 
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*Sponsored* Hearts of Iron IV comes out on June 6! Check out the game: http://pdxint.at/hoi4_coming_soon To understand nations at war, you have to look at how their economies function. With World War II on the horizon, Europe and Asia dug themselves in for a fight - and a look at each other's resources told them what to expect. --- (Episode details below) Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Watch the WW2: Resource War series! http://bit.ly/1PRaI22 Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ Why doesn't this series use the Nazi swastika symbol? James explains: http://bit.ly/1Pzy1k5 ____________ European economies were so closely connected that some people expected they have to avoid another world war or destroy their finances, but in fact World War I had taught them how to prepare for just such a scenario. Germany, France, and Great Britain all invested in their military before war broke out. When evaluating these economies to see how war would affect them, we look at four main factors: GDP, population, territorial extent, and per capita income. Broadly, this helps us determine how resilient, expansive, self-sufficient, and developed a nation is. All of those factors determine how a nation must conduct its war. For example, the vast territorial holdings of the British Empire meant that they had vast resources to draw upon but needed a long time to mobilize them, which helped Germany determine that they needed to strike fast and win big if they hoped to win the war before Britain's full resources came into play. Japan also estimated that they could win a war in the Pacific if they managed to win before the US had been involved for more than 6 months. These calculations drove the early strategies of the Axis powers, but the participation of the US would later prove to be a crucial factor. ____________ BONUS! Economies of Japan and China before WWII: GDP (Bn USD-1990) Japan - 169.4 Japanese Colonies - 62.9 China (exc. Manchuria): 320.5 POPULATION (mil) Japan - 71.9 Japanese Colonies: 59.8 China (exc. Manchuria): 411.7 TERRITORY (thous sq.km) Japan - 382 Japanese Colonies - 1602 China (exc. Manchuria): 9800 AVG ANNUAL WAGE (USD-1990) Japan - 2,356 Japanese Colonies - 1,052 China (exc. Manchuria) - 778 From: “The Economics of World War II: Six Great Powers in International Comparison” by Mark Harrison Buy the book! http://amzn.to/1oxvdKQ ____________ ♫ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♫ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1733870 Extra Credits
Global Economy Expected to Grow 3% in 2019 Despite Risks - World Economic Situation and Prospects
 
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Speakers: Mr. Elliott Harris, UN Chief Economist and Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development and Dawn Holland, Chief, Global Economic Monitoring Branch, Economic Analysis and Policy Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (EPAD/DESA). The World Economic Situation and Prospects (WESP) report is a joint product of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN/DESA), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the five United Nations regional commissions (Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA)). WESP Report website: https://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/document_gem/global-economic-monitoring-unit/world-economic-situation-and-prospects-wesp-report/ UN Chief Economist Elliott Harris said while global economic growth remained on a fairly steady trajectory in 2019, “the world economy is faced with a confluence of rising risks with the potential to severely disrupt economic activity and inflict significant damage on longer term development prospects.” Harris spoke to reporters in New York today (21 Jan) on the findings of the UN’s annual World Economic Situation and Prospects report (WESP). The report projected that economic activity was expected to expand at a steady pace of three percent and found that unemployment rates had dropped to historic lows in many countries. However, Harris said a closer look beneath the surface reveals significant issues with the foundations and quality of global economic growth. He said growth is “uneven, and it is often failing to reach the countries and the groups where it is most needed” with per capita incomes expected to “stagnate or grow only marginally in 2019 in several parts of Africa, Western Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.” He said international trading tensions escalated, particularly between the United States and China, while public and private debt has risen to historic highs. The Chief Economist said while adverse effects have been largely contained, these factors cast a shadow over the economic outlook for 2019 and beyond. Elliott Harris, UN Chief Economist and Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development: “In the case of a downturn in global economic activity, policy makers around the world will struggle to react forcefully because monetary and fiscal space in many countries is now much more limited than it was at the outbreak of the global financial and economic crisis a decade ago. And, given the waning support for multilateral approaches, coordinated action in response to the shock, or any shock, similar to the response to the global financial crisis may be more difficult to achieve.” Harris said long-term challenges such as climate change “have now become increasingly short-term risks.” He added, “In recent years, we have seen an increasing number of extreme weather events that have had a particularly damaging effect on vulnerable countries, including many Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States; building resilience by supporting the most vulnerable countries to invest in climate- resilient infrastructure, is as important as rebuilding after a disaster.” The Chief Economist underscored that the “essential transition” towards sustainable consumption and production patterns globally was “simply not happening fast enough.” He said economies remained far too dependent on carbon, energy, and the use of resources and stressed the need to “to delink economic growth from environmental degradation and this means shifting our resources away from investments in the old brown technologies towards investments in new, more resource-efficient and low-carbon technologies.” Harris emphasized that global problems could only be confronted through collective action, adding that a withdrawal from multilateralism would further set back those who are already being left behind. He said, “Some countries are doing reasonably well, but other are not. By the same token, income levels are varying across the world. Inequality has risen within countries. And what we see happening is more and more people are registering dissatisfaction with the outcomes of our global system, without having their policy makers explain to them what actually is going on. And so that frustration then makes for a growing readiness to, let’s say, be receptive, if you will, to nationalist arguments saying ‘let’s do what is best for us individually, as a country, as a nation’; rather than the support for the multilateral approach that we have seen over the past 40 years. And we think that that is a real problem, because it does undermine the ability of the world to deal with some of our global problems in a collective manner.”
Views: 376 United Nations
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 490786 CrashCourse
Intro to Economics: Crash Course Econ #1
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill launch a brand new Crash Course on Economics! So, what is economics? Good question. It's not necessarily about money, or stock markets, or trade. It's about people and choices. What, you may ask, does that mean. We'll show you. Let's get started! Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: My Students FROM: Mrs. Culp Culpzilla's students are amazing! You guys rock! TO: Everyone FROM: Pankaj DFTBA and keep being the exception like the Mongols. Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Summer Naugle, Minnow, Ilkka Hemmilä, Kaitlyn Celeste, Lee Toran, Sarty, Damian Shaw, Nathaniel "The Skipper" Cruz Chavez, Maura Doyle, Chris, Sander Mutsaers Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 3441274 CrashCourse
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 293920 CrashCourse
A History of Money and Banking in the United States (Part 1, 1/4) by Murray N. Rothbard
 
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"The History of Money and Banking Before the Twentieth Century" from Part 1 of Murray N. Rothbard's book, 'A History of Money and Banking in the United States: The Colonial Era to World War II.' Audio book produced by the Ludwig von Mises Institute and read by Matthew Mezinskis. http://mises.org The master teacher of American economic history covers money and banking in the whole of American history, to show that the meltdown of our times is hardly the first. And guess what caused them in the past? Paper money, loose credit, reckless lending standards, government profligacy, and central banking. Read Murray N. Rothbard's complete book, "A History of Money and Banking in the United States: The Colonial Era to World War II" online: http://mises.org/resources/1022 Audio book playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=6D09BB9900764D5F DISCLAIMER: The Ludwig von Mises Institute has given permission under the Creative Commons license that this audio presentation can be publicly reposted as long as credit is given to the Mises Institute and other guidelines are followed. More info at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute, any of its lecturers or staff members. * * * * * Murray N. Rothbard (1926-1995) was America's greatest radical libertarian author -- writing authoritatively about ethics, philosophy, economics, American history, and the history of ideas. He presented the most fundamental challenge to the legitimacy of government, and he refined thinking about the self-ownership and non-coercion principles. Links to more online books and essays by Murray Rothbard: The Ethics of Liberty http://mises.org/resources/1179 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=250D7BDE36219FA6 For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto http://mises.org/resources/1010 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BD6EC8BF3D7777F3 Man, Economy, and State http://mises.org/resources/1082 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=53CE2A1EA5C720BE The Case Against the Fed http://mises.org/resources/3430 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F1FDA55FD094AAE1 What Has Government Done to Our Money? http://mises.org/resources/617 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=85F528FA4B8DB51D Economic Thought Before Adam Smith: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Volume I http://mises.org/resources/3985 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C60128B8E98929D7 Classical Economics: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Volume II http://mises.org/resources/3986 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=08BADEE86CA3F02F Conceived in Liberty, Volume 1: A New Land, A New People: The American Colonies in the Seventeenth Century http://mises.org/resources/3006 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C50235E756DDE5FD Conceived in Liberty, Volume 2: "Salutary Neglect": The American Colonies in the First Half of the Eighteenth Century http://mises.org/resources/3007 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=B3D31A42E4519B5E Conceived in Liberty, Volume 3: Advance to Revolution, 1760-1775 http://mises.org/resources/3030 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=AA7235FD04C365FE Conceived in Liberty, Volume 4: The Revolutionary War, 1775-1784 http://mises.org/resources/3031 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E8FACD69F94A223A The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar http://mises.org/resources/611 America's Great Depression http://mises.org/resources/694 Panic of 1819: Reactions and Policies http://mises.org/resources/695 Economic Depressions: Their Cause and Cure http://mises.org/resources/2668 Wall Street, Banks, and American Foreign Policy http://mises.org/resources/1223 Ludwig von Mises: Scholar, Creator, Hero http://mises.org/daily/2339 Links to more online books and essays by Murray Rothbard: http://www.lewrockwell.com/rothbard/rothbard-lib.html http://mises.org/daily/author/299 http://mises.org/literature.aspx?action=author&Id=299 Related links: Biography of Murray N. Rothbard (1926-1995) by David Gordon http://mises.org/about/3249 Rothbard's Legacy by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. http://mises.org/daily/4486 Rothbard Vindicated by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. http://www.lewrockwell.com/rockwell/rothbard.html The Unstoppable Rothbard by Jeffrey A. Tucker http://mises.org/article.aspx?Id=1708 Murray N. Rothbard: Mr. Libertarian by Wendy McElroy http://www.lewrockwell.com/mcelroy/mcelroy15.html Human Action: A Treatise on Economics by Ludwig von Mises http://mises.org/resources/3250 Audio book version: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=ED883527337E557B What is Austrian Economics? http://mises.org/etexts/austrian.asp
Views: 49190 LibertyInOurTime
Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6
 
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Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 855128 CrashCourse
Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: Everyone FROM: Martin To gild refined gold is just silly. TO: Dana FROM: Cameron Still holding out. We're going to make it! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Raymond Cason, Marcel Pogorzelski, Cowgirlgem, Chua Chen Wei, Catherine Emond, Victoria Uney, Robin Uney, Damian Shaw, Sverre Rabbelier Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1556089 CrashCourse
The Economic & Social Goals of the United States of America
 
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This video looks at the different economy and social goals of the United States of America. Is the United States a great country? Is the United States government providing everything it needs too? Find out in this video. In order to make sure you remember all of the important information in the video consider purchasing my guided notes that go with the video. The notes help you focus on the important information and support the channel, so I can keep making more free content for you! Click the link below to buy the guided notes! They are only $1.50! Click here to purchase the guided notes: https://goo.gl/Lhzgfo (To buy a classroom set, simply purchase four copies) Link to guided notes: (Current students only) https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yzMCK5ldOFezBYFTANi9VSwox7vjU8QBByhfC6d_aOw/edit?usp=sharing Subscribe and hit the bell to see a new videos. Subscribe here ►https://goo.gl/7sNYbR ***Information on the Guided Notes *** 1. What are guided notes? - Guided notes are worksheets that have been made to follow along with the video. They are to help you remember what you learn and help you review the content in the video. 2. Why do I have to pay for them? - Unfortunately, these videos are not free for me to make and take a considerable amount of time to make. While I understand that it is never fun to spend money, know that by spending just a couple dollars you help support the channel and make it possible for me (Mr. Sinn) to keep producing more content! 3. What happens after I pay on paypal? - Once you purchase the guided notes for a video you will be able to download the guided notes right away! 4. Can I share the guided notes with others? - If you purchase the guided notes they are only for your use. So please do not share the notes or post them online, this only hurts the channel and will make it so I cannot keep offering free videos or cheap guided notes. 5. What if I want to purchase the notes for my class? - If you are interested in using the notes for your class I ask that you purchase at least four copies of the notes. This again helps support the channel and keeps the price down. If you had questions about how to use the videos for class, or if you needed more resources please feel free to contact me.
Views: 212 Mr. Sinn
Inside Russian Economy
 
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Please order ebook/audiobook of this video to support our channel https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/799374, https://www.amazon.co.uk/Russian-Economy-IntroBooks-ebook/dp/B07B4GY5YV/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541525523&sr=8-1&keywords=Russian+Economy+introbooks or https://www.audible.com/pd/Russian-Economy-Audiobook/B07BHVBN6D?qid=1541525530&sr=sr_1_1&ref=a_search_c3_lProduct_1_1&pf_rd_p=e81b7c27-6880-467a-b5a7-13cef5d729fe&pf_rd_r=QHK5B1W3X2294G6XZRGZ& #History #Russia Russia is the wealthiest country in the world in terms of resources. It has the highest volumes of forests, water lakes, 40% of world palladium and 10% of world oil and gas reserves. It is a mixed economy with state acquiring major sectors of the economy.
Views: 42495 Education Channel
Richest Country Comparison (All 188 Countries Ranking)
 
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An animated comparison of the richest country in the world. All 188 countries ranked according to their National Wealth - how rich are they, and if all their money were to convert to gold, how big will the amount of gold they have relative to the size of a human. Also featuring World's richest person Jeff Bezos who is richer than over 100 countries, and Apple, the richest company, which market capitalization is richer than over 150 countries! Source: Credit Suisse (Global Wealth Data Book 2017) Note: 1) Figures listed refers to National Wealth and NOT GDP!!! National Wealth refers to the cumulative sum of every adult marketable value of financial assets plus non-financial assets (principally housing and land) less debts. 2) All 195 United Nation countries included except for Cape Verde, Nauru, Palestine, St Kitts and Nevis, South Sudan, Tuvalu and Vatican City due to lack of available data. 3) Solid Gold Cube refers to a theoretical 1m by 1m by 1m 100% Gold Cube purchased at the current market price. It does not represent Gold Reserves but rather how much gold can be bought if all national wealth/financial assets were converted into gold. Music Used: Chomatic Fuge - Kevin Macload (incompetech) Featured countries (in order): Sao Tome and Principe, Micronesia, Guinea Bissau, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Tonga, The Gambia, Vanuatu, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Dominica, Grenada, Comoros, Antigua and Barbuda, Maldives, Burundi, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Belize, Swaziland, Samoa, Central African Republic, Djibouti, Guyana, Mauritania, Solomon Islands, Bhutan, Seychelles, Palau, Fiji, Lesotho, Timor-Leste, Rwanda, Madagascar, Barbados, Mozambique, Guinea, Liberia, Somalia, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Republic of Congo, Mali, San Marino, Ethiopia, Tajikistan, Niger, Zambia, Belarus, Eritrea, Montenegro, Togo, Moldova, Syria, Uganda, Bahamas, Ghana, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Nicaragua, Armenia, Brunei, Trinidad and Tobago, Democratic Republic of Congo, Macedonia, Andorra, Gabon, Kyrgyzstan, Benin, Haiti, Jamaica, Senegal, Namibia, Tanzania, Laos, Albania, Mongolia, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Sudan, Turkmenistan, Bahrain, Papua New Guinea, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mauritius, Cambodia, Bolivia, Ivory Coast, Afghanistan, Honduras, Nepal, Yemen, Malta, Paraguay, Kenya, Ukraine, Latvia, North Korea, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Serbia, El Salvador, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Panama, Myanmar, Lithuania, Guatemala, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Venezuela, Cyprus, Lebanon, Uruguay, Bulgaria, Costa Rica, Slovenia, Oman, Slovakia, Dominican Republic, Tunisia, Puerto Rico, Ecuador, Uzbekistan, Luxembourg, Iceland, Nigeria, Angola, Cuba, Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Morocco, Romania, Bangladesh, Kuwait, Hungary, Vietnam, Thailand, Czech Republic, Malaysia, Peru, Pakistan, Argentina, Philippines, United Arab Emirates, Colombia, Finland, Chile, Portugal, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Ireland, Poland, Greece, Israel, Turkey, New Zealand, Singapore, Denmark, Norway, Austria, Mexico, Indonesia, Russia, Sweden, Belgium, Brazil, Netherlands, Switzerland, Spain, India, South Korea, Australia, Canada, Italy, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, China, United States
Views: 9122283 Reigarw Comparisons
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4231911 CrashCourse
South china sea: The Biggest Problem Between China And The United States Isn't The Trade W.ar
 
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The Biggest Problem Between China And The United States Isn't The Trade W.ar SUBSCRIBE my channel here: https://goo.gl/F8gn4Z G+ here: https://goo.gl/UzMJVe ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- There are many problems between China and the United States, including the potential trade wa.r that has unsettled global financial markets. This isn’t the biggest problem between the two countries though. That would be the growing antagonism between the countries and the South China Sea and Africa. This problem could last for years, if not decades, and it could lead to military confrontations between the two countries. The South China Sea is at the forefront of the economic and political agenda in Beijing. It marks the opening of the maritime Silk Road for China, a project that aims to make China the next major economic leader in the world. Roughly $5 trillion of merchandise moves through the sea each year. Then there are the claims Beijing has made that it owns “historical” rights to the South China Sea. Every single inch of it. Beijing defends those rights using intimidation, which bolsters Chinese nationalism, which helps to further propagate the Chinese political status quo. The problem with this is that China is only one player, and they are facing off against everyone else in the game; the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, Vietnam, and Taiwan. China are also playing against the US, UK, France, Japan, and Australia. The navies of those countries aim to allow for free navigation and passage through the vast waterway. Vietnam, Philippines, and China EquitiesKoyfin This is where there is the potential risk of open military confrontation; a situation that would lead to a devastating effect on the financial markets and economic integration of the area. Africa is also at the head of the Beijing economic agenda. Africa provides China with important economic resources at a cheap rate. It creates plenty of profit opportunities for Chinese construction companies too. It establishes a market frontier for the cheap products China makes and establishes a bridge to Latin Americ... ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 175 Hot News
Enhancing Economic Growth Through Immigration
 
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Immigration has always been a vital component of economic growth in the United States, and certain types of immigrants are more likely to start businesses than others. Younger, more educated immigrants are more likely to be entrepreneurial, as are immigrants who come from countries that haven’t traditionally sent many people to America. The United States could boost its economy if it rebalanced its immigration system to give them a preferred path for green cards. For more information, visit the PolicyEd page here: https://www.policyed.org/intellections/enhancing-economic-growth-through-immigration/video Additional resources: Read “Send Us Your Young, Your Educated” by Edward Lazear in the Wall Street Journal, available here: https://on.wsj.com/2D0nfES In “Examining America’s Exceptional Economy,” Edward Lazear explores what has made America's economy successful, what sets it apart from other nations, and what needs to be done to sustain its prominence in the global economy. Available here: https://bit.ly/2H6ltGm Hoover Institution senior fellow Ed Lazear discusses immigration and the economy on the Larry Kudlow Show. Listen here: https://bit.ly/2FkEx1K Hoover Institution senior fellow Ed Lazear says that the United States will face increasing economic competition from fast-growing countries like China and India while technological advances change the makeup of the job market. To minimize disruption, innovation in our education system and fair immigration policy are necessary. To read more, click here: https://bit.ly/2FmUy6x Read “How should we value immigrants, and how should that affect immigration reform?” by Edward Paul Lazear, available here: https://hvr.co/2FmFMgk Read John Cochrane’s chapter “Trade and Immigration” in Blueprint for America here: http://hvr.co/2tugsgd For more on immigration from John Cochrane, click here: http://bit.ly/2sKnvEt Read “America’s Exceptional Economy” by Edward Lazear here: https://hvr.co/2KuxRgC - Subscribe to PolicyEd's YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdSub - Follow PolicyEd on Twitter: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdTwit - Follow PolicyEd on Instagram: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdInsta
Views: 54327 PolicyEd
Geography and Economic Growth
 
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If you look at the African continent, perhaps the first word to come to mind is "enormous." And that's true. You could fit most of the United States, China, India, and a lot of Europe, into Africa. But if you compare Africa to Europe, Europe has two to three times the length of coastline that Africa has. But what does coastline length have to do with anything? Well, coasts mean access to water. As benign as water might seem, it’s a major driver of economic growth. Adam Smith, the father of modern economics, argued that access to water reduced the cost of trade, and gave merchants access to larger markets. These larger markets incentivized specialization and innovation. These twin processes ultimately spurred trade activity, and consequently, economic growth. As an end result, civilization tended to grow wherever trade was easiest. If you want proof of this, think of a few major cities. Look at Istanbul, New York, Venice, Hong Kong, London, and similar areas. What do they all have in common? They all sit near a major coast or a major river. In contrast, look at some of the poorest areas in the world—places like Kampala, or Pointe-Noire. These places are all landlocked. Since goods are easier to transport over water than over land, trade in landlocked areas is more expensive. And what happens when trade is more expensive? It becomes harder to spark economic growth. What this all means is economic growth is not only affected by a country’s rules and institutions, but by a country’s natural blessings, or natural hindrances, too. The effects of geography on growth cannot be discounted. Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1QEP6wS Next video: http://bit.ly/1Q0UHtM Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HpAt/
Economic Growth in the Gilded Age — US Economic History 5
 
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In the Gilded Age (the 1870s and 1880s), the US economy grew faster than ever. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the fifth video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Regulating Monopolies: A History of Electricity Regulation - Learn Liberty (video): Professor Lynne Kiesling explains the motivations behind regulating Gilded Age monopolies and the results of those regulations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=430OAJuh0nk The robber barons weren’t robbers. Here’s why. (blog post): Lawrence Reed argues that Standard Oil shouldn’t be seen as an argument against free markets, but an argument for them. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/the-robber-barons-werent-robbers-heres-why/ How Capitalism Freed Victorian Women - Learn Liberty (video): Dr. Thaddeus Russell explains how the booming economy of the Gilded Age allowed women to find their own jobs, money, and freedom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5n2IzVL_ac TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/us-economic-history-5-economic-growth-in-the-gilded-age LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 12863 Learn Liberty
Income and Wealth Inequality: Crash Course Economics #17
 
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Inequality is a big, big subject. There's racial inequality, gender inequality, and lots and lots of other kinds of inequality. This is Econ, so we're going to talk about wealth inequality and income inequality. There's no question that economic inequality is real. But there is disagreement as to whether income inequality is a problem, and what can or should be done about it. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 856134 CrashCourse
United States of America vs Russia Military Power Comparison 2016
 
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Comparing military power of two countries including manpower, land systems, air power, naval power, resources, logistics, economy, geography and overall global rank. You can help building better videos by following link below to enter new correct data for any country you wish. https://goo.gl/forms/P0he9xRE3BC33hfr1 All music is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0. Music by Scott Buckley – www.scottbuckley.com.au If you like this video, please consider donating for music author on link above.
Views: 341322 FirePower
US Economic History 4 — Economic Causes of the Civil War
 
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Federal tariffs and slavery caused tensions that led to the Civil War. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the fourth video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: The Economic Costs of the Civil War (article): You’ve learned about the economic causes of the Civil War, but what were the economic consequences? Burton Fulsom explains the impact of the war on the economy. https://fee.org/articles/the-economic-costs-of-the-civil-war/ The bell curve of anti-slavery (blog post): Professor Michael Douma explains that there was a lot of diversity of ideas in the abolitionist movement. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/the-bell-curve-of-anti-slavery/ What should libertarians think about the Civil War? (blog post): There is a lot of debate over whether libertarians should see themselves as pro-Union or pro-Confederacy in discussions about the Civil War. Dr. Phil Magness explains why both positions are flawed and advocates for a middle ground. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/what-should-libertarians-think-about-the-civil-war/ TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/us-economic-history-4-economic-causes-of-the-civil-war LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 18086 Learn Liberty
US Economic History 1 — How Mercantilism Started the American Revolution
 
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The British Empire’s mercantilist plan backfired — and led to the American Revolution. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the first video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams, and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Why the American Revolution Was Really an Economic Revolution (blog article): Dr. Robert Wright argues that the American Revolution was just as much caused by economic concerns as it was by political concerns. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/why-the-american-revolution-was-really-an-economic-revolution/ What Motivated Adam Smith? (video): Why did Adam Smith attack mercantilism? Professor Jim Otteson explains what motivated Smith to write The Wealth of Nations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqMK3LmHPZs America’s Founding (video series): Looking to learn more about Colonial America? In this series, Professor Sarah Burns explains the philosophical ideas behind the American Revolution. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wphUAtDGko&list=PL-erRSWG3IoBoVW9dHNg_rcZn-Dj_CQ7o TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/how-mercantilism…rican-revolution/ ‎ LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 35540 Learn Liberty
Caucasus's strategic importance
 
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The US interests in the Caucasus are related to the Azerbaijani and Georgian geographical positions, natural resources, economic influence, energy routes and the Afghanistan Plan. The indispensable strategic position of Azerbaijan makes the country unique. As the country is located between Russia and Iran it serves as a transit state but also a buffer zone for the two. No other country can offer the United States a stronghold that can play a double role. Now consider the economic influence and natural resources of the country and the importance of Azerbaijan increases. Add to this the alternative energy route for Europe that passes through Azerbaijan and Georgia. Then think of the crucial role Azerbaijan plays in the Northern Distribution Network, and the immense value of Azerbaijan and Georgia for the United States is revealed.
Views: 106736 CaspianReport
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
Views: 2056178 CrashCourse
HRM VIDEO - INFO - New Economic Free Zone - Human Resources Mexico S de RL
 
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2019 New Economic Free Zone in Mexico. Franklin provides a summary with important details relating to the new zone. What is it? The Economic Free Zone for the Northern border was implemented January 1, 2019 in 43 municipalities bordering the United States. It offers benefits such as reducing the IVA tax (VAT) from 16% to 8%; and decrease the corporate income tax (ISR) from 30% to 20%, and doubling the daily minimum wage rate. How is this new Economic Free Zone implemented? This zone was created by Presidential Decree and is only valid for a 2 year period unless ratified by the Mexican Congress. (A decree is similar to an executive order in the USA, in other words it bypasses congress, congress then approves or disapproves later) Most international companies base their decisions on a 5 year period. A 2 year trade zone period may not be sufficient to entice foreign company investment. How does it work and who does the Economic Free Zone apply to? IVA (Vat) tax from 16% to 8%: The Decree DOES NOT lower the IVA (Value added tax) to 8%. The Decree offers a “fiscal incentive” to provide a “fiscal credit” for companies that sell tangible products. Those persons or companies can apply during January 2019 for this program with SAT and they can then charge 8% IVA and apply a fiscal credit for the remaining 8% The program only applies to persons or companies selling “tangible products” only. It does not apply importations, real estate, intangible products, digital content, professional services and internet sales. Persons and companies must have at least 18 months in the region with 90% of their income in the border region.   ISR Corporate Income tax from 30% to 20%: To whom does it apply? Individuals or companies with business activity the Northern border region. The requirements are at least 18 months in the border region before the Decree was published. It applies to companies with income of 90% in the border zone. Applicants must apply for the program by the end of March 2019 – SAT will respond within 30 days. Excluded from this program are: Maquiladoras, Financial institutions, production cooperatives, intangible products, internet commerce, outsourcing companies, those with problems with SAT, and companies in bankruptcy. DOUBLING THE MINIMUM WAGE in the border region From 88.36 MXN per day to 176.72 MXN The minimum wage increase basically has no real effect in the border region in as much as the average wage before the increase is $1400 MXN to $1500 MXN per week. In other words, people have already been earning the amount equivalent to or more than the new minimum wage for the border region. If you want an English version of the decree regarding the New Economic Free Zone in the border region of Mexico…I recommend that you visit www.mexicanlaws.com a great web site for people who want to see the Mexican laws in English. Presented by Franklin D. Frith II - General Manager / Principal for Human Resources Mexico S de RL. The Most Trusted PEO in Mexico. The PEO used by the global PEO and International PEO.
Wealth Inequality in America
 
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Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actual numbers. The reality is often not what we think it is. References: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/02/income-inequality-in-america-chart-graph http://danariely.com/2010/09/30/wealth-inequality/ http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2011/10/03/334156/top-five-wealthiest-one-percent/ http://money.cnn.com/2012/04/19/news/economy/ceo-pay/index.htm
Views: 21767983 politizane
United States Economic Assistance To Africa, 1984
 
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SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: DEALS WITH THE VARIOUS WAYS THE U.S. IS TRYING TO HELP AFRICA DEVELOP ITS ECONOMIC RESOURCES AND FOCUSING ON PROJECTS IN FOUR REPRESENTATIVE COUNTRIES - BOTSWANA, KENYA, SENEGAL, AND ZAMBIA. CREATED BY U.S. Information Agency. DATES: (1982 - 10/01/1999 ) CREATOR TYPE: Most Recent USE RESTRICTIONS STATUS: Restricted - Possibly USE RESTRICTIONS SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS: Public Law 101-246 USE RESTRICTIONS NOTE: Issued February 6, 1990, this law provides for the domestic release and distribution of USIA motion pictures, films, videotapes, and other materials 12 years after initial dissemination overseas, or, if not disseminated, 12 years from the preparation of the material. URL: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000UWVH0K NOTE: A DVD of this film can be ordered from our partner, Amazon.com/NATIONALARCHIVES. A DVD of this film is ALSO available for viewing and copying free of charge in the NARA Research Room in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Records Section, National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD. SPECIFIC REC. TYPE: video recordings SUBJECTS Economic assistance FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalDOSearch?searchExpression=54939
Are We Running Out of Resources?
 
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Prof. Steve Horwitz addresses the common belief that the world is running out of natural resources. Instead, there are economic reasons why we will never run out of many resources. In a free market system, prices signal scarcity. So as a resource becomes more scarce, it becomes more expensive, which incentivizes people to use less of it and develop new alternatives, or to find new reserves of that resource that were previously unknown or unprofitable. We have seen throughout history that the human mind's ability to innovate, coupled with a free market economic system, is an unlimited resource that can overcome the limitations we perceive with natural resources. Watch more videos: http://lrnlbty.co/y5tTcY
Views: 194128 Learn Liberty
America's Economic Doom : Documentary on the National Debt and Crumbing Economic System
 
01:50:49
America's Economic Doom : Documentary on the National Debt and Crumbing Economic System . This is a Superb documentary that's very interesting and fun to watch and part of a series of exciting and informative documentaries. This Youtube channel is for learning and educational purposes. Learning and Education are fundamental and important in today's society and becoming increasingly more accessible and convenient online. The availability of important information which is also entertaining helps everyone grow mentally and emotionally as people both individually and as a whole. Documentaries are the resource of choice of the information and internet generations of students around the world. The documentary here along with the other documentaries on this channel relate to important times and people in history, historic places, archaeology, society, world culture, science, conspiracy theories, and education. The topics covered in these video documentaries vary and cover about everything you could possibly want to know including ancient history, Maya, Rome, Greece, The New World, Egypt, World wars, combat, battles, military and combat technology, current affairs and events, important news, Social Studies, education, biographies, famous people and celerities, politicians, news and current events, Illuminati, Area 51, crime, mafia, serial killers, paranormal, supernatural, cults, government cover-ups, the law and legal matters, corruption, martial arts, sports figures, space, aliens, ufos, conspiracy theories, Annunaki, Nibiru, Nephilim, satanic rituals, religion, christianty, judaism, islam, strange phenomenon, origins of Mankind, Neanderthal, Cro Magnon, Inca, Aztec, Persia, Maya, Indus, Mesopotamia, monsters, mobsters, time travel, Third World Issues, planet earth, the Sun, Missions to Mars, The planets, the solar system, the universe, modern physics, String Theory, the Big Bang Theory, Quantum Mechanics, Radio, television, archaeology, science, technology, nature, plants, animals, endangered species, wildlife, animal abuse, environmental concerns and issues, global warming, natural disasters, racism, sexism, LGBT, gay and lesbian issues, and many other educational and controversial topics. Please enjoy and Learn Responsibly!
Views: 113164 VidShowcase
Impact of Illegal Immigration on the U.S. Economy
 
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Illegal immigration increases the unemployment rate and is a drain on the economy, schools, and healthcare resources.
The Economics of Immigration: Crash Course Econ #33
 
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Is Immigration good or bad? Immigration is a touchy subject in the United States. The 2016 election has been filled with debate about the subject, and both proponents and opponents have lots of reasons for their stance. But, this is a show about economics, and when it comes to the effects of immigration on economies, there is actually a lot of consensus. It turns out, immigration is economically beneficial. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 347259 CrashCourse
United States (USA) vs Canada - Who Would Win - Army / Military Comparison
 
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Who has a stronger and more powerful Military? The United States or Canada? Could Canada stand its ground if needed? Today we will compare the navies, ground forces, tanks, air force, etc of the two neighbors: The United States (USA) vs Canada: ⭐SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2glTFyc ⭐ SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL —► http://bit.ly/TheInfographicsShow MILITARY PLAYLIST —► http://bit.ly/MilitaryComparisons WEBSITE (You can suggest a topic): http://theinfographicsshow.com SUPPORT US: Patreon.......► https://www.patreon.com/theinfographicsshow CHAT: DISCORD.....►https://discord.gg/sh5JwUw SOCIAL: Facebook...► https://facebook.com/TheInfographicsShow Instagram..►https://www.instagram.com/theinfographicsshow Twitter........► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit...► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this episode: https://pastebin.com/HG1pQEUN
Views: 2216595 The Infographics Show
Experts warn government shutdown could plunge economy into recession
 
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Some experts say the partial government shutdown could send the economy into a recession if it continues. Tax refunds might be delayed and vital benefits like food stamps may not arrive, taking billions of dollars out of circulation. Washington Post economic policy reporter Damian Paletta joins CBSN with more. Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: http://youtube.com/cbsnews Watch CBSN live HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7 Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/ Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: http://facebook.com/cbsnews Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: http://twitter.com/cbsnews Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.
Views: 187211 CBS News
WW2: The Resource War - Lend-Lease - Extra History - #2
 
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*Sponsored* Hearts of Iron IV comes out on June 6! Check out the game: http://pdxint.at/hoi4_coming_soon After Germany's early push, the situation looked dire in Europe. The United States had resources to help out, but initially clung to an isolationist policy. Gradually, measures like Cash and Carry and the Lend-Lease Act expanded their involvement. --- (Episode details below) Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Watch the WW2: Resource War series! http://bit.ly/1PRaI22 Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ Why doesn't this series use the Nazi swastika symbol? James explains: http://bit.ly/1Pzy1k5 ____________ Germany's blitzkrieg had been largely successful. France fell early, and Great Britain appeared on the verge of collapse. Europe needed more resources to sustain their resistance, but the United States was bound by the Neutrality Act which established a policy of isolationism and forbade the US from supporting foreign wars in any way. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt skirted those restrictions. He lobbied Congress to reinstate a provision in the law called Cash and Carry, which would allow other nations to buy US war materiel with cash and transport it themselves into the warzone. He also established an agreement which allowed him to place American military bases on British colonies in exchange for destroyer ships, thus safeguarding the far reaches of the United Kingdom from possible Axis invasions. When it turned out that the English won the Battle of Britain and successfully staved off the attempted Nazi conquest, America decided to support them in a more substantial, long term way. Thus the Lend-Lease Act was signed: the US would loan equipment to their strategic partners (who were not the Allies yet). Though supposedly the equipment had to be returned, it was pretty obvious that war materiel would not come back in the same shape if at all, so this was really the largest donation of war supplies ever. But it wound up benefiting the US in turn, since the increased production galvanized an economy that had been stagnant since the Great Depression. It also kickstarted the involvement of the US Merchant Marine, who were among the earliest US citizens to give their lives in World War II and suffered the highest casualty percentage of any branch of the service. These unarmed ships navigated U-boat infested waters to bring much needed supplies to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. Despite this, their service has gone largely unrecognized and unrewarded as they are still denied many veterans' benefits and were not even formally thanked by Congress until 2012. ____________ ♫ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♫ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1173247 Extra Credits
Economic Mobility in the United States (EiP, full video)
 
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FRBSF economist Mary C. Daly discusses the extent to which individuals and families in the U.S. achieve upward economic and social mobility, focusing on comparisons over time and to other countries. Mary also discusses the implications of mobility for overall inequality. Transcripts, teaching guides, and additional suggested reading available here: http://www.frbsf.org/education/teachers/economics-in-person/economic-mobility-in-the-united-states.html This video is part of Economics in Person (EiP), which is a video series that brings the expertise of Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (FRBSF) economists directly to you. Access the full EiP series here: http://www.frbsf.org/education/teachers/economics-in-person/index.html
Views: 2594 SF Fed EconEd
The oil wars: How America's energy obsession wrecked the Middle East | Eugene Gholz
 
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Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink --- So for a long time oil has played a special role in American foreign policy and military strategy. Oil is a uniquely important commodity in global affairs. It’s an input to everything in our modern way of life; it’s very important for protecting our prosperity; and at a certain level oil is essential for high-quality military power: to fight you need access to oil. And in the Cold War the United States was concerned that the Soviet Union could interrupt American access to Persian Gulf oil, which we needed in order to defend Europe, defend our own interests against the Soviet Union. And so we took it on as a military mission to protect key sources of oil supplies around the world, especially in the Persian Gulf, from outside interference (so from the Soviet Union being able to threaten them). Now, of course, for a long time the Soviet Union hasn’t existed. That particular scenario hasn’t posed a challenge for the United States, but the United States has feared oil has continued to play a role in American foreign and military policy because the United States has feared that political disruptions in Middle East—internal instability, the threat of extremist fundamentalist Muslim control in the Middle East, if that came about—could pose a threat to American oil supplies that especially would hurt our prosperity, that they could make us poor. And so we’ve used military force to try to reduce instability in parts of the world, especially the Persian Gulf, where we’re afraid that instability would threaten global oil markets. That policy has both been largely unnecessary and largely ineffective. So it has happened that there was a moment where it seemed to work very well when we sent troops in 1990 to defend Saudi Arabia from Saddam Hussein who had just concord Kuwait, and then we liberated Kuwait in the Gulf War but did not continue to attack Iraq. And the result of this was to maintain access to Persian Gulf oil, to maintain the independence of a number of Persian Gulf oil producers. And that made sense in a bunch of ways. But then since that time we’ve actually become a primary threat to stability in the Middle East rather than a primary guarantor of stability in the Middle East, in that when we invaded Iraq we set in motion a lot of events, created a much more salient internal stability challenge for many countries in the Persian Gulf by hardening and militarizing domestic conflicts in a lot of these countries—between Sunnis and Shiites, between different brands within Sunni Islam—we’ve created internal instability that we can’t address very well from outside. The United States lacks the detailed information to understand and manipulate the politics of these countries. Instead we get manipulated by local actors that, in a sense, makes the instability worse. So if you think of it this way, in the United States we spend a lot of time thinking about and studying American politics and elections, but we don’t understand American politics very well. Even with all of the background cultural knowledge we have an understanding of our own politics—nobody expected President Trump to rise as a phenomenon and become president—We don’t understand our own politics! How can we expect to understand and manipulate the politics of far away countries in the Persian Gulf where we don’t know the local percentages as well, we don’t know the situation on the ground, we don’t know what contributes to people’s political activism? Although we can actually be fairly sure of one thing that contributes, which is, they don’t like the feeling that they’re being pushed around by outside influences like the United States showing up and telling them what to do. And so we can create hostility to the United States by saying, “Oh we’re showing up to defend the stability of Middle East oil supplies,” but we can’t actually defend Middle East oil supplies from local instability in the Middle East very well, and so we’ve actually created a lot of the problems in the oil market. However, all of that said, the global oil market protects us so we don’t actually have to worry as much about that kind of instability in any particular oil supplier. So what happens in the oil market is when there’s a disruption in one country of the world that reduces their oil supplies, their ability to supply the global market, to supply consumers like us in the United States, when there’s that kind of a disruption other suppliers compensate. So suppliers that aren’t disrupted see an opportunity to make more money for themselves by increasing their oil output to compensate for the fact that one of their competitors has reduced their oil output.
Views: 29878 Big Think
Is China the next superpower?
 
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Support CaspianReport through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/CaspianReport Many people see China's strength mainly in its economy and although China's economy now ranks as the second largest in the world, its per capita income is still roughly 10 times lower than that of Japan and the United States. Due to The low standard of living China is forced to export. And that's what the Chinese economy is, an export- oriented economic system. This has made China overwhelmingly dependent on consumers in the West. Chinese exports, which go through the global sea trade routes, are dominated by the U.S. Navy. This forces Beijing to invest its resources to build a modern navy to protect its interests. Aside from the economics and naval buildup, China faces enormous domestic issues. The east side of its territory is inhabited by secessionist-minded minority groups. The control of the Eastside takes an enormous toll on the Chinese economy as Beijing has to balance the prosperity in the East with the disparity in the West. Aside from internal fragmentation China faces a lot of external pressure from its neighbors. Unlike the United States, China has to contend with strong regional rivals. Just think of Japan, Russia, and India. Even the smaller neighbors are no pushovers: Taiwan, South Korea, Indonesia, Pakistan and Vietnam; they will put a lot of weight on the Chinese military and economic resources just to defend the Chinese territorial integrity. At best China will be an economic superpower and it will take place as one of the world's leading trading powers. But the economic and military resources of Beijing will always be stretched thin. It has to devote enormous amount of military resources just to defend its territorial integrity from its internal fragilities and external rivals. Sountrack: Decisions Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Be sure to follow CaspianReport on the social media. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/caspianreport Twitter: https://twitter.com/caspianreport LiveLeak: http://www.liveleak.com/c/caspianreport
Views: 702617 CaspianReport
The 2008 Financial Crisis: Crash Course Economics #12
 
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Today on Crash Course Economics, Adriene and Jacob talk about the 2008 financial crisis and the US Goverment's response to the troubles. So, all this starts with home mortgages, and the use of mortgages as an investment instrument. For years, it seemed like the US housing market would go up and up. Like a bubble or something. It turns out it was a bubble. But not the good kind. And the government response was...interesting. Anyway, why are you reading this? Watch the video! More Financial Crisis Resources: Financial Crisis Inquiry Report: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-FCIC/pdf/GPO-FCIC.pdf TAL: Giant Pool of Money: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/355/the-giant-pool-of-money Timeline of the crisis: https://www.stlouisfed.org/financial-crisis/full-timeline http://www.economist.com/news/schoolsbrief/21584534-effects-financial-crisis-are-still-being-felt-five-years-article Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1508037 CrashCourse
Federal Reserve Education
 
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The Federal Reserve System works every day to support a growing and stable U.S. economy. Across the United States, the Federal Reserve, through its Federal Reserve Education program, also helps people understand how the economy works. So consumers have the tools to make sound financial decisions. Through this education program, teachers have access to classroom ready online resources for students from kindergarten to college. Videos, classroom lessons, online education, publications, and more. These resources are all free for educators to use in their lesson plans or as they see fit. Many of the Federal Reserve System's regional Reserve Banks, located in 12 districts across the nation, also offer in person and online professional development that allows educators to deepen their knowledge and hone their craft when it comes to economics, personal finance, and more. Students too can take advantage of in person opportunities by taking tours of exhibits in many of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks around the country. Whether a student visits with their family or a school group, they get an in-depth look at how the Federal Reserve works to promote a healthy, sustainable U.S. economy. At the Board and Reserve Banks, students also get hands on opportunities like internships and participation on student boards, which introduce them to key economics concepts and potential careers in economics and finance. Consumers are empowered to make sound financial decisions through the availability of easy to understand resources that explain personal finance concepts, the broader economy, and the Federal Reserve's role in it. Federal Reserve Education is committed to equipping educators, educating students, and empowering consumers when it comes to understanding and participating in our evolving economy. For more information, visit federalreserveeducation.org to find links to resources and Reserve Bank programs offered near you and follow Federal Reserve Education on Twitter at @FedEconEd.
Views: 1394 Federal Reserve
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 936342 CrashCourse
20. Managing Coastal Resources in an Era of Climate Change
 
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Environmental Politics and Law (EVST 255) The lecture reviews the legal and economic strategies that can be used to manage coastal development. Over half of the United States population lives in coastal areas and will be affected by sea level rise and more intense storms. The lecture looks at the conflict between property rights and efforts to protect coastal ecosystems through the use of eminent domain to create national seashores. Barrier islands such as Fire Island National Seashore and Cape Cod National Seashore are used as case studies; a variety of strategies have been employed to manage these constantly moving islands. The lecture also discusses the role insurance plays in coastal settlement patterns; changes in insurers' policies in high-risk coastal areas could change the way people settle in coastal regions. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Growth of Coastal Zone Population; Management Strategies 13:26 - Chapter 2. Thinking About Vulnerabilities with Principles of Ecology 19:53 - Chapter 3. The Cape Cod Case: Private Property and Eminent Domain 32:47 - Chapter 4. The Fire Island Case: Carrot and Stick Approach 38:47 - Chapter 5. Additional Pre- and Post-storm Examples; Best Practices Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
Views: 7345 YaleCourses
The Civil War, Part I: Crash Course US History #20
 
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In which John Green ACTUALLY teaches about the Civil War. In part one of our two part look at the US Civil War, John looks into the causes of the war, and the motivations of the individuals who went to war. The overarching causes and the individual motivations were not always the same, you see. John also looks into why the North won, and whether that outcome was inevitable. The North's industrial and population advantages are examined, as are the problems of the Confederacy, including its need to build a nation at the same time it was fighting a war. As usual, John doesn't get much into the actual battle by battle breakdown. He does talk a little about the overarching strategy that won the war, and Grant's plan to just overwhelm the South with numbers. Grant took a lot of losses in the latter days of the war, but in the end, it did lead to the surrender of the South. If you want to learn more about the Civil War, we recommend these books: Battle Cry of Freedom by James McPherson The Civil War by Shelby Foote Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. There were many causes of the American Civil War and events that led to disunion: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/causes-of-the-american-civil-war Once the war started, its outcome was determined by the different abilities and resources of the divided North and South: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/a-nation-divided-north-vs-south follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @br8ybrunch Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 3018852 CrashCourse
Uneven Signs of Growth in the Transport Industry
 
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This is the VOA Special English Economics Report , from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish A look at some industries in the United States shows that the economic recovery is uneven. And growth seems to be slowing down. We spoke with experts in the transportation industry, which is easily affected by economic changes. Economists say trucks carry nearly 70 percent of the freight, or goods, transported in the United States. The American Trucking Association represents the interests of the trucking industry. It says freight is a good measure of the economy. This is because businesses have to move unprocessed materials, carry parts to factories, and transport imports and exports. Bob Costello is the chief economist for the group. He says the trucking industry is a leading economic indicator. That means that it helps signal what will happen in the economy. He says it is a good sign if the amount of goods carried by trucks increases.And the amount of freight carried by trucks is going up slowly. The American Trucking Association says total freight tonnage increased in June, but remained unchanged in July. That is good news to Bob Costello. He says it tells him that the economy is not falling into another recession. Other information about economic growth comes from air freight, or goods transported by air. Recent reports show demand for air freight fell more than three percent around the world during July. Perry Flint is with the International Air Transport Association. That group represents about two hundred forty airline companies worldwide. It gathers information about air passenger travel and air freight. It says international air freight decreased in July from the same period the year before. But other signs show increases. The same report shows that passenger traffic increased over three percent from last year. That may be why a top official of Cambria Suites Hotels says all travel, not just business travel, is strong. Michael Murphy says, "We are seeing the highest demand in the history of the hotel industry right now." Conflicting economic signs have made it difficult for economists to predict future growth. For example, government experts first said the American economy expanded at a yearly rate of 1.5 percent from April to June.But they amended that value as new information became available and showed growth was higher -- more likely a rate of 1.7 percent. Changes like that have made it harder for many people to see the road ahead.For VOA Learning English, I'm Laurel Bowman. (Adapted from a radio program broadcast 07Sep2012)
Views: 54290 VOA Learning English
The Great Depression: Crash Course US History #33
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the Great Depression. So, everybody knows that the Great Depression started with the stock market crash in 1929, right? Not exactly. The Depression happened after the stock market crash, but wasn't caused by the crash. John will teach you about how the depression started, what Herbert Hoover tried to do to fix it, and why those efforts failed. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The Roaring Twenties ended with The Great Depression, a period of soul-searching for the United States dealing with a failing middle class: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-great-depression The issues of the Great Depression were made more difficult by the agricultural crisis known as the Dust Bowl: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/excerpt-from-on-drought-conditions
Views: 3230419 CrashCourse
Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country
 
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Though the United States and Canada are the world's largest trading partners, internal politics and long wait times at the shared border have hurt both trade and tourism. With Asian economies on the rise, noted Canadian journalist Diane Francis argues that the United States and Canada should merge to become an economic superpower-- one with unparalleled access to natural resources. In her book, Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country, Francis lays out her plan for a future union, providing strong arguments and citing impending social, political, and natural crises as reasons to do so.
Views: 20172 WoodrowWilsonCenter
APUSH Review: Alexander Hamilton's Financial Plan
 
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A brief review of everything important about the Constitution that you need to know to succeed in APUSH. Please visit www.apushreview.com for more videos and resources. Thanks for watching!
Views: 51028 Adam Norris
American Imperialism: Crash Course US History #28
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Imperialism. In the late 19th century, the great powers of Europe were running around the world obtaining colonial possessions, especially in Africa and Asia. The United States, which as a young country was especially suceptible to peer pressure, followed along and snapped up some colonies of its own. The US saw that Spain's hold on its empire was weak, and like some kind of expansionist predator, it jumped into the Cuban War for Independence and turned it into the Spanish-Cuban-Phillipino-American War, which usually just gets called the Spanish-American War. John will tell you how America turned this war into colonial possessions like Puerto Rico, The Philippines, and almost even got to keep Cuba. The US was busy in the Pacific as well, wresting control of Hawaii from the Hawaiians. All this and more in a globe-trotting, oppressing episode of Crash Course US History. Our Subbable Dooblydoo message today is from James Williams. He writes, "Gracie Mckenna, luck is, indeed, for suckers." You can support Crash Course directly by subscribing and pledging a monthly gift at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse. You could even have your own message in the Dooblydoo. If you subscribed via Subbable when the service first launched, you may need to go back and resubscribe. Thanks for your support. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. As America transitioned from the 19th to the 20th century, she experimented with imperialism through war and annexation; one of the most lasting effects of this time was the annexation of Hawaii, America's 50th state: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-1897-petition-against-the-annexation-of-hawaii America’s imperial aims continued for decades, particularly with the Monroe Doctrine: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-monroe-doctrine-and-american-imperialism Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler
Views: 2271743 CrashCourse
Slavery - Crash Course US History #13
 
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In which John Green teaches you about America's "peculiar institution," slavery. I wouldn't really call it peculiar. I'd lean more toward horrifying and depressing institution, but nobody asked me. John will talk about what life was like for a slave in the 19th century United States, and how slaves resisted oppression, to the degree that was possible. We'll hear about cotton plantations, violent punishment of slaves, day to day slave life, and slave rebellions. Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman, and Whipped Peter all make an appearance. Slavery as an institution is arguably the darkest part of America's history, and we're still dealing with its aftermath 150 years after it ended. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Memoirs from former slaves like abolitionist Frederick Douglass provide insightful context on the harsh realities of slavery: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-narrative-of-the-life-of-frederick-douglass-excerpt-from-chapter-1 Others resisted the violence of slavery through open rebellion, like Nat Turner: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/nat-turner-s-slave-revolt Abolitionists and free slaves alike had to fight against unfair laws such as the Fugitive Slave Act: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/fugitive-slave-act-of-1793
Views: 3001938 CrashCourse
What is the Gold Standard? - Learn Liberty
 
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Before 1974, U.S. dollars were backed by gold. This meant that the federal government could not print more money than it could redeem for gold. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP. While this constrained the federal government, it also provided citizens with a relatively stable purchasing power for goods and services. Today's paper currency has no intrinsic value. It is not based on the value of gold or anything else. Under a gold standard, inflation was really limited. With floating value, or fiat, currency, however, some countries have seen inflation reach extremely high levels—sometimes enough to lead to economic collapse. Gold standards have historically provided more stable currencies with lower inflation than fiat currency. Should the United States return to a gold standard? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 284014 Learn Liberty

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